Popular Germanium News and Current Events

Popular Germanium News and Current Events, Germanium News Articles.
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2-D tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulator
An international research team led by Nagoya University synthesized planar stanene: 2-D sheets of tin atoms, analogous to graphene. Tin atoms were deposited onto the Ag(111) surface of silver. The stanene layer remained extremely flat, unlike in previous studies wherein stanene was buckled. This leads to the formation of large area, high quality samples. Stanene is predicted to be a topological insulator, with applications in quantum computing and nanoelectronics. (2018-01-19)

Scientists demonstrated 1.3 μm submilliamp threshold quantum dot micro-lasers on Si
A group of researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara, successfully demonstrated record-small electrically pumped micro-lasers epitaxially grown on industry standard (001) silicon substrates in a recent study. A submilliamp threshold of 0.6 mA, emitting at the near-infrared (1.3?m) was achieved for a micro-laser with a radius of 5 μm. The thresholds and footprints are orders of magnitude smaller than those previously reported lasers epitaxially grown on Si. (2017-09-18)

New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating
A new simple, cost-effective approach that may open up an effective way to make other metallic/semiconducting nanomaterials. (2016-01-30)

A new way to atomically thin materials
Metallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more expensive, titanium aluminum carbide, they selectively etch silicon out of titanium silicon carbide, a cheaper and more common precursor, to synthesize titanium carbide. (2018-04-04)

Kesterite solar cells: Germanium promises better opto-electronic properties than tin
Specific changes in the composition of kesterite-type semiconductors make it possible to improve their suitability as absorber layers in solar cells. As a team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin showed, this is particularly true for kesterites in which tin was replaced by germanium. The scientists examined the samples using neutron diffraction at BER II and other methods. The work was selected for the cover of the journal CrystEngComm. (2018-03-29)

Deducing the properties of a new form of diamond
Earlier this year, amorphous diamond was synthesized for the first time using a technique involving high pressures, moderately high temperatures and a tiny amount of glassy carbon as starting material. A father-son team at Clemson University has now successfully calculated a number of basic physical properties for this new substance, including elastic constants and related quantities. The results are reported this week in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-11-30)

To e-, or not to e-, the question for the exotic 'Si-III' phase of silicon
It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number 14. The most-common form of silicon crystallizes in the same structure as diamond. New work shows that one form of silicon, Si-III, which is synthesized using a high-pressure process, is what's called a narrow band gap semiconductor. (2017-04-04)

Scientists synthesize new nanowires to improve high-speed communication
Scientists from the Institute of Process Engineering, City University of Hong Kong and their collaborators synthesized highly crystalline ternary In0.28Ga0.72Sb nanowires to demonstrate high carrier mobility and fast IR response. The new nanowire could help to improve high-speed communication. (2019-04-10)

Development of low-dimensional nanomaterials could revolutionize future technologies
Javier Vela, scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, believes improvements in computer processors, TV displays and solar cells will come from scientific advancements in the synthesis of low-dimensional nanomaterials. (2017-06-15)

Strain-free epitaxy of germanium film on mica
Germanium was the material of choice in the early history of electronic devices, and due to its high charge carrier mobility, it's making a comeback. It's generally grown on expensive single-crystal substrates, adding another challenge to making it sustainably viable for most applications. To address this aspect, researchers demonstrate an epitaxy method that incorporates van der Waals' forces to grow germanium on mica. They discuss their work in the Journal of Applied Physics. (2017-11-17)

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Computing - Electronic notebook ...Paper laboratory notebooks may go the way of the typewriter with the invention of the DOE Electronic Notebook. Manufacturing - Manufacturers of components made of plastics, polymers and metals may be able to reduce time and energy costs significantly with direct thermal systems. Electronics -- World's smartest transistor Environment -- New sensor is 'Johnny on the spot' (2000-04-11)

Materials science researchers develop first electrically injected laser
Materials science researchers have demonstrated the first electrically injected laser made with germanium tin. Used as a semiconducting material for circuits on electronic devices, the diode laser could improve micro-processing speed and efficiency at much lower costs. (2020-08-07)

Vanadium dioxyde: A revolutionary material for tomorrow's electronics
Vanadium dioxide's unique properties make it perfect for outperforming silicon and giving rise to a new generation of low-power electronic devices. Under the Phase Change Switch project, which is being funded by the EU's Horizon 2020 research program and coordinated by EPFL researchers, engineers have shown how this compound can be used to create programmable radiofrequency electronic functions for aerospace communication systems. Other applications -- such as in neuromorphic computing and artificial intelligence -- are also on the cards. (2018-02-05)

A new class of materials could realize quantum computers
Scientists at EPFL and PSI have discovered a new class of materials that can prove ideal for the implementation of spintronics. (2016-10-21)

Giving nanowires a DNA-like twist
Argonne National Laboratory played a critical role in the discovery of a DNA-like twisted crystal structure created with a germanium sulfide nanowire, also known as a 'van der Waals material.' Researchers can tailor these nanowires in many different ways -- twist periods from two to twenty micrometers, lengths up to hundreds of micrometers, and radial dimensions from several hundred nanometers to about ten micrometers. By this means, they can adjust the electrical and optical properties to optimize performance for different applications. (2019-07-10)

New 'nanotweezers' open door to innovations in medicine, mobile tech
It's difficult to conceptualize a world where humans could casually manipulate nanoscale objects at will or even control their own biological matter at a cellular level with light. But that is precisely what Yuebing Zheng, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, is working toward with his 'nanotweezers' -- a new tool for handling nanoparticles using light that could create opportunities for innovations in nanotechnology and individual health monitoring. (2018-03-27)

Spintronics: Controlling magnetic spin with electric fields
EPFL physicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies. (2018-06-19)

Nanostructures made of previously impossible material
One could think that mixing different materials is easy -- why not just melt them and pour them together? But if the goal is to create well-ordered crystals, things are more complicated. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have now found a way to add large amounts of metal to semiconductor crystals, which changes their properties dramatically. (2018-03-08)

Method improves semiconductor fiber optics, paves way for developing devices
A new method to improve semiconductor fiber optics may lead to a material structure that might one day revolutionize the global transmission of data, according to an interdisciplinary team of researchers. (2017-04-13)

Topological domain walls in helimagnets
Special domain walls with magnetic vortex structures have been discovered in helimagnets. Domain walls can have exotic magnetic properties that the regions which they separate don't reveal. For example, it's possible that the walls may interact more strongly with an electric current and could be used for data transfer and storage in the future. (2018-05-03)

Dressing a metal in various colors
DGIST research team developed a technology to coat metal with several nanometers of semiconducting materials. This technology can be applied to solar cells, wearable devices, displays, and the like. (2017-01-16)

Underground neutrino experiment sets the stage for deep discovery about matter
In a study published in Physical Review Letters, collaborators of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an experiment led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have shown they can shield a sensitive, scalable 44-kilogram germanium detector array from background radioactivity. This accomplishment is critical to developing and proposing a much larger future experiment -- with approximately a ton of detectors -- to study the nature of neutrinos. (2018-03-26)

Twisting light to enable high-capacity data transmission
For the first time, researchers have used tiny gears made of germanium to generate a vortex of twisted light that turns around its axis of travel much like a corkscrew. Because germanium is compatible with the silicon used to make computer chips, the new light source could be used to boost the amount of data that can be transmitted with chip-based optical computing and communication. (2018-12-21)

MIT researchers build first germanium laser
MIT researchers have demonstrated the first laser built from germanium that can emit wavelengths of light useful for optical communications. It's also the first germanium laser to operate at room temperature. Unlike the materials typically used in lasers, germanium is easy to incorporate into existing processes for manufacturing silicon chips. So the result could prove an important step toward computers that move data -- and maybe even perform calculations -- using light instead of electricity. (2010-02-04)

RUDN chemists synthesized a new catalyst for oil and gas processing
A team of scientists from the Research Institute of Chemistry of RUDN University together with colleagues from major scientific centers created a new catalyst -- a substance that activates oxidation processes in low-reactive components of oil and gas. The new method of hydrocarbon processing will help efficiently produce valuable organic substances such as acids and alcohols, using a reaction that requires only minor heating and no increased pressure. (2017-11-17)

Nanophysics: Serving up Buckyballs on a silver platter
New measurements conducted on C60 molecules (carbon Buckyballs) adhered to silver substrates push the limits of surface science. (2009-07-27)

Germanium outperforms silicon in energy efficient transistors with n- und p- conduction
NaMLab and cfaed reached an important breakthrough in the development of energy-efficient electronic circuits using transistors based on germanium. (2017-02-03)

Engineers design artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardware
Engineers at MIT have designed an artificial synapse in such a way that they can precisely control the strength of an electric current flowing across it, similar to the way ions flow between neurons. The team has built a small chip with artificial synapses, made from silicon germanium. In simulations, the researchers found that the chip and its synapses could be used to recognize samples of handwriting, with 95 percent accuracy. (2018-01-22)

AD alloyed nanoantennas for temperature-feedback identification of viruses and explosives
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS), ITMO University and Swinburne University of Technology (Australia) developed a method for efficient mass production of silicon-germanium fully alloyed nanoantennas. On their basis, optical biosensory platforms and next-generation chemical sensors for fast and accurate tracing of viruses, pollutions, explosives, etc. at low concentrations are expected to appear. Related paper was published in Nanoscale. (2019-04-01)

This week from AGU: New research bolsters evidence for life on Mars
This Week from AGU features recent research published in journals of the American Geophysical Union. (2017-08-23)

Closing in on elusive particles
In the quest to prove that matter can be produced without antimatter, the GERDA experiment at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory in Italy is looking for signs of neutrinoless double beta decay. The experiment has the greatest sensitivity worldwide for detecting the decay in question. To further improve the chances of success, a follow-up project, LEGEND, uses an even more refined decay experiment. (2019-09-05)

Bending an organic semiconductor can boost electrical flow
Slightly bending semiconductors made of organic materials can roughly double the speed of electricity flowing through them and could benefit next-generation electronics such as sensors and solar cells, according to Rutgers-led research. The study is published in the journal Advanced Science. (2019-12-03)

Why you should care about better fiber optics
With a new method, the gallium antimonide is initially distributed throughout the silicon. This is a simpler and cheaper method than others to grow crystals, and the technology offers many possible applications. (2019-05-23)

T-shirt generates electricity from temperature difference between body and surroundings
Researchers of the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed a low-cost T-shirt that generates electricity from the temperature difference between the human body and the surroundings. We are talking about the 'e-textile' prototype, developed in collaboration with the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa (IIT) based on sustainable methods and low-cost materials like tomato skin. (2019-11-22)

Russian scientists suggested a new technology for creating magnet micro-structures
A team of scientists from Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center (Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Sciences) and Siberian Federal University synthesized thin crystal ferromagnetic films and developed a technology for their shaping. Processed films can be used in electronic and spintronic chips. The results of the study were published in Thin Solid Films journal. (2017-12-12)

Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials
MIT engineers have developed a technique to fabricate ultrathin semiconducting films made from a host of exotic materials other than silicon. To demonstrate their technique, the researchers fabricated flexible films made from gallium arsenide, gallium nitride, and lithium fluoride -- materials that exhibit better performance than silicon but until now have been prohibitively expensive to produce in functional devices. (2018-10-08)

Taking magnetism for a spin: Exploring the mysteries of skyrmions
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered the relaxation dynamics of a zero-field state in skyrmions, a spinning magnetic phenomenon that has potential applications in data storage and spintronic devices. (2019-01-23)

Strain engineering of 2D semiconductor and graphene
Strain engineering can significantly manipulate the two-dimensional (2D) materials' electronic and optical properties, which endow it the potential applications in optoelectronics and nanophotonics. To summarize recent fascinating work about the strain engineering of 2D materials, scientists in China write a review article that gives people a comprehensive introduction to this field, including the strain field theory, tunable band structure and optical properties of 2D materials under strain field, and their photonic applications. (2020-11-23)

Newly created magnets are cheaper, more effective and 'smarter'
Ferromagnets, or more precisely, magnets -- are extremely demanded materials in modern electronics. The magnets present in almost every device -- TVs, computers, fridges, cars, smartphones, etc. But it is necessary to remember, that ferromagnetic alloys are made of rare-earth elements (REE) that is way an effective and high-powered magnet is an expensive thing. (2019-10-28)

Light-based 'tractor beam' assembles materials at the nanoscale
Researchers have adapted a light-based technology employed widely in biology -- known as optical traps or optical tweezers -- to operate in a water-free liquid environment of carbon-rich organic solvents. The optical tweezers act as a light-based 'tractor beam' that can assemble nanoscale semiconductor materials precisely into larger structures. Unlike the tractor beams of science fiction, which might grab massive spaceships, these optical tweezers can trap materials that are nearly one billion times shorter than a meter. (2019-11-04)

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