Popular Genes News and Current Events

Popular Genes News and Current Events, Genes News Articles.
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Symphony of genes
One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. It has long been unclear whether the arrangement of these genes in the genome also had a certain function. In a recent study, biologists show that not only individual genes but also these gene arrangements in the genome have played a key role in the course of animal evolution. (2019-08-05)

Gene medication to help treat spinal cord injuries
The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats. After several months of treatment, rodents were able to use previously paralyzed limbs. Researchers at Kazan Federal University are now seeking pre-clinical trial investment. (2019-03-18)

Aequatus -- a free, open-source visualization tool enabling in-depth comparison of homologous genes
Aequatus -- a new bioinformatics tool developed at Earlham Institute -- is helping to give an in-depth view of syntenic information between different species, providing a system to better identify important, positively selected, and evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA. (2018-10-25)

'Filter' hones GWAS results to help researchers avoid dead ends
A genetics research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine has solved a dilemma facing researchers who use genomewide association studies (GWAS) by developing a new approach that strategically 'filters' which genes are worth further study. The researchers hope this strategy will accelerate the study of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and even addiction by helping researchers avoid 'dead-end paths.' They are optimistic that this strategy will gain widespread use and will save researchers time and money. (2018-03-05)

NIH researchers identify how eye loss occurs in blind cavefish
Loss of eye tissue in blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), which occurs within a few days of their development, happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes, according to a study led by the National Institutes of Health. Epigenetic regulation is a process where genes are turned off or on, typically in a reversible or temporary manner. This mechanism differs from genetic mutations, which are permanent changes in the DNA code. The study appears in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2018-05-29)

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes. (2018-07-06)

McMaster researchers find genes may 'snowball' obesity
The researchers looked at 37 genes that are well established as modulating the body mass in 75,230 adults with European ancestry and found the nine with the snowball effect. (2017-12-07)

Autism often associated with multiple new mutations
Most autism cases are in families with no previous history of the disorder. New mutations, that occur in offspring but not in their parents, might play a role. These mutations have now been found, not just in protein-coding genome areas, but also in regulatory regions. Many are in areas that influence gene activity in the brain's striatum, which coordinates motivation, planning and other aspects of cognition. (2017-10-12)

The genetic signature of memory
Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work recently published in eNeuro increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation. (2019-12-09)

Jumbled chromosomes may dampen the immune response to tumors
How well a tumor responds to immunotherapy may depend in part on whether its chromosomes are intact or in a state of disarray, a new study reports. The finding could help doctors better pinpoint which cancer patients would benefit from immunotherapy. (2017-01-19)

New insights into how the brain adapts to stress
New research led by the University of Bristol has found that genes in the brain that play a crucial role in behavioural adaptation to stressful challenges are controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. (2016-04-11)

Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations
Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature. (2018-01-19)

Northeastern researchers identify 36 new genes implicated in cardiac disease
A Northeastern University professor has developed a new personalized method to discover genes implicated in complex diseases. One of the ultimate goals of the research is to create personalized therapeutic drugs to reverse heart disease. (2018-03-07)

Metagenomic analysis software reveals new causes of superbug emergence
Researchers from ITMO University and Center of Physical and Chemical Medicine developed an algorithm capable of tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota DNA and revealed additional evidence of resistance genes transfer between different bacterial species. The method can not only contribute to the development of effective therapy schemes, but also curb the spread of superbugs. The results of the research were published in 'Bioinformatics' journal. (2017-11-09)

Study finds hundreds of genes and genetic codes that regulate genes tied to alcoholism
Using rats carefully bred to either drink large amounts of alcohol or to spurn it, researchers at Indiana and Purdue universities have identified hundreds of genes that appear to play a role in increasing the desire to drink alcohol. (2016-08-04)

Insomnia genes found
An international team of researchers has found, for the first time, seven risk genes for insomnia. With this finding the researchers have taken an important step towards the unraveling of the biological mechanisms that cause insomnia. In addition, the finding proves that insomnia is not, as is often claimed, a purely psychological condition. Today, Nature Genetics publishes the results of this research. (2017-06-12)

Genetic effects are influenced by lifestyle
The risk for developing obesity is influenced by our lifestyle as well as our genes. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that our genetic risk for obesity is not static, but is influenced by our lifestyle. Results from the study have been published in the scientific journal PLOS Genetics. (2017-09-06)

Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new research
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. A new study, carried out in the Department of Plant Sciences, together with international colleagues, has shown for the first time that DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR), which corrects mutations that arise during the replication of the genome during cell division, is targeted to particular regions of the genome, and preferentially repairs genes. (2018-01-05)

Study examines link between epilepsy and mood disorders
Mood disorders, including depression, are the most common comorbid conditions in individuals with epilepsy, but the cause remains unclear. Results from a new Epilepsia study suggest that there may be a shared genetic susceptibility to these conditions, expressed only in people with focal epilepsy (in which seizures start in one part of the brain). (2018-01-11)

How the malarial parasite is evading our arsenal of drugs
A team of researchers has identified numerous mutations that allow the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum to become resistant to treatment. Knowing the identity of genes that impart multidrug resistance is important for the design of new drugs, and for understanding how existing therapeutics can lose their efficacy in clinical settings. (2018-01-11)

UMD researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertility
A UMD researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for male infertility. Findings set the stage for chickens as a more prominent model organism for stem cell research. (2018-04-30)

Uncovering a reversible master switch for development
In a paper published in Genes & Development, BWH principal investigator Mitzi Kuroda, PhD, and her team identified a reversible 'master switch' on most developmental genes. The team unearthed this biological insight through studies in the fruit fly -- a powerful model organism for studying how human genes are organized and function. (2017-11-13)

More genes are active in high-performance maize
When two maize inbred lines are crossed with each other, an interesting effect occurs: The hybrid offspring have a significantly higher yield than either of the two parent plants. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now investigated a number of genetically distinct hybrids. They showed that the offspring had many more active genes than the original parents. These results may help in the cultivation of even higher-yielding maize varieties. (2018-01-18)

Anxiety-depressive disorder changes brain genes activity
Russian neuroscientists discovered that anxiety-depressive disorder in mice is associated with impaired energy metabolism in the brain. The obtained data provides a fresh look at the depression development mechanism and other psycho-emotional diseases formation. The results of the study supported by Russian Science Foundation are published in the BMC Neuroscience. (2019-01-07)

Genetic body/brain connection identified in genomic region linked to autism
For the first time, Whitehead Institute scientists have documented a direct link between deletions in two genes--fam57ba and doc2a--in zebrafish and certain brain and body traits, such as seizures, hyperactivity, large head size, and increased fat content. Both genes reside in the 16p11.2 region of the genome, which has been linked to multiple brain and body disorders in humans, including autism spectrum disorder, developmental delays, seizures, and obesity. (2017-10-06)

Scientists make it possible to rank the risk of resistance genes
A new study published in Nature Communications will help to predict antibiotic resistance evolution and thus guide future drug development. (2018-02-06)

New receptor genes turn T-cells into powerful liver cancer foes
Mouse genes that make human T cells powerful at fighting liver cancer could one day help patients do the same, scientists report. Georgia Cancer Center scientists exposed mice genetically manipulated to respond to human antigens to a common antigen found in human liver cancer. (2018-04-03)

A hair-trigger for cells fighting infection
In response to infection the immune system produces unique antibodies to target each illness. To make these new antibodies, cells in the immune system must intentionally damage their own genes, meaning they run the risk of becoming cancer cells. New research from the Babraham Institute reveals how a proteins called Tia1 acts as a hair-trigger for DNA repair, allowing the immune system to walk the line between health and harm. (2017-09-13)

How lifestyle affects our genes
In the past decade, knowledge of how lifestyle affects our genes, a research field called epigenetics, has grown exponentially. Researchers at Lund University have summarised the state of scientific knowledge within epigenetics linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes in a review article published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism. (2019-04-23)

Color vision variation in guppies influences female mate preference
A variety of animals have male-specific ornament traits and these ornaments are favored by female choice. Which male traits are preferred by females often varies among females. Genetic mechanisms that create and maintain variations in female preference has been one of the central questions in evolutionary ecology. (2018-11-19)

Genomic recycling: Ancestral genes take on new roles
How some genes lost the ability to make proteins -- and gained regulatory powers. (2017-09-18)

New genes on 'deteriorating' Y chromosome
Decoding Y chromosomes is difficult even with latest sequencing technologies. The question which genes lie on the chromosome and where they came from is hotly debated. Using a new analysis method, scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna made a crucial breakthrough. They showed that genetic material in fruit flies is often transferred to the Y chromosome from other chromosomes. Although largely a result of 'accidents', some of these transfers create functional genes. Published in PNAS. (2017-10-25)

Feeling sleepy is all in your genes
Genes responsible for our 24-hour body clock influence not only the timing of sleep, but also appear to be central to the actual restorative process of sleep, according to research published in the online open access journal BMC Neuroscience. The study identified changes in the brain that lead to the increased desire and need for sleep during time spent awake. (2007-10-17)

The fate of Neanderthal genes
The Neanderthals disappeared about 30,000 years ago, but little pieces of them live on in the form of DNA sequences scattered through the modern human genome. A new study by geneticists at UC Davis, shows why these traces of our closest relatives are slowly being removed by natural selection. (2016-11-08)

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins
While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. A new study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, describes a new concept of how these two cancers may evolve in a similar way and may eventually lead to more effective therapies for both. (2016-05-23)

Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying up
The larva of the sleeping chironomid, Polypedilum vanderplanki -- a mosquito-like insect that inhabits semi-arid areas of Africa -- is well known for being able to come back to life after being nearly completely desiccated, losing up to 97 percent of its body's water content. Now, researchers have discovered that a gene called heat shock factor -- which is present in some form in nearly all living organisms on earth -- has been coopted by the species to survive desiccation. (2018-03-09)

Same genes could make us prone to both happiness and depression
Researchers from Oxford and UT Austin suggest that while no gene 'causes' mental ill health, some genes can make people more sensitive to the effects of their environment -- for better and for worse -- leading to both mental ill health and enhanced mental resilience. (2016-07-19)

Cells rockin' in their DNA
Kyoto University Researcher find that some mechanosensitive genes are suppressed when subjected to audible sound. (2018-01-31)

Sorting out risk genes for brain development disorders
Gene discovery research is uncovering similarities and differences underlying a variety of disorders affecting the developing brain, including autism, attention deficits, tics, intellectual impairments, developmental delays and language difficulties. Researchers found some genes are more closely associated with autism and others with intellectual impairments, but many times there is overlap, indicating some genes pose broader risks. Certain genes were detected only in males with high-functioning autism. (2017-02-22)

Inflammation, depression and antidepressant response: Common mechanisms
In findings published electronically in Molecular Psychiatry, researchers from University of Miami found polymorphisms in inflammation-related genes that are associated with susceptibility to major depression and antidepressant response. Two genes critical for T cell function in the immune system have been associated with susceptibility for major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment response: PSMB4 (proteasome beta 4 subunit) and TBX21 (T-bet). (2008-05-29)

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