Popular Friction News and Current Events

Popular Friction News and Current Events, Friction News Articles.
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Tiny soft robot with multilegs paves way for drugs delivery in human body
A novel tiny, soft robot with caterpillar-like legs capable of carrying heavy loads and adaptable to adverse environment was developed from a research led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU). This mini delivery-robot could pave way for medical technology advancement such as drugs delivery in human body. (2018-09-26)

Chameleon-inspired structural color soft robot can interact with environment
A novel structural color soft robot with both color-changing and locomotion capabilities has been developed by a research team led by Dr. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2019-07-31)

Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

Research shows how environment plays key role in changing movement behavior of animals
University of Leicester mathematicians develop theory which helps to unravel long-standing mysteries of animal movement. (2017-10-30)

Solid research leads physicists to propose new state of matter
The term 'superfluid quasicrystal' sounds like something a comic-book villain might use to carry out his dastardly plans. In reality, it's a new form of matter proposed by theoretical physicists at The University of Texas at Dallas in a recent study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. Their study also describes a 'recipe' for making the exotic materials in the lab. (2018-04-09)

MSU-based specialists in mechanics investigated the behavior of vacuum oil in space
A research team from the Research Institute of Mechanics, MSU together with a colleague from the Center of New Space Technologies, MAI described the behavior of a liquid sheet propagating in open space. The results of the study were published in the Physics of Fluids journal. (2018-05-04)

Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
New maps of a mountainous landscape under a key glacier in West Antarctica will be a valuable aid in forecasting sea level changes. (2017-11-20)

Distributed cooperative anti-disturbance control of multi-agent systems: An overview
Recently, a review paper concerned on recent progress in distributed cooperative anti-disturbance control (DCADC) of multi-agent systems is published by journal SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences. Some future research topics regarding DCADC methods are also pointed out. (2017-11-13)

The limits of friction
In collaboration with their Italian colleagues, researchers from the University of Konstanz have demonstrated how to entirely suppress static friction between two surfaces. This means that even a minuscule force suffices to set objects in motion. Especially in micromechanical parts, where only small forces are at play, a vanishing static friction can lead to hugely improved levels of efficiency. (2018-03-29)

Friction found where there should be none: In superfluids near absolute zero
Physicists at Aalto University have discovered unexpected friction while rotating superfluid helium. Understanding the friction's provenance and implications is crucial for designing any devices that rely on superconducting quantum phenomena, such as quantum computers. (2018-02-01)

Your gadget's next power supply? Your body
Searching for a power outlet may soon become a thing of the past. Instead, devices will receive electricity from a small metallic tab that, when attached to the body, is capable of generating electricity from bending a finger and other simple movements. (2018-02-09)

Graphene cracks the glass corrosion problem
Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have demonstrated graphene coating protects glass from corrosion. (2016-10-18)

Researchers run first tests of unique system for welding highly irradiated metal alloys
Scientists of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) and partners from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have conducted the first weld tests to repair highly irradiated materials at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (2018-02-08)

A heavyweight solution for lighter-weight combat vehicles
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed and successfully tested a novel process -- called Friction Stir Dovetailing -- that joins thick plates of aluminum to steel. The new process will be used to make lighter-weight military vehicles that are more agile and fuel efficient. (2018-04-13)

UBC research highlights need to safeguard drones and robotic cars against cyber attacks
UBC researchers executed successful stealth attacks on real and simulated robotic vehicles, revealing vulnerabilities in the attack detection system most commonly used by such vehicles. (2019-11-27)

Static electricity could charge our electronics
Static electricity is one of the most common, yet poorly understand, forms of power generation. A new study suggests the cause of this hair-raising phenomenon is tiny structural changes that occur at the surface of materials when they come into contact with each other. The finding could someday help technology companies create more sustainable and longer-lasting power sources for small electronic devices. (2019-01-25)

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony
Researchers playing with a cloud of ultracold atoms uncovered behavior that bears a striking resemblance to the universe in microcosm. Their work, which forges new connections between atomic physics and the sudden expansion of the early universe, will be published in Physical Review X and highlighted by Physics. (2018-04-19)

The slipperiness of ice explained
Everybody knows that sliding on ice or snow, is much easier than sliding on most other surfaces. But why is the ice surface slippery? Researchers from AMOLF, the University of Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, have now shown that the slipperiness of ice is a consequence of the ease with which the topmost water molecules can roll over the ice surface. (2018-05-09)

What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?
If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake. That's the theory driving the research of Hisham Abdel-Aal, PhD, an associate teaching professor from Drexel University's College of Engineering who is studying snake skin to help engineers improve the design of textured surfaces, such as engine cylinder liners, prosthetic joints - and yes, maybe even footwear. (2018-05-21)

How bees stay cool on hot summer days
Harvard researchers have developed a framework that explains how bees use environmental signals to collectively cluster and continuously ventilate the hive. (2019-02-08)

Gone with the wind: Argonne coating shows surprising potential to improve reliability in wind power
A group of researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Akron discovered that a particular form of carbon coating not necessarily designed for wind turbines may indeed prove a boon to the wind industry -- a serendipitous finding that was recently highlighted in the journal Tribology International. (2016-05-17)

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap
In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study led by CIRES Fellow Mike Willis, an assistant professor of Geology at CU Boulder. That dwarfs the ice's previous average speed of about 2 inches per day and has challenged scientists' assumptions about the stability of the cold ice caps dotting Earth's high latitudes. (2018-09-19)

Collagen in cartilage tissues behaves like liquid crystals in a smart phone screen
Cartilage in our joints contains collagen which behaves a bit like the liquid crystals on a smart phone screen, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). (2017-08-17)

The mystery of touch and how we feel about it
The mechanism of tactile sensation has not yet been solved though it is the basic sense of humans. NITech scientists investigated its mechanism and found the important cues in touch could be different for each person. When humans evaluate the roughness, different individuals weigh skin vibration information, spatial information, and other mechanical properties differently. The goal is to establish an estimation model of perceptual roughness ratings involving individual differences in the cognitive weights. (2019-03-29)

Trust in others predicts mortality in the United States
Do you trust other people? It may prolong your life. According to a study by researchers from Lund University and Stockholm University, people who trust others live longer -- Those who do not increase their risk of a shortened life. The study is published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. (2018-10-25)

Discovery sets new world standard in nano generators
A team of University of Alberta engineers has developed a new way to produce electrical power that can charge handheld devices or sensors that monitor anything from pipelines to medical implants. The discovery sets a new world standard in triboelectric nanogenerators by producing a high-density DC current--a vast improvement over low-quality AC currents produced by other research teams. The devices can transform mechanical energy such as wind or vibrations into electricity. (2017-12-11)

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understanding
Nanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip. (2018-06-27)

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound
Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step. (2018-12-21)

Material for nuclear reactors to become harder
Scientists from NUST MISIS developed a unique composite material that can be used in harsh temperature conditions, such as those in nuclear reactors. The microhardness of the sandwich material is 3 times higher compared to the microhardness of its individual components. These properties withstand temperatures up to 700°?. The results of the research are published in Materials Letters. (2019-09-30)

New hydronium-ion battery presents opportunity for more sustainable energy storage
A new type of battery shows promise for sustainable, high-power energy storage.It's the world's first battery to use only hydronium ions as the charge carrier. (2017-02-20)

Friction loss at first contact: The material does not forgive
Wear has major impacts on economic efficiency or health. All movable parts are affected, examples being the bearing of a wind power plant or an artificial hip joint. However, the exact cause of wear is still unclear. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) recently proved that the effect occurs at the first contact already and always takes place at the same point of the material. Their findings help develop optimized materials and reduce consumption of energy and raw materials. (2018-08-30)

Modified 'white graphene' for eco-friendly energy
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU), together with colleagues from the United States and Germany, have found a way to obtain inexpensive catalysts from hexagonal boron nitride or ''white graphene''. The technology can be used in the production of environmentally friendly hydrogen fuel. (2019-04-22)

Alpine rock axeheads became social and economic exchange fetishes in the Neolithic
The mechanical capacity to resist successive transformation processes gave these rocks an exceptional exchange value that favoured the formation of long-distance exchange networks in Western Europe, according to a study led by the UAB that integrates petrography, materials science and paleoeconomics. (2019-11-14)

Study advocates psychological screening for the carers of child burn victims
A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology highlights the need for psychological screening for families/primary caregivers after a child sustains a burn injury. (2018-11-06)

Engineers tackle sports
Sports engineers from around the world will bring a scientific perspective to some of our favorite pastimes Sept. 13 to 16 at the Fifth International Conference on Engineering of Sport, held at the University of California, Davis. (2004-08-09)

Tides Recorded The Moon's Retreat From Earth, Shorter Earth Days
Layers of sediment deposited by tides show that 900 million years ago, a day on Earth was 18 hours long. The moon has been moving away from Earth at a constant rate, according to the same evidence. University of Arizona planetary scientists and collaborating geologists publish their analysis today (July 5) in Science (1996-07-05)

Smart, self-powered knee implants could reduce number of knee replacement surgeries
Smart knee implants may soon be a reality thanks to research conducted by a team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-01-29)

Why noise can enhance sensitivity to weak signals
A team of Japanese researchers has discovered a new mechanism to explain stochastic resonance, in which sensitivity to weak signals is enhanced by noise. The finding is expected to help electronic devices become smaller and more energy efficient. (2018-04-05)

Safe fog
Safety combined with power and effectiveness is one of the most important targets in the development of pyrotechnic obscurants. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German and Polish scientists introduced phosphorus nitride as a safe but very powerful alternative to the well-known red phosphorus formulations, which have been used in military and civilian applications for decades. (2016-11-10)

It all comes down to roughness
Lucio Isa and his team of researchers have explained how the surface characteristics of microspheres affect rapid increases in the viscosity of suspensions, thus laying the groundwork for applications such as smoothly flowing cement. (2018-05-02)

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