Popular Gene News and Current Events

Popular Gene News and Current Events, Gene News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)

New features of a gene defect that affects muzzle length and caudal vertebrae in dogs
A recent genetic study at the University of Helsinki provides new information on the occurrence of a DVL2 gene defect associated with a screw tail and its relevance to canine constitution and health. The variant was found in several Bulldog and Pit Bull type breeds, and it was shown to result in caudal vertebral anomalies and shortening of the muzzle. The DLV2 variant may also affect the development of the heart. (2021-02-23)

Microglia turned on
Part of the immune system in the brain is made up of so-called microglia cells. Korean and Singaporean researchers have now developed a fluorescent probe that specifically labels this type of macrophage. The cells were visualized in cell culture and in the live brains of rodents. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a gene product expressed in microglia triggers the probe into a fluorescing state, which is detected through live-cell fluorescence imaging. (2019-05-27)

UIC researchers invent new gene-editing tool
Researchers have discovered a new gene-editing technique that allows for the programming of sequential cuts -- or edits -- over time. (2021-02-23)

Symphony of genes
One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. It has long been unclear whether the arrangement of these genes in the genome also had a certain function. In a recent study, biologists show that not only individual genes but also these gene arrangements in the genome have played a key role in the course of animal evolution. (2019-08-05)

Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes. (2018-01-12)

Promising gene replacement therapy moves forward at Ohio State
Research led by Dr. Krystof Bankiewicz, who recently joined The Ohio State University College of Medicine, shows that gene replacement therapy for Niemann-Pick type A disease is safe for use in nonhuman primates and has therapeutic effects in mice. These findings will publish online in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Prior to joining Ohio State as a professor of neurosurgery, Bankiewicz conducted this translational gene therapy research at the University of California at San Francisco. (2019-08-21)

Scientists move closer to treatment for Huntington's disease
Researchers show that a new version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system -- a modern tool for editing DNA -- is safer and more specific than versions previously used to remove the disease-causing DNA sequence in the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease. The study, which was carried out in cellular models from a Huntington's patient, brings a possible treatment for this currently incurable genetic disease one step closer. (2018-02-26)

A novel precision cancer model opens doors to personalized cancer treatment
Researchers from the Seve Ballesteros Foundation-CNIO Brain Tumour Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have developed an extremely powerful and versatile mouse model that will improve cancer research and accelerate preclinical testing of novel targeted therapies. Their work appears in Nature Communications. (2018-04-13)

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?
New research, led by Professor Anna deFazio from the Westmead Institute and Westmead Hospital, has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. (2018-02-15)

Gene expression patterns may help determine time of death
International team of scientists led by Roderic Guigó at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona shows that changes in gene expression in different tissues can be used to predict the time of death of individuals. Their results, which are published in Nature Communications this week, may have implications for forensic analyses. (2018-02-13)

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes. (2018-07-06)

The genetic signature of memory
Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work recently published in eNeuro increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation. (2019-12-09)

How plants conquered the land
Research at the University of Leeds has identified a key gene that assisted the transition of plants from water to the land around 500 million years ago. (2016-05-19)

Financial stress is associated with migraine, if you have specific circadian gene variants
People with a specific variation in the CLOCK gene have more migraines under financial stress. This work, the first time that the genetics of circadian rhythms has been shown to have an effect on migraine, is presented at the ECNP conference in Paris. (2017-09-02)

Research reveals how estrogen regulates gene expression
The sequential recruitment of coactivators to the estrogen receptor complex results in dynamic specific structural and functional changes that are necessary for effective regulation of gene expression. (2017-08-24)

New disease gene will lead to better screening for pediatric heart disease
Cardiomyopathy, or a deterioration of the ability of the heart muscle to contract, generally leads to progressive heart failure. It is frequently inherited, and, because approximately 40 percent of children born with it are likely to die within five years of diagnosis, being able to identify its genetic basis is particularly important. Now, an international team of researchers has identified a new disease gene which is implicated in the development of severe pediatric cardiomyopathies. (2016-05-23)

Breakthrough brings gene-editing medicine one step closer to patient applications
Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a way to greatly improve the accuracy of gene-editing technology by replacing the natural guide molecule it uses with a synthetic one called a bridged nucleic acid, or BNA. The research promises to bring the technology much closer to therapeutic reality. (2018-04-13)

Interview with CAR T cell expert Dr. Michel Sadelain in Human Gene Therapy
Michel Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, offers a fascinating perspective on the re-markable progress being made in the field of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T-cell therapies to treat cancer. (2018-05-21)

Systems biology approach identifies nutrient regulation of biological clock in plants
Using a systems biological analysis of genome-scale data from the model plant Arabidopsis, an international team of researchers identified that the master gene controlling the biological clock is sensitive to nutrient status. The study will appear in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2008-03-14)

Research test identifies BRCA2 gene mutations that lead to breast, ovarian cancers
A new test developed by researchers at Mayo Clinic shows which mutations in the BRCA2 gene make women susceptible to developing breast or ovarian cancers. The research behind the test was published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2018-01-25)

Genetic changes caused by environmental factors linked to suicide risk
Researchers have linked genetic changes in the so-called CRH gene, which affects the regulation of the body's stress system, to suicide risk and psychiatric illness. The study of epigenetic changes in the body's hormone-based stress system has shown that stress-related changes in the CRH gene are linked to both serious suicide attempts in adults and psychiatric illness in adolescents. (2018-01-02)

Bristol researchers use gene editing to improve red blood cell transfusion compatibility
Synthetic biologists at the University of Bristol have succeeded in generating laboratory-made red blood cells with rare blood group types that could one day be used to help patients who cannot be matched with donor blood. (2018-04-27)

New assay leads to step toward gene therapy for deaf patients
Scientists at have taken an important step toward gene therapy for deaf patients by developing a way to better study a large protein essential for hearing and finding a truncated version of it. (2017-09-18)

New work from Ron Crystal's lab on treating hereditary adrenal disorders
A new study has definitively shown that a single treatment with gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector gene delivery to replace the defective gene responsible for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) will only temporarily alleviate the hereditary disorder. (2018-03-29)

Preclinical study links gene to brain aneurysm formation
University of Cincinnati neurovascular researchers have identified a gene that -- when suppressed or completely absent -- may predispose a person to brain aneurysms. Todd Abruzzo, MD, and his colleagues demonstrated that (2007-08-07)

Modified mushrooms may yield human drugs
Mushrooms might serve as biofactories for the production of various beneficial human drugs, according to plant pathologists who have inserted new genes into mushrooms. (2007-06-22)

The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system
A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene -- which is expressed in immature blood cells -- does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia. (2017-11-22)

Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying up
The larva of the sleeping chironomid, Polypedilum vanderplanki -- a mosquito-like insect that inhabits semi-arid areas of Africa -- is well known for being able to come back to life after being nearly completely desiccated, losing up to 97 percent of its body's water content. Now, researchers have discovered that a gene called heat shock factor -- which is present in some form in nearly all living organisms on earth -- has been coopted by the species to survive desiccation. (2018-03-09)

Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO
A newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in The New England Journal of Medicine. (2018-03-08)

Small but distinct differences among species mark evolution of human brain
The most dramatic divergence between humans and other primates can be found in the brain, the primary organ that gives our species its identity. However, all regions of the human brain have molecular signatures very similar to those of our primate relatives, yet some regions contain distinctly human patterns of gene activity that mark the brain's evolution and may contribute to our cognitive abilities, a new Yale-led study has found. (2017-11-23)

Letting silenced genes speak
Stem cell researchers at UConn Health have reversed Prader-Willi syndrome in brain cells growing in the lab. The discovery provides clues that could lead to a treatment for Prader-Willi, a genetic disorder that silences genes necessary for normal brain function. Prader-Willi occurs in about one out of every 15,000 births, and is the most common genetic cause of life-threatening childhood obesity. (2018-01-25)

Rice plants evolve to adapt to flooding
Although water is essential for plant growth, excessive amounts can waterlog and kill a plant. In South and Southeast Asia, where periodic flooding occurs during the rainy season, the water depth can reach several meters for many months. (2018-07-12)

A new mutation in kidney disease
Osaka University researchers find an unexpected mutation in proteins of the exosome could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing the risk of kidney disease. (2017-06-14)

Researchers pinpoint gene responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism
Researchers found alterations of the gene thousand and one amino-acid kinase 2, known as TAOK2, plays a direct role in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. This is the first comprehensive study that supports previous research suggesting the involvement of this gene. (2018-03-05)

Cancer-resistant mouse discovered
A mouse resistant to cancer, even highly-aggressive types, has been created by researchers at the University of Kentucky. The breakthrough stems from a discovery by UK College of Medicine professor of radiation medicine Vivek Rangnekar and a team of researchers who found a tumor-suppressor gene called (2007-11-27)

Rutgers scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer
A recent study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. (2019-01-17)

Study identifies new target to prevent, treat alcoholism
New research conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, identifies a gene that could provide a new target for developing medication to prevent and treat alcoholism. Researchers unraveled a link between alcohol and how it modulates the levels of activity of this particular gene. Researchers discovered that when they increased the levels of the gene-encoded protein in mice, they reduced alcohol consumption by almost 50 percent without affecting the total amount of fluid consumed or their overall well-being. (2019-02-08)

Gene Drive Technology: Where is the future?
For this episode of BioScience Talks, we're joined by Gene Drive Committee co-chair James P. Collins of Arizona State University and committee member Joseph Travis of Florida State University. They fill us in on the specifics of the new committee report and on the future of gene drives. (2016-06-29)

Food cue-related brain activity linked to obesity?
A unique pattern of gene expression observed in rats may be linked to a conditioned desire for food and excessive food intake, an article published today in BMC Biology suggests. (2007-04-26)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.