Popular Genes News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Genes News and Current Events, Genes News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Genes that regulate how much we dream
Sleep is known to allow animals to re-energize themselves and consolidate memories. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is known to play an important role in maintaining a healthy mental and physical life, but the molecular mechanisms behind this state are barely understood. Now, an international research team led by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan has identified a pair of genes that regulate how much REM and non-REM sleep an animal experiences. (2018-08-28)

Genome editing method targets AIDS virus
By destroying the regulatory genes of the AIDS virus HIV-1 using the genome editing system CRISPR/Cas9, a Japanese research group has succeeded in blocking the production of HIV-1 by infected cells. (2018-05-18)

Genetic screen identifies genes that protect cells from Zika virus
A new Tel Aviv University study uses a genetic screen to identify genes that protect cells from Zika viral infection. The research may one day lead to the development of a treatment for Zika and other infections. (2019-07-25)

Genome of wheat ancestor sequenced
Sequencing the bread wheat genome has long been considered an almost insurmountable task, due to its enormous size and complexity. Now, an international team of scientists led by researchers at the University of California, Davis, has come a step closer to solving the puzzle by sequencing the genome of a wild ancestor of bread wheat known as Aegilops tauschii, a type of goatgrass. (2017-11-15)

Study unravels the genetics of childhood 'overgrowth'
Researchers have undertaken the world's largest genetic study of childhood overgrowth syndromes -- providing new insights into their causes, and new recommendations for genetic testing. (2017-05-04)

Newly revealed autism-related genes include genes involved in cancer
Researchers in Italy have applied a computational technique that accounts for how genes interact, to find new networks of related genes that may be involved in autism spectrum disorder. Some of the genes have not been previously linked to the disorder, and could help scientists to better understand it and develop new treatments. (2017-09-25)

Discovery of a new fusion gene class may affect the development of cancer
Cancer researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new class of fusion genes with properties that affect and may drive the development of cancer. (2017-10-05)

Andalusian experts discover new procedures for DNA stability
In eukaryotic cells the proximity of the genes to the nuclear pores, which are found in the nuclear membrane, contributes to maintaining the integrity of the genome. This is due to the fact that the anchoring of DNA to the pore during transcription avoids the formation of DNA-RNA hybrids, which are a natural source of DNA breaks and genome instability. (2017-11-16)

Aging has distinct and opposite effects on tendon in males and females
New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Scientific Reports, has identified that in tendon aging has distinct and opposite effects on the genes expressed in males and females. (2017-10-31)

Why some genes are highly expressed
The DNA in our cells is folded into millions of small packets, like beads on a string, allowing our two-meter linear DNA genomes to fit into a nucleus of only about 0.01 mm in diameter. However, these molecular beads, called nucleosomes, render DNA 'unreadable.' They thus need to be temporarily displaced to allow genes to be copied ('transcribed') into the messages that are used to make proteins. (2015-11-05)

Fifteen new genes identified that shape our face
Researchers from KU Leuven (Belgium) and the universities of Pittsburgh, Stanford, and Penn State (US) have identified fifteen genes that determine our facial features. The findings were published in Nature Genetics. (2018-02-19)

Progress in refining the genetic causes of schizophrenia
An international study led by the University of Exeter Medical School has made advances in understanding the ways in which genetic risk factors alter gene function in schizophrenia. (2016-08-29)

Sheep gene insights could help farmers breed healthier animals
Fresh insights into the genetic code of sheep could aid breeding programmes to improve their health and productivity. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute have mapped which genes are turned on and off in the different tissues and organs in a sheep's body. (2017-09-18)

How genes affect tobacco and alcohol use
A new study gives insight into the complexity of genetic and environmental factors that compel some of us to drink and smoke more than others. (2019-02-21)

Neuroprotective mechanisms of gene and cell therapy of spinal cord injuries
Genetically modified stem and progenitor cells overexpressing NTFs have recently attracted special attention of researchers and are most promising for the purposes of regenerative medicine. Therefore, we have studied the effect of genetically modified human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells on the expression of stem cell molecular determinants in spinal cord injuries. (2018-03-06)

Study advances gene therapy for glaucoma
In a study published today in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kaufman and Curtis Brandt, a fellow professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at UW-Madison, showed an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's fluid drain, called the trabecular meshwork. It could lead to a treatment for glaucoma. (2018-01-16)

New alcohol genes uncovered
Do you have what is known as problematic alcohol use? Then statistically you will also be particularly genetically predisposed to develop e.g. depression and insomnia. And to become dependent on drugs and tobacco. This is shown by a new international study in which researchers from iPSYCH are involved. (2020-06-04)

Cold virus found to manipulate genes
Sneezing, runny nose and chills? You might blame the human rhinovirus, which causes 30 to 50 percent of common colds. But in reality, it's not the virus itself but HRV's ability to manipulate your genes that is the true cause of some of the most annoying cold symptoms. (2008-10-24)

Protecting rice crops at no extra cost
A newly identified genetic mechanism in rice can be utilized to maintain resistance to a devastating disease, without causing the typical tradeoff -- a decrease in grain yield, a new study reports. (2017-02-02)

The silence of the genes
Research led by Dr. Keiji Tanimoto from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, has brought us closer to understanding the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of genomic imprinting. In this intriguing event, one copy of a gene is 'turned off,' or silenced, depending on whether it was derived from the mother or the father. (2015-11-24)

Gene which decreases risk of social network-related stress, increases finance-related stress risk
Researchers have discovered that the same gene which increases your risk of depression following financial stress as you grow older also reduces your chance of depression associated with friendship and relationships stresses when young- your social network. This may have implications for treatment, but also offers a possible answer to a question which has puzzled scientists: why has depression survived through evolution? This work is presented at the ECNP Congress in Barcelona. (2018-10-06)

New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results are presented in the scientific journal mBio. (2019-06-04)

Researcher discovers commonalities in brains of people with HD and PD
A new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases. (2018-01-12)

Redefining 'species'
What is a species? Biologists -- and ornithologists in particular -- have been debating the best definition for a very long time. A new commentary published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances proposes a novel concept: that species can be defined based on the unique coadaptations between their two genomes, one in the nuclei of their cells and the other in their mitochondria. (2017-03-08)

The origin of flower making genes
A research team led by Professor Mitsuyasu Hasebe of the National Institute for Basic Biology revealed that the MADS-box genes control sperm motility and cell division and elongation of the stem of gametophores, using the moss Physcomitrella patens. (2018-01-10)

Scientists link genes to brain anatomy in autism
A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has discovered that specific genes are linked to individual differences in brain anatomy in autistic children. (2018-02-27)

Depression study pinpoints genes that may trigger the condition
Nearly 80 genes that could be linked to depression have been discovered by scientists. (2018-04-16)

Wastewater reveals the levels of antibiotic resistance in a region
A comparison of seven European countries shows that the amount of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater reflects the prevalence of clinical antibiotic resistance in the region. However, modern wastewater treatment plants seem to be able to eliminate antibiotic resistance efficiently. (2019-03-27)

Natural selection is not the only process that drives evolution
Why have some of our genes evolved rapidly? It is widely believed that Darwinian natural selection is responsible, but research led by a group at Uppsala University, suggests that a separate neutral (nonadaptive) process has made a significant contribution to human evolution. Their results have been published today in the journal PLoS Biology. (2009-01-26)

Building disease-beating wheat
Disease resistance genes from three different grass species have been combined in the world's first (2007-12-12)

Big Data analysis identifies new cancer risk genes
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona developed a new method to systematically identify genes contributing to heritable cancer risk. Their work, which is published in Nature Communications, is a success story for data sharing and openness in science. Just three researchers identified new cancer genes only using publically available data. (2018-07-10)

Scientists find missing factor in gene activation
Scientists have unraveled a mystery on how genes are activated. Human genes are blocked by structures known as nucleosomes, components that package DNA inside cells. How do these roadblocks clear out to allow genes to be turned on? Scientists have identified a key factor that unravels nucleosomes and clears the way for gene activation. They say the finding is useful in understanding diseases such as cancer, which can be caused by improper gene activity. (2018-05-14)

New genetics clues into motor neuron disease
Researchers at the University of Queensland have contributed to the discovery of three new genes which increase the risk of motor neuron disease, opening the door for targeted treatments. (2016-07-25)

RefEx, a web tool for a comfortable search of reference data for gene expression analysis
A large variety of data of life science (such as gene expression) is accumulated in the public database, but it is difficult to use. A web tool RefEx can easily search gene expression data available in public databases to obtain reference data for genetic analysis without bench-top experiments. RefEx is expected to contribute widely and greatly to life science and medical research as a powerful tool for gene expression research. (2017-11-03)

A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island
Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry in Texas -- providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult policy challenges. Michigan Tech researcher Kristin Brzeski and others have identified red wolf ''ghost alleles'' in canid population on Galveston Island. (2018-12-11)

Malaria's most wanted: Identifying the deadliest strains to design a childhood vaccine
Researchers have identified a 'genetic fingerprint' associated with the most deadly strains of malaria parasites, making these unique DNA regions potential targets for vaccine development. (2018-03-20)

Ancient genes used to produce salt-tolerant wheat
Two recently discovered genes from an ancient wheat variety have led to a major advance in breeding new salt-tolerant varieties. (2007-02-01)

Researchers discover new pathway for handling stress
Researchers at the University of California San Diego studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response or 'IPR,' the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for animals to cope with certain types of stress and attacks, including heat shock. (2017-11-06)

Viruses can transfer genes across the superkingdoms of life
A new finds that viruses can transfer genes to organisms that they aren't known to infect, suggesting they can influence and interact with a much wider range of organisms than previously thought. The researchers also found that viruses and cellular organisms share a large group of genes that help cells to function, suggesting that viruses may have an ancient cell-like origin. (2017-12-18)

Two new genes discovered in the developmental defects of canine enamel
In addition to humans, hereditary disorders of enamel development occur in dogs, greatly impacting their dental health and wellbeing. A recent study reveals canine enamel disorders similar to those found in humans, linking them with ENAM and ACP4, two genes previously described in humans. (2019-03-29)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.