Popular Fruit Fly News and Current Events

Popular Fruit Fly News and Current Events, Fruit Fly News Articles.
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Outcompeting cancer
Suppressing the capacity of tumors to destroy the healthy tissue that surrounds them is essential for fighting cancer-induced morbidity and mortality. Now, a new study in human-derived tumors reveals a potential way of doing just that. The study reveals a competition mechanism used by human cancer cells for killing their neighbors and demonstrates that combining substances that block this mechanism with chemotherapy results in more effective tumor elimination. These findings may lead to the development of novel cancer therapies. (2019-07-24)

Unlocking the genome
A team led by Prof. Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) uncovers how access to relevant DNA regions is orchestrated in epithelial cells. These findings shed new light on the biological mechanisms of gene regulation and open up potential new avenues for cellular reprogramming. (2018-06-04)

Diet modifications - including more wine and cheese - may help reduce cognitive decline
The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years, according to new Iowa State University research. The study is the first of its kind to connect specific foods with cognitive decline. The findings show cheese protected against age-related cognitive problems and red wine was related to improvements in cognitive function. (2020-12-10)

Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. (2019-09-10)

WSU researchers discover new clues on how sleep works in the brain
Star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes appear to play an essential role in sleep, a new study by scientists from the Washington State University Sleep and Performance Research Center confirms. Published today in PLOS Genetics, their study shows that astrocytes communicate to neurons to regulate sleep time in fruit flies and suggests it may do the same in mammals, including humans. (2018-10-31)

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)

CNIC scientists develop new methods for analyzing gene function
Scientists at the CNIC have developed new methods to produce and analyze genetic mosaics. In these mosaics, tissues contain various groups of cells with different known genotypes, permitting study of the differences that these genotypes generate in cell behavior. (2017-08-10)

WSU researchers see human immune response in the fruit fly
Washington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines. (2018-06-19)

Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. His discovery gives hope to Parkinson's patients. This research was done in collaboration with colleagues from Northern Illinois University and will be published this evening on the website of the authoritative journal Science. (2012-05-11)

Your stools reveal whether you can lose weight
Something as simple as a feces sample reveals whether you can lose weight by following dietary recommendations characterized by a high content of fruit, vegetables, fibers and whole grains. This is a finding of a new study conducted at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. (2017-09-12)

WSU researchers use coal waste to create sustainable concrete
Washington State University researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation. (2018-07-12)

Even flies like a familiar song
The process that allows sounds experienced during infancy to shape language is poorly understood. Researchers at Nagoya University found that courtship behavior in Drosophila melanogaster can be shaped by earlier auditory experiences. Their findings allowed them to develop a novel and simple neurological model to study how experiences of sound can shape complex modes of communication in animals. (2018-03-20)

Food policies could lower US cardiovascular disease rates
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and partners shows that food policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States. (2017-06-06)

How a protein could become the next big sweetener
High-fructose corn syrup and sugar are on the outs with calorie-wary consumers. As a result, low- and no-calorie alternatives have become popular, and soon, there could be another option that tastes more sugar-like than other substitutes. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry a step toward commercial production of a fruit protein called brazzein that is far sweeter than sugar -- and has fewer calories. (2016-08-17)

Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomes: Otago research
University of Otago researchers have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables. (2018-04-15)

The evolution of Dark-fly
On Nov. 11, 1954, Syuiti Mori turned out the lights on a small group of fruit flies. More than 60 years later, the descendants of those flies have adapted to life without light. These flies -- a variety known as 'Dark-fly' -- outcompete their light-loving cousins when they live together in constant darkness, according to research reported in G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. Re-playing the evolution of Dark-fly identified the genomic regions that contribute to its success in the dark. (2016-02-04)

Throwing new light on printed organic solar cells
Researchers at the University of Surrey have achieved record power conversion efficiencies for large area organic solar cells. In recent years scientists have been attempting to increase the efficiency of these cells to allow commercial applications such as integration into a building's glass fa├žade, generating electricity to power the building. (2016-11-30)

New study changes our view on flying insects
For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. At this speed, they are the most efficient and consume the least amount of energy. Corresponding phenomena have previously been demonstrated in birds, but never among insects. (2017-09-29)

New study demonstrates importance of studying sleep and eating in tandem
A new study offers important insights into possible links between sleep and hunger. (2017-10-13)

Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases
Northwestern University researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons. (2019-04-02)

Mangoes helped improve cardiovascular and gut health in women
A new study conducted at the University of California, Davis found that two cups of mangoes a day had beneficial effects on systolic blood pressure among healthy postmenopausal women. (2018-06-11)

Neurons thrive even when malnourished
When animal, insect or human embryos grow in a malnourished environment, their developing nervous systems get first pick of any available nutrients so that new neurons can be made. (2020-06-24)

Women who eat fast food take longer to become pregnant
Women who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study by researchers at the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute. (2018-05-03)

Slowing metabolic rate can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations
In a new Northwestern University study, researchers slowed mutant fruit flies' metabolic rates by 50%, and the expected detrimental effects of many mutations never manifested. After experimentally testing fruit flies' many different genetic mutations, the researchers found the same result each time. (2019-07-25)

Uncovering a reversible master switch for development
In a paper published in Genes & Development, BWH principal investigator Mitzi Kuroda, PhD, and her team identified a reversible 'master switch' on most developmental genes. The team unearthed this biological insight through studies in the fruit fly -- a powerful model organism for studying how human genes are organized and function. (2017-11-13)

The sixth Ttaste?
UCSB biologists enhance the scientific understanding of calcium taste (2018-01-03)

Study shows effectiveness of the school fruit scheme in North Rhine-Westphalia
How can you convince elementary school students to consume more fruit and vegetables? Scientists from the University of Bonn and the University of Koblenz-Landau have found that school fruit schemes can actually help to achieve this goal. If children receive fruit and vegetables free of charge in their schools several times a week, they consume considerably more of this food group, which is often less popular with children, even on days without school fruit distribution. (2018-01-29)

Closed marriage: An orchid that never blooms
'When plants give up photosynthesis, this changes their relationship with other organisms, such as the insects who may pollinate them', comments Professor Suetsugu. (2018-01-11)

Conserving historic apple trees
Many apple varieties common in the United States a century ago can no longer be found in today's orchards and nurseries. But some historic apple trees still survive in abandoned farmsteads and historic orchards throughout the US. Now, scientists interested in conserving these horticultural treasures have set out to identify and catalogue them, working to discover if the last remnants of historical trees may still be alive in American landscapes. (2009-11-04)

Montana State University researchers publish study
'Fruit and vegetable desirability is lower in more rural built food environments of Montana, USA using the Produce Desirability(ProDes) Tool' was published in the journal Food Security. (2018-03-23)

Fruit and vegetables may be important for mental as well as physical well-being
Researchers at the universities of Leeds and York analysed data from more than 40,000 people in the UK, and found that changes in fruit and vegetable consumption are correlated with changes in mental well-being. (2019-02-05)

Freeloading orchid relies on mushrooms above and below ground
The orchid species Gastrodia pubilabiata mimics rotting mushrooms or fermented fruit, and is pollinated by fruit flies who mistakenly lay their eggs in its flowers. If there are rotting mushrooms near the orchid, its pollination rate increases. As well as using mushrooms to attract insect pollinators, G. pubilabiata survives by absorbing nutrients from the fungal hyphae of mushrooms. This is the first time a plant has been discovered to depend on mushrooms both above and below ground. (2018-03-22)

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species
Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows. (2018-04-12)

CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. (2019-02-26)

Early use of 'hurricane hunter' data improves hurricane intensity predictions
Data collected via airplane when a hurricane is developing can improve hurricane intensity predictions by up to 15 percent, according to Penn State researchers who have been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Hurricane Center to put the new technique into practice. (2016-05-25)

New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
A new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Measuring 0.395 mm in body length, it is also now the smallest known fly. Entomologist Brian Brown explains he named it for Schwarzenegger, apart from its 'bulging legs,' in tribute to the inspirational role the celebrity had in the scientist's teenage years. His research article is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. (2018-01-24)

Some veggies each day keeps the stress blues away
Eating three to four servings of vegetables daily is associated with a lower incidence of psychological stress, new research by University of Sydney scholars reveals. (2017-03-15)

New genes on 'deteriorating' Y chromosome
Decoding Y chromosomes is difficult even with latest sequencing technologies. The question which genes lie on the chromosome and where they came from is hotly debated. Using a new analysis method, scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna made a crucial breakthrough. They showed that genetic material in fruit flies is often transferred to the Y chromosome from other chromosomes. Although largely a result of 'accidents', some of these transfers create functional genes. Published in PNAS. (2017-10-25)

Hundreds of fossilized eggs sheds light on pterosaur development
An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs. (2017-11-30)

UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes
Biologists at UC look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges. (2018-01-11)

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