Popular Geological Survey News and Current Events

Popular Geological Survey News and Current Events, Geological Survey News Articles.
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Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to it
Sightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. A new Duke-led paper finds that far from being outliers, these sightings signify the return of highly adaptable predators to prime hunting grounds they occupied long ago -- a trend that opens new opportunities for future conservation. (2018-05-07)

Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, pharma, and biopharma employers
The Science and Science Careers' 2016 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics. Respondents to the web-based survey were asked to rate companies based on 23 characteristics, including financial strength, easy adaptation to change, and a research-driven environment. (2016-10-27)

'Problem of missing ice' finally solved by movement of the earth's crust
An international team of scientists published a study in Nature Communications today. This new reconstruction revolutionizes what is thought about the global continental ice mass during the Last Ice Age. (2021-02-23)

Wood frogs research clarifies risks posed to animals by warming climate
As conditions warm, fish and wildlife living at the southern edge of their species' ranges are most at risk, according to Penn State researchers who led a major collaborative study of how wood frogs are being affected by climate change. (2017-08-19)

How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycle
A previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. Better understanding of the slow carbon cycle will help us predict to what extent the continents, oceans and ocean crust will take up the extra human-induced rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the long run. (2018-02-14)

Nation's beekeepers lost 44 percent of bees in 2015-16
United States beekeepers lost 44 percent of their honey bee colonies from April 2015 to April 2016, according to the latest preliminary results of an annual nationwide survey. This is a higher overall loss rate than last year and marks the second consecutive survey year that summer loss rates rivaled winter loss rates. The survey is conducted by the Bee Informed Partnership in collaboration with the Apiary Inspectors of America, with funding from the USDA. (2016-05-10)

Traditional Amazonian drug linked to improved sense of wellbeing
A psychedelic drug traditionally used in South America improves people's general sense of wellbeing and may offer a treatment for alcoholism and depression, new research suggests. (2017-11-09)

Survey provides new directions for employment of people with disabilities
Survey findings indicate that the majority of employers have processes and practices in place for the inclusion of employees with and without disabilities, and that the commitment to the success of employees with disabilities is shared by supervisors and upper management. The findings offer insight into how effective these processes and practices are for all employees, and point to new directions for expanding their availability, and increasing their effectiveness for individuals with disabilities. (2017-10-10)

Attitudes of American public on service denial to same-sex and interracial couples
The first national survey of public attitudes on allowing businesses to deny service to same-sex couples reveals that Americans who support service refusal do so regardless of whether the denial is for religious or nonreligious reasons. Presently, legislatures and courts are debating whether businesses can deny services to same-sex couples for reasons that are (2017-12-20)

Ancient life form discovered in remote Tasmanian valley
A team of Tasmanian researchers has uncovered rare, living stromatolites deep within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. (2017-11-13)

Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, biopharma, and pharma employers
The Science and Science Careers' 2018 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics. Respondents to the web-based survey were asked to rate companies based on 23 characteristics, including financial strength, easy adaptation to change, and a research-driven environment. (2018-10-25)

Men actually recommend getting help for depression
Participants in a national survey read a scenario describing someone who had depressed symptoms. Men recommended talking to someone about their problems just as much as women did. (2015-12-16)

Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recovery
A new research article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists indicate the resurgence of underwater grasses supports nutrient reductions from EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) along with conservation incentives have resulted in a healthier Chesapeake Bay. (2018-03-05)

Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakaway
Since an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month, scientists have continued to track its progress using satellites. Their observations show the Larsen-C story might not be over yet. (2017-08-02)

Ocean floor geysers warm flowing sea water
An international team of earth scientists report movement of warmed sea water through the flat, Pacific Ocean floor off Costa Rica. The movement is greater than that off midocean volcanic ridges. The finding suggests possible marine life in a part of the ocean once considered barren. (2008-09-22)

Study warns that snake fungal disease could be a global threat
New research suggests that a potentially fatal snake fungus found in several species in the United States and three in Europe could be global in scale. The study shows that the snake fungal disease caused by Ophidiomyces ophidiodiicola can infect snakes of many species regardless of their ancestry, physical characteristics, or habitats. The study's authors warn that future surveys for the disease should assume that all snake species harbor this pathogen. (2017-12-20)

Lack of water is key stressor for urban trees
A recent study finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well -- unless they are thirsty. Insufficient water not only harms trees, but allows other problems to have an outsized effect on trees in urban environments. (2018-03-13)

World's largest volcanic range may lurk beneath Antarctic ice
West Antarctica's vast ice sheet conceals what may be the largest volcanic region on earth, research has revealed. (2017-08-14)

Ophthalmologists increasingly dissatisfied with electronic health records
Ophthalmologists' use of electronic health records (EHR) systems for storing and accessing patients' medical histories more than doubled between 2006 and 2016, while their perceptions of financial and clinical productivity following EHR implementation declined, a study published today in JAMA Ophthalmology shows. (2017-12-28)

Burnout, depression can affect ophthalmology residents, study finds
A Brown University undergraduate led a JAMA Ophthalmology study showing that many ophthalmology residents face burnout and are often unable to participate in wellness initiatives, which has adverse consequences for both residents and patients. (2018-05-04)

Conservation endocrinology in a changing world
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-05-10)

The Red Planet is severely gassed out
New measurements of Mars' thin atmosphere show that most of it has been lost to space due to bombardment from solar wind; this was the likely driver of the transition in Martian climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today's cold, dry, thin atmosphere. (2017-03-30)

Increases in obesity, severe obesity continue among adults in US
Obesity and severe obesity continued to grow among adults in the United States between 2007-2008 and 2015-2016 but there were no significant overall changes among youth. (2018-03-23)

Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third, say dairy farmers
Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Those questioned also think that over the next five years they could cut their own antibiotic use by almost one-third in dry cow therapy and one-fifth in clinical mastitis. (2016-10-06)

Changes in reef latitude
Researchers have hypothesized that nutrient levels rather than temperature are the main factor controlling the latitudinal bounds of coral reefs, but the issue remains controversial. New results from a South Florida reef survey strongly support this hypothesis, suggesting human activities are reducing the areas where corals can survive. (2006-02-22)

Most PA students tobacco-free, but vaping and cigarette use still a concern
Most of Pennsylvania's high school and middle school students are tobacco-free, but among those who do use tobacco products, the most commonly used product by middle schoolers was e-cigarettes -- also known as vaping -- and the most commonly used product by high schoolers was cigarettes. (2018-02-26)

Study shows polar bear metabolic rates are higher than previously predicted
A new study on polar bear metabolism, behavior, and foraging success sheds important light on their energy demands. The study, published in the journal Science, found that polar bears have metabolic rates greater than previously predicted and greater than other terrestrial mammals of similar size. The study reinforces the understanding that polar bears are reliant on a diet of fat-rich seals to survive in the energetically-demanding Arctic. (2018-02-01)

Geoscientists suggest 'snowball Earth' resulted from plate tectonics
About 700 million years ago, the Earth experienced unusual episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as 'Snowball Earth.' In a new study published in the April issue of the journal Terra Nova, two geologists at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Austin suggest that those major climate changes can be linked to one thing: the advent of plate tectonics. (2018-05-07)

Scientists to build the avian tree of life
With the support of the National Science Foundation, scientists have embarked on a large-scale project to build the evolutionary tree of all bird species using cutting-edge technologies to collect DNA from across the genome. This project, called OpenWings, will produce the most complete evolutionary tree of any vertebrate group to-date. (2018-04-11)

Extinction by asteroid a rarity
Results presented at 2008 Joint Annual Meeting argue in favor of a (2008-10-06)

Retreat of the ice followed by millennia of methane release
Methane was seeping from the seafloor for thousands of years following the retreat of the Barents Sea ice sheet, shows a groundbreaking new study in Nature Communications. (2016-05-13)

Scientists identified earthquake faults in Sichuan, China
Only last summer research published by earth scientists in the international journal Tectonics concluded that geological faults in the Sichuan Basin, China, (2008-05-16)

New study sheds light on Moon's slow retreat from frozen Earth
A study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers provides new insight into the Moon's excessive equatorial bulge, a feature that solidified in place over four billion years ago as the Moon gradually distanced itself from the Earth. (2018-02-06)

Primary care clinicians' willingness to care for transgender patients
A new survey finds that most family medicine and general internal medicine clinicians are willing to provide routine care for transgender patients. (2018-11-12)

New stellar streams confirm 'melting pot' history of the galaxy
Public release of Dark Energy Survey data continues trend toward 'Big Data' in astronomy. (2018-01-10)

Mass extinction with prior warning
Mass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that they occurred during a short period of time in geological terms. In a new study, FAU paleobiologists and their research partners have now shown that signs that the largest mass extinction event in the Earth's history was approaching became apparent much earlier than previously believed, and point out that the same indicators can be observed today. (2018-03-27)

Loss of work productivity in a warming world
Heat stress affects the health of workers and reduces the work productivity by changing the ambient working environment thus leading to economic losses. Scientists identified the regions of vulnerability to heat waves that might have been overlooked in the past. (2018-10-26)

Good sexual intercourse lasts minutes, not hours, therapists say
Satisfactory sexual intercourse for couples lasts from 3 to 13 minutes, contrary to popular fantasy about the need for hours of sexual activity, according to a survey of US and Canadian sex therapists. (2008-03-31)

Scouting the eagles: Proof that protecting nests aids reproduction
Reproduction among bald eagles in a remote national park in Minnesota was aided when their nests were protected from human disturbance, according to a study published today (Jan. 9, 2018) in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2018-01-09)

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