Popular Genetic Disease News and Current Events

Popular Genetic Disease News and Current Events, Genetic Disease News Articles.
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Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)

Genetic tool improves estimation of prostate cancer risk in diverse ethnic/racial groups
Scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine validated a more inclusive and comprehensive genetic tool, known as a polygenic hazard score (PHS), for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer. (2021-02-23)

DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)

Zebrafish study provides new insights into autism spectrum disorder research
Exposure to a compound used to treat migraines and seizures causes characteristics associated with autism, groundbreaking research with zebrafish has demonstrated. (2018-01-24)

CNIC scientists develop new methods for analyzing gene function
Scientists at the CNIC have developed new methods to produce and analyze genetic mosaics. In these mosaics, tissues contain various groups of cells with different known genotypes, permitting study of the differences that these genotypes generate in cell behavior. (2017-08-10)

Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. His discovery gives hope to Parkinson's patients. This research was done in collaboration with colleagues from Northern Illinois University and will be published this evening on the website of the authoritative journal Science. (2012-05-11)

Scientists move closer to treatment for Huntington's disease
Researchers show that a new version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system -- a modern tool for editing DNA -- is safer and more specific than versions previously used to remove the disease-causing DNA sequence in the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease. The study, which was carried out in cellular models from a Huntington's patient, brings a possible treatment for this currently incurable genetic disease one step closer. (2018-02-26)

New methods find undiagnosed genetic diseases in electronic health records
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have found a way to search genetic data in electronic health records to identify undiagnosed genetic diseases in large populations so treatments can be tailored to the actual cause of the illness. (2018-03-15)

Rhino genome results
A study by San Diego Zoo Global reveals that the prospects for recovery of the critically endangered northern white rhinoceros -- of which only three individuals remain -- will reside with the genetic resources that have been banked at San Diego Zoo Global's Frozen Zoo®. Frozen cell cultures housed here from nine northern white rhinos contain genetic variation that is missing in surviving individuals of this subspecies of rhinoceros, which is now extinct in the wild. (2017-01-25)

Impact of misunderstanding genetic tests for heart conditions
Patients who undergo genetic testing for inherited heart disease need to be better informed to know how to interpret the results and understand the impact the results will have on their life, a University of Sydney study has found. (2018-02-23)

A novel precision cancer model opens doors to personalized cancer treatment
Researchers from the Seve Ballesteros Foundation-CNIO Brain Tumour Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have developed an extremely powerful and versatile mouse model that will improve cancer research and accelerate preclinical testing of novel targeted therapies. Their work appears in Nature Communications. (2018-04-13)

Passenger pigeon case study: How even large, stable populations may be at risk for extinction
A new study on passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) genomics suggests that even species with large and stable populations can be at risk of extinction if there's a sudden environmental change. (2017-11-16)

Understanding vitamin D trends in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
New research charts vitamin D levels and variations in genes that determine vitamin D status in UK children diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (2018-05-15)

Brain-aging gene discovered
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a common genetic variant that greatly affects normal brain aging in older adults. The discovery may point toward new targets for preventing or treating age-associated brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (2017-03-15)

Why are minorities underrepresented in genetic cancer studies?
Socio-cultural and clinical factors as well as healthcare processes were important drivers of a woman's willingness to provide saliva specimens for future cancer research. This is according to Vanessa B. Sheppard of Virginia Commonwealth University's School of Medicine, lead author of a study in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship. (2017-11-16)

Huntington's Disease Mouse Model To Be Distributed By Jackson Laboratory
The first strain of mouse genetically engineered to model major symptoms of Huntington's disease -- an inherited, degenerative brain disease that affects an estimated 30,000 Americans -- is now undergoing processing at The Jackson Laboratory for distribution to researchers worldwide (1997-04-02)

The Down's syndrome 'super genome'
Only 20 percent of foetuses with trisomy 21 reach full term. But how do they manage to survive the first trimester of pregnancy despite this heavy handicap? Researchers from UNIGE and UNIL have found that children born with Down's syndrome have an excellent genome - better than the average genome of people without the genetic abnormality. It is possible that this genome offsets the disabilities caused by the extra chromosome, helping the foetus to survive. (2018-01-19)

Study finds hundreds of genes and genetic codes that regulate genes tied to alcoholism
Using rats carefully bred to either drink large amounts of alcohol or to spurn it, researchers at Indiana and Purdue universities have identified hundreds of genes that appear to play a role in increasing the desire to drink alcohol. (2016-08-04)

Early puberty linked with increased risk of obesity for women
Girls who start puberty earlier are more likely to be overweight as adults, finds new research from Imperial College London. (2018-03-15)

Genetic effects are influenced by lifestyle
The risk for developing obesity is influenced by our lifestyle as well as our genes. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that our genetic risk for obesity is not static, but is influenced by our lifestyle. Results from the study have been published in the scientific journal PLOS Genetics. (2017-09-06)

Mount Sinai study reveals new genetic link to heart disease
A collaboration involving the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the German Heart Center Munich, AstraZeneca, and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has demonstrated that more than 30 percent of heart disease risk stems from genetic factors, much more than was previously understood. The study findings introduce the biology of gene networks as a means to better understand the heritability and genetic underpinnings of heart disease. (2019-06-18)

Gluten intolerance appears largely undiagnosed in Canada
Research on a large sample of Canadians suggests that most people with celiac disease don't know they have it. (2017-10-06)

Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALS
University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. A study published today in Nature Communications details what the researchers describe as a vicious cycle of toxic protein production set in motion by cell stress. (2017-12-08)

Individual access to genomic disease risk factors has a beneficial impact on lifestyles
A large study from Finland shows that giving personal genomic information to individuals can have a long-term beneficial effect on their lifestyles. (2018-06-15)

New prostate cancer risk score could help guide screening decisions
A new score for predicting a man's genetic risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer could help guide decisions about who to screen and when, say researchers in The BMJ today. (2018-01-10)

Study: Exercise mitigates genetic effects of obesity later in life
A new study suggests, for the first time in women over age 70, that working up a sweat can reduce the influence one's genes have on obesity. (2018-06-04)

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species
Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows. (2018-04-12)

Researchers recommend specific diets for preventing colorectal cancer in high-risk groups
Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered that the amount of protein in our diet may be an important factor in the prevention of colorectal cancer in different risk groups. People already suffering from inflammatory bowel disease could benefit from a high-protein diet; however, in contrast, low protein consumption may be the best option for those people who have a genetic predisposition to develop colon cancer. (2017-12-21)

Landmark genetic study better predicts stomach cancer
Although stomach cancer is treatable if detected early, diagnosis often occurs at an advanced stage, resulting in high mortality. A new study by researchers at the National University Health System and Duke-NUS Medical School has identified genetic patterns in intestinal metaplasia (a precondition for stomach cancer) which help predict the development of this life-threatening cancer. The discovery could enable targeted screening and earlier detection of stomach cancer, leading to better patient outcomes. (2018-01-05)

Unprecedented study identifies 44 genetic risk factors for major depression
A global research project has mapped out the genetic basis of major depression, identifying 44 genetic variants which are risk factors for depression, 30 of which are newly discovered. The study, by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and co-led in the UK by King's College London, is the largest study to-date of genetic risk factors for major depression. (2018-04-26)

Cause of cancer form in the liver identified
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified the two genes whose mutation cause a serious cancer form found in the liver. The result sets concrete goals for future treatment of the otherwise incurable disease. (2017-10-12)

Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease
How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? Seeking an answer to this Question researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin examined the tumor genomes of nearly 300 prostate cancer patients. Their findings describe the ways in which changes in the prostate cells' genetic information pave the way for cancer development. Using a newly developed computer model, it is now possible to predict the course of the disease in individual patients. The results of this study were now published in Cancer Cell. (2018-12-14)

Hundreds of thousands of genomes shed light on psychiatric disorders
A massive undertaking by the Brainstorm Consortium to analyze the genomes of nearly 900,000 people has revealed important insights into the genetic overlap among some psychiatric diseases, as well as among personality traits. (2018-06-21)

Genetic heart diseases cause fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought, study finds
Genetic mutations linked to heart disease have been considered a leading cause of sudden infant death syndrome, but a new study by Mayo Clinic, British and Danish researchers finds they are to blame for far fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought. The findings are opening new lines of inquiry into possible causes of the syndrome and may help prevent unnecessary genetic testing of surviving family members. The study results appear in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2018-03-12)

Genetic modification and genome editing rely on active roles for researchers and industry
In a review published in the Journal of Dairy Science® authors from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences discuss potential applications of genetic modification and genome editing of cattle for food production, considering both the breeding program and its ethical aspects. The authors concluded that an active role by all those involved is necessary to support scientific developments. (2017-12-20)

A new mutation in kidney disease
Osaka University researchers find an unexpected mutation in proteins of the exosome could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing the risk of kidney disease. (2017-06-14)

Physical activity helps fight genetic risk of heart disease, Stanford-led study finds
Keeping fit, even if you're born with a high genetic risk for heart disease, still works to keep your heart healthy, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-04-09)

Largest-ever study of thyroid cancer genetics finds new mutations, suggests immunotherapy
Data from 583 patient samples of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and 196 anaplastic thyroid cancers, show new genetic alterations, and 'high mutation burden' that is an FDA-approved marker for treatment with immunotherapy. (2018-04-26)

Genetic counselors turn to unconventional counseling to meet demand for genetic testing
Imagine receiving genetic test results for a disease you could develop later in life without having anyone with whom to discuss your options for managing the risk. That's becoming a common occurrence as people turn to the Internet and other outlets for genetic testing without genetic counseling. In an effort to broaden accessibility to genetic counseling, researchers are exploring nonconventional counseling methods that challenge traditional approaches. (2008-03-17)

Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas
The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations. These conclusions were reached by an international team of researchers who sequenced eleven genomes from eastern gorilla specimens collected up to 100 years ago, and compared these with genomes from present-day individuals. The results are now published in Current Biology. (2018-12-27)

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