Popular Gardening News and Current Events

Popular Gardening News and Current Events, Gardening News Articles.
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Any physical activity in elderly better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk
Any physical activity in the elderly is better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk, according to an 18-year study in more than 24,000 adults published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (2017-11-22)

Dementia education
School-based dementia education could deliver much needed empathy and understanding for older generations as new research from the University of South Australia shows it can significantly improve dementia knowledge and awareness among younger generations. (2020-08-20)

Stem cells treat macular degeneration
UCSB researchers helped develop a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss. (2018-03-19)

Is physical activity always good for the heart?
Physical activity is thought to be our greatest ally in the fight against cardiovascular disease. But there may be significant variations in its protective effects across a range of different situations. (2019-11-04)

New research reveals how gardeners can dig for health, not injury
New research from Coventry University and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) reveals that a bad digging technique can as much as double the load on the joints in the body, leaving people susceptible to chronic injuries. (2018-01-08)

Cutting edge technology reveals how to dig
Musculoskeletal modeling applied to horticultural workers engaged in digging to predict risk of injury. (2018-01-22)

How consumers responded to COVID-19
The coronavirus pandemic has been a catalyst for laying out the different threats that consumers face, and that consumers must prepare themselves for a constantly shifting landscape moving forward. A new study sets a framework for researchers to explore these topics and identify the needs of consumers during disruptive times. (2020-10-12)

Just a few minutes of light intensity exercise linked to lower death risk in older men
Clocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2018-02-19)

It's never too late to start exercising, new study shows
Older people who have never taken part in sustained exercise programs have the same ability to build muscle mass as highly trained master athletes of a similar age, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2019-08-30)

The connection between diet, obesity, and cancer: Nutrition experts explore the evidence
About one third of cancer cases are estimated to be linked to dietary and other modifiable risk factors, especially for obesity-related cancers such as breast, colorectal, ovarian, endometrial, kidney, gallbladder, esophageal, and pancreatic cancers. In this special theme issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, food and nutrition practitioners and other health professionals take an in-depth look at the relationship between nutrition, obesity, and cancer prevention, treatment, and survival and identify research gaps for future prevention research efforts. (2018-03-27)

Recreating the wild: De-extinction, technology, and the ethics of conservation
A new Hastings Center special report examines efforts to revive extinct species. (2017-08-04)

Treating Lyme disease: When do symptoms resolve in children?
Mattia Chason, M.D., and colleagues in infectious disease examined how quickly Lyme disease symptoms typically resolve in children, a research question that has received little prior study. (2017-06-23)

Body size may influence women's lifespan more than it does men's
Body size-height and weight- may influence women's lifespan far more than it does men's, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2019-01-21)

Solving fossil mystery could aid quest for ancient life on Mars
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. (2019-11-27)

Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the disease
Many wives of advanced prostate cancer sufferers feel that their lives are being undermined by their husband's illness, with nearly half reporting that their own health suffered. In addition a focus subgroup has revealed that many feel isolated and fearful, and worry about the role change in their lives as their husband's cancer advances. This study, is amongst the first carried out on how prostate cancer affects the partners of sufferers. It was presented yesterday at the EAU conference in Copenhagen. (2018-03-19)

Exercise can outweigh harmful effects of air pollution
New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that the beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution. (2015-03-30)

Study highlights need for strength training in older women to ward off effects of aging
Study looked at 46 women across two different age ranges, 60-74 and 75-90, to learn how physical activity affects frailty differently in the two groups. (2018-04-23)

Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia
Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a study published in the February 20, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Mental activities included reading, playing instruments, singing in a choir, visiting concerts, gardening, doing needlework or attending religious services. (2019-02-20)

Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say. (2019-12-06)

Study raises questions about role of leisure activity in dementia
Studies have suggested that taking part in leisure activities such as playing cards or gardening may be associated with a lower risk of developing dementia. But a new study found no association between taking part in leisure activities at age 56 and the risk of dementia over the next 18 years. The study is published in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

Researchers assess contaminants in New York City's community gardens
While community gardens provide benefits including urban green space, opportunities for recreation, art expression, social gathering, and improved diets, urban gardening may also increase the opportunity for exposure to common urban soil contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (2015-12-07)

Using venomous proteins to make insect milkshakes
In a just-published paper in the journal PLOS Pathogens, Adler Dillman, an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside and several collaborators found that nematodes secrete a deadly cocktail of proteins to kill many insects that damage crops. The finding overturns a long-held belief that it is exclusively bacteria, working in conjunction with nematodes, that kill the insects. (2017-04-20)

Keep moving to prevent major mobility disability
According to research, being physically inactive is the strongest risk factor for disability as we age. A team of researchers created a study to examine the effects of performing light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on older adults. The researchers were interested in studying how participating in these different intensities of activity, and whether a person spreads their physical activity throughout the day, affects the chances for developing a major mobility disability. (2020-06-11)

Deadly behavior-modifying weapon identified in insect-world chemical arms race
New research from the University of East Anglia joins the dots between zombie ants, an insect-world arms race and the search for new antibiotics. Scientists probing one of the mysteries of the insect world identified a powerful chemical weapon used in the arms race between fungus-farming leafcutter ants and the parasites that plague them. It is hoped that the findings will help scientists search for new antibiotics from this unique battlefield. (2018-06-07)

MSU Geographer studied changes of weather in Moscow over the last century and a quarter
A researcher from Lomonosov Moscow State University's Faculty of Geography Mikhail Lokoshchenko has discovered the complex nature of changes in temperature and relative humidity in Moscow over the period of many years, from the end of the 19th century to the present day. The results were published in Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. (2017-10-17)

Well-kept vacant lots can help reduce crime
Maintaining the yards of vacant properties helps reduce crime rates in urban neighborhoods, indicates a new Michigan State University study that's the most comprehensive to date. (2017-04-18)

Communal activities boost rehabilitation for older adults in long term care
A group of researchers has developed a new program showing participation and activity is critical for the rehabilitation of older adults in long-term care. (2021-02-19)

Physical activity, mood and serious mental illness
Indiana University researchers combined experience sampling during random signaling throughout the day with physical activity measures recorded on study participants' accelerometers. They found that even low levels of physical activity improved mood for people with serious mental illness, such as bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia. A challenge, they say, is to find everyday activities to help this population, which typically has low levels of activity, become more active and engaged. (2009-01-14)

Maternal insecticide use during pregnancy and neonatal jaundice
Association between pesticide usage during pregnancy and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring treatment: The Japan Environment and Children's study. (2020-08-28)

New Papua New Guinea research solves archaeological mysteries
New research which 'fills in the blanks' on what ancient Papuan New Guineans ate, and how they processed food, has ended decades-long speculation on tool use and food stables in the highlands of New Guinea several thousand years ago. (2020-06-03)

In pandemic, people are turning to nature - especially women
One of the first studies on our relationship with nature during COVID finds significant increases in outdoor activity, especially among women. Women were 1.7 (gardening) to 2.9 (walking) times more likely to report increasing their activity compared to men. In general, outdoor activities seeing the largest increases were: watching wildlife, gardening, photos or art in nature, relaxing alone outside, and walking. (2020-12-16)

What will make grandma use her Fitbit longer?
For older adults, Fitbits and other activity trackers may be popular gifts, but they may not be used for very long. While counterintuitive, engaging in competition with family and friends decreases the odds of long-term use among older adults, perhaps because they feel it's demotivating, according to a new Michigan State University study. (2019-11-18)

Women active a few times weekly have lower risk of heart disease, stroke and blood clots
Middle-aged women physically active a few times per week have lower risks of heart disease, stroke and blood clots than inactive women. More frequent physical activity does not appear to lower the risks further. (2015-02-16)

Aging men: More uplifts, fewer hassles until the age of 65-70
A new study of how men approach their golden years found that how happy individuals are remains relatively stable for some 80 percent of the population, but perceptions of unhappiness -- or dealing with 'hassles' -- tends to get worse once you are about 65-70 years old. Possible causes are health issues, cognitive decline or the loss of a spouse or friends. (2014-02-19)

The many health benefits of gardening for elderly women
Researchers assessed physical and psychological health benefits of a 15-session gardening intervention for women age 70 and older. Physical and psychological health parameters were assessed before and after the intervention for participants and a control group (nonparticipants). Women in the intervention group exhibited significantly improved muscle mass, aerobic endurance, hand dexterity, cognitive ability, and decreased waist circumference compared to the control group. Participants also reported a significantly higher amount of daily physical activity from gardening. (2016-10-10)

Allotment gardeners reap healthy rewards
People who have an allotment, especially those aged over 60, tend to be significantly healthier than those who do not. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Environmental Health have shown that the small gardens were associated with increased levels of physical activity at all ages, and improved health and well-being in more elderly people. (2010-11-22)

Gardening helps to grow positive body image
New research has found that allotment gardening promotes positive body image, which measures someone's appreciation of their own body and its functions, and an acceptance of bodily imperfections. (2020-04-02)

Physical activity associated with reduced risk for obesity in genetically predisposed
Individuals who have a genetic mutation associated with high body mass index may be able to offset their increased risk for obesity through physical activity, according to a report in the Sept. 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. (2008-09-08)

Findings presented on Alzheimer's disease, brain gymnastics, and lead
Keeping physically or mentally active outside of work in midlife may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, according to research at Case Western Reserve University. Research also has shown that people who have worked in jobs with high levels of lead exposure are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease. (2000-07-26)

Physically active older veterans fall more, but hurt themselves less
Active older veterans fall more often than their more sedentary peers who never served in the armed forces, but they're less likely to injure themselves when they do, says a University of Michigan researcher. (2020-04-14)

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