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Popular Frog News and Current Events

Popular Frog News and Current Events, Frog News Articles.
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Optical magnetic field sensor can detect signals from the nervous system
The human body is controlled by electrical impulses in the brain, the heart and nervous system. (2016-07-15)
Wood frogs research clarifies risks posed to animals by warming climate
As conditions warm, fish and wildlife living at the southern edge of their species' ranges are most at risk, according to Penn State researchers who led a major collaborative study of how wood frogs are being affected by climate change. (2017-08-19)
Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)
Doubling down on DNA
The African clawed frog X. laevis genome contains two full sets of chromosomes from two extinct ancestors. (2016-10-19)
Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. (2017-08-18)
Frogs reveal mechanism that determines viability of hybrids
Why are some hybrids viable and others not? It is known that this depends on the father species and the mother species. (2018-01-10)
New, rare and threatened species discovered in Ghana
Scientists exploring one of the largest remaining blocks of tropical forest in Western Africa discovered significant populations of new, rare and threatened species underscoring the area's high biological diversity and value. (2007-12-06)
Scientists found a new genus and species of frogs
A team of scientists from MSU and their foreign colleagues discovered a previously unknown species and genus of batrachians Siamophryne troglodytes. (2018-03-29)
Fat-sensing hormone helps control tadpole metamorphosis
When tadpoles are but tadpoles, they're voracious eaters, chomping down all of the plant matter in their paths. (2018-03-29)
Study finds 'black box' methods used by biologists probably overestimate number of new species
A study published in the journal Molecular Ecology demonstrates the misuse and abuse of methods scientists commonly use to place boundaries between different species. (2017-11-14)
Missing in action
A UCSB ecologist unearths the foothill yellow-legged frog's past in order to inform its future. (2018-01-25)
What stops mass extinctions?
What slows or stops a disease epidemic if the pathogen is still present? (2018-03-29)
Study: Suburban ponds are a septic buffet
A new study shows that human waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds. (2017-12-12)
Extraordinary treefrog discovered in the Andes of Ecuador
A dazzling new species of treefrog was discovered at a remote tabletop mountain in the Ecuadorian Andes. (2019-01-03)
Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)
Common insecticide can decimate tadpole populations
The latest findings of a University of Pittsburgh-based project to determine the environmental impact of routine pesticide use suggests that malathion -- the most popular insecticide in the United States -- can decimate tadpole populations by altering their food chain, according to research published in the Oct. (2008-09-29)
UCF team discovers, names new frog species
An international team of researchers have identified and described two new frog species and have named one of them after a University of Central Florida professor. (2019-07-18)
Frog slime kills flu virus
Frogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. (2017-04-18)
UGA study reveals ecosystem-level consequences of frog extinctions
Streams that once sang with the croaks, chirps and ribbits of dozens of frog species have gone silent. (2008-10-16)
Signalling study sheds light on conditions from alopecia to cancer
Researchers from the University of Dundee and the Francis Crick Institute have made a significant discovery about a cellular pathway associated with developmental defects and a myriad of diseases ranging from alopecia to colorectal cancer. (2018-03-22)
The unique pentraxin-carbonic anhydrase protein regulates the ability of fish to swim
A study carried out at the University of Tampere has shown that carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI) is present in some species as a combination of two proteins. (2017-12-07)
Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin
A far-reaching global study led by University of Colorado Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments. (2019-03-27)
Making waves
New approach enables measurements of changes in thousands of proteins in the minutes after frog eggs are fertilized, revealing previously opaque mechanisms such as how the destruction of a small number of proteins releases the 'brakes' on an egg's cell cycle. (2017-12-21)
Vocal neurons encode evolution of frog calls
A study of two closely related frog species reveals a population of neurons that give rise to the unique mating calls of each species. (2018-05-21)
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers discover new frog species on remote Ethiopian mountain
A new species of puddle frog (order: Anura, family: Phynobatrachidae, genus: Phrynobatrachus), has just been discovered by NYU Abu Dhabi researchers at the unexplored and isolated Bibita Mountain in southwestern Ethiopia. (2019-02-12)
Oldest frog relative found in North America
A team of paleontologists led by Virginia Tech's Michelle Stocker and Sterling Nesbitt of the Department of Geosciences have identified fossil fragments of what are thought to be the oldest known frogs in North America. (2019-02-27)
Science snapshots: A toxin antidote in frogs, atomic motion in 4D, and better biofuels
In new research from Berkeley Lab and our collaborators, scientists discovered how a protein produced by bullfrogs inhibits the deadly neurotoxin involved in red tide events, glimpsed how atoms move in four dimensions, and identified a bacterial gene that could be engineered into biofuel-producing microbes to greatly boost process efficiency. (2019-06-26)
Atrazine alters the sex ration in Blanchard's cricket frogs
A study published recently in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry found that Blanchard's cricket frogs are highly sensitive to atrazine. (2017-10-13)
Study reveals declining central American frog species are bouncing back
For more than 40 years, frog populations around the world have been declining. (2018-04-11)
What doesn't kill you
After suffering mass mortality for years due to infection with the deadly Batrachochytrium dendrobatridis fungus, or chytrid, some frog populations in El Copé, Panama, now seem to be co-existing with the pathogen and stabilizing their populations. (2018-10-03)
Bacteria may help frogs attract mates
The role played by symbiotic microorganisms isolated from the skin of anurans has been discovered by researchers in Brazil. (2019-03-14)
'Old-fashioned fieldwork' puts new frog species on the map
Months of old-fashioned fieldwork helped define the range and unique characteristics of the recently discovered Atlantic Coast leopard frog. (2018-11-26)
Drier mountains pose a double whammy for cold-adapted amphibians, says SFU study
A species of frog endemic to the Pacific Northwest faces a 50 per cent increase in the probability of extinction by the 2080s due to climate change, according to a new study published by SFU researchers in the Ecological Society of America. (2019-01-25)
An evolutionary breakpoint in cell division
Japanese researchers from Osaka University have discovered that the interaction between two proteins, M18BP1/KNL2 and CENP-A, is essential for cell division in various species except for mammals including humans. (2017-07-30)
Deadly fungus threatens African frogs
Misty mountains, glistening forests and blue-green lakes make Cameroon, the wettest part of Africa, a tropical wonderland for amphibians. (2016-05-06)
Invasive water frogs too dominant for native species
In the past two decades, water frogs have spread rapidly in Central Europe. (2016-02-29)
Neurobiology: Fixated on food?
Contrast has an impact on the optokinetic reflex, which enables us to clearly perceive the landscape from a moving train. (2017-11-20)
Killing flu viruses with help from a frog
Frog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. (2017-04-18)
Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a cost
Amphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-07-17)
Global trade spreads deadly frog disease from Asia
New research has revealed a deadly disease that threatens the survival of the world's frogs originated from East Asia, and global trade was almost certainly responsible for the disease's spread. (2018-05-10)
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