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Popular Germanium News and Current Events, Germanium News Articles.
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A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices
A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany have published in Science Advances online today an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes. (2018-11-30)

Invisible needles
An international research group of scientists from Politecnico di Torino (Italy) and NUST MISIS (Russia) has developed a model of a new metamaterial, which will improve the accuracy of nano-sensors in optics and biomedicine by cloaking them from external radiation. The article reporting the results has been recently published in Scientific Reports, a high rank, prestigious interdisciplinary journal, edited by Nature Publishing House. (2018-08-28)

Researchers develop method to non-destructively measure the salt content of concrete structures
Researchers have used a method, using the RANS compact neutron source, to non-destructively measure the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources. (2018-12-20)

Magnetic skyrmions: Not the only ones of their class
Tiny magnetic vortex structures, so-called skyrmions, have been researched intensively for some time for future energy-efficient space-saving data storage devices. Scientists at Forschungszentrum J├╝lich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. If skyrmions are used to encode the number ''1'', then the new objects could be used to encode the number ''0''. (2018-06-28)

Photonics: The curious case of the disappearing cylinders
A pair of researchers at Tokyo Tech describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating. Their findings could enable invisibility of natural materials at optical frequency and eventually lead to a simpler way of enhancing optoelectronic devices, including sensing and communication technologies. (2019-04-22)

Liquid-liquid transitions crystallize new ideas for molecular liquids
Researchers from The University of Tokyo, Institute of Industrial Science, and Tokyo Metropolitan University experimentally demonstrated that liquid-liquid transitions of a molecular liquid were coupled to crystallization behavior. The team was able to enhance the crystallization of triphenyl phosphite by applying heat treatments at temperatures relevant to the liquid phase transitions. The findings could lead to better control of crystallization in applications in science and technology, for example, in protein chemistry and nanomaterials. (2019-11-25)

New device could increase battery life of electronics by a hundred-fold
Among the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and -- in some cases -- that the devices generate heat. Now, a group of physicists led by Deepak K. Singh, associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Missouri, has developed a device material that can address both issues. The team has applied for a patent for a magnetic material that employs a unique structure -- a 'honeycomb' lattice that exhibits distinctive electronic properties. (2018-05-16)

Germanium's semiconducting and optical properties probed under pressure
Germanium may not be a household name like silicon, its group-mate on the periodic table, but it has great potential for use in next-generation electronics and energy technology. Of particular interest are forms of germanium that can be synthesized in the lab under extreme pressure conditions. However, until now one of the most-promising forms of germanium for practical applications, called ST12, has only been created in tiny sample sizes -- too small to definitively confirm its properties. (2017-01-03)

Large, good-quality, monatomic sheets of germanene grown simply using annealing
Nagoya University-led researchers have found an easier, scalable way to produce high-quality 2D sheets of germanium, possibly paving the way to industrial-scale production and the advent of the next generation of electronics. (2018-11-15)

First transport measurements reveal intriguing properties of germanene
Germanene is a 2D material that derives from germanium and is related to graphene. As it is not stable outside the vacuum chambers in which is it produced, no real measurements of its electronic properties have been made. Scientists at the University of Groningen have now managed to produce devices with stable germanene. The material is an insulator, and it becomes a semiconductor after moderate heating and a very good metallic conductor after stronger heating. (2019-02-07)

Coating approach clears up fingerprints
CSI notwithstanding, forensics experts cannot always retrieve fingerprints from objects, but a conformal coating process developed by Penn State professors can reveal hard-to-develop fingerprints on nonporous surfaces without altering the chemistry of the print. (2010-05-11)

Could the heat of the Earth's crust become the ultimate energy source?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Sanoh Industrial developed a very stable battery cell that can directly convert heat into electricity, thus finally providing a way for exploiting geothermal energy in a sustainable way. (2019-07-17)

Toward a quantum computer, one dot at a time
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a way to create semiconductor islands smaller than 10 nanometers in scale, known as quantum dots. The islands, made from germanium and placed on the surface of silicon with two-nanometer precision, are capable of confining single electrons. (2006-01-19)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

Using computational chemistry to produce cheaper infrared plastic lenses
A University of Arizona team created the next generation of long-wave infrared plastic lenses. The plastic, a sulfur-based polymer forged from waste generated by refining fossil fuels, is incredibly useful for lenses, window and other devices requiring transmission of infrared light, or IR, which makes heat visible. The new lens material could make IR cameras and sensor devices more accessible to consumers. (2019-10-29)

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication
In a new study, researchers from the University of Minnesota used an ultrathin black phosphorus film -- only 20 layers of atoms -- to demonstrate high-speed data communication on nanoscale optical circuits. (2015-03-02)

One direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting graphene nanoribbons
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison are the first to grow self-directed graphene nanoribbons on the surface of the semiconducting material germanium. This allows the semiconducting industry to tailor specific paths for nanocircuitry in their technologies. Confirmation of the findings was done at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. (2015-10-13)

Research project promises faster, cheaper and more reliable microchips
A project between academia and industry is aiming to spark a world electronics revolution by producing faster, cheaper and more reliable microchips. The University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, has joined forces with Atmel, on North Tyneside in the North East of England, to create 'strained silicon' microchips, which involves adding a material called germanium to the traditional silicon used in semiconductor manufacturing. (2003-01-20)

Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered that they could functionalize magnetic materials through a thoroughly unlikely method, by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy. (2017-06-23)

Materials Science: UD Chemist Proposes New Description Of Reactions For "Growing" Computer Chips
University of Delaware research might someday help computer companies (1997-04-14)

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications
Researchers have developed a new way to build power efficient and programmable integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip. The new technology is poised to reduce production costs by allowing a generic optical circuit to be fabricated in bulk and then later programmed for specific applications such as communications systems, LIDAR circuits or computing applications. (2020-05-28)

Semiconductor scientists discover effect that was thought impossible
Superinjection, the effect used in lasers and LEDs creation can work in 'pure' semiconductors, which was previously considered impossible. This opens up new prospects for designing highly efficient blue, violet, ultraviolet, and white LEDs, as well as light sources for optical wireless communication (Li-Fi), new types of lasers, transmitters for the quantum internet, and optical devices for early disease diagnostics. (2019-04-22)

UW-Madison team invents fast, flexible computer chips on plastic
New thin-film semiconductor techniques invented by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers promise to add sensing, computing and imaging capability to an amazing array of materials. (2006-07-18)

Slicing solar power costs
University of Utah engineers devised a new way to slice thin wafers of the chemical element germanium for use in the most efficient type of solar power cells. They say the new method should lower the cost of such cells by reducing the waste and breakage of the brittle semiconductor. (2008-09-14)

Annual production of gallium and germanium could be much higher
The global supply potential of the high-tech metals gallium and germanium is much greater than actual annual production levels. This is the main conclusion from Max Frenzel's work. Frenzel, a postgraduate student at the Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, is one of two recipients of the Bernd Rendel Prize for Geosciences 2016. The prize, awarded by the German Research Foundation, will be presented on Sept. 28 at the annual conference of the German Geological Society in Innsbruck. (2016-08-26)

Lithium-ion batteries will get more efficiency due to silicon, germanium, carbon nanowalls
Members of the D. V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics together with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University developed a new silicon- and germanium-based material that could significantly increase. The research results have been published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A. (2017-08-30)

Moriches researcher receives national award: Studies nuclear fusion and the sun: How long will it shine?
Chemist Richard L. Hahn of Moriches, N.Y., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for his work with solar neutrinos, high-speed particles from which researchers learn about the sun and nuclear fusion. He will receive the American Chemical Society Award for Nuclear Chemistry at the Society's national meeting in San Francisco. (2000-03-20)

Peppered with gold
Terahertz waves are becoming more important in science and technology. But generating these waves is still a challenge. A team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), TU Dresden and University of Konstanz has now developed a germanium component that generates short terahertz pulses with an advantageous property: the pulses have an extreme broadband spectrum and thus deliver many different terahertz frequencies at the same time. The development promises a broad range of applications in research and technology. (2020-03-16)

A first in integrated nanowire sensor circuitry
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have created the world's first all-integrated sensor circuit based on nanowire arrays, combining light sensors and electronics made of different crystalline materials. Their method can be used to reproduce numerous such devices with high uniformity. (2008-08-04)

A cavity that you want
An international research team is developing an optical 'nanocavity' that boosts the amount of light that ultrathin semiconductors absorb. The advancement could lead to: more powerful photovoltaic cells; faster video cameras; and it could be useful for splitting water using energy from light, which could aid in the development of hydrogen fuel. (2014-02-26)

An optical coating like no other
The technology, based on Fano resonance, results in a coating that fully reflects only a very narrow wavelength. The technology could improve the effectiveness of devices that use hybrid thermal-electric power generation as a solar energy option. (2021-02-04)

'Quantum Dots:' The Finish Line In High-Speed Computing?
In the full-throttle quest to make smaller, faster and better computer chips, University of Wisconsin-Madison engineer Max Lagally is exploring what may be the final frontier: Building them one atom at a time (1997-04-18)

New data adds to the hunt for dark matter in the universe
Will dark matter turn out to be Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs)? This week, an experiment deep in a mine added new and intriguing information about this theory. The scientist leading the research team -- Juan Collar, the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago -- discusses the latest findings and their implications. (2011-06-08)

Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material
Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures, reported in a new study in the journal Nature, may yield unique optical, electronic and thermal properties, including superconductivity, the researchers say. (2019-06-20)

Standard puts high-speed chips on the fast track
A new type of standard to be issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) this summer will help meet the need for speed in semiconductors. The (2003-07-28)

Twisted optics: Seeing light from a new angle
Researchers have developed a technique to generate miniature light beams that are twisted in orientation, similar in shape to a helix. (2016-07-28)

Mechanical engineering team gets $200K to study increasing capacity of lithium batteries
The National Science Foundation has awarded $200,022 to a research team led by Likun Zhu, an associate professor of mechanical engineering with the School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, to overcome problems with one approach to increasing the capacity of lithium ion batteries. (2016-06-29)

Electronics Could Take A Quantum Leap
Physicists at DOE's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Washington State University are firing positrons into quantum dots - particles 1/1,000th the diameter of a human hair - to characterize the size and electronic energy potential of the dot. Harnessing this energy by hooking several dots together could substantially enhance future electronics. (1999-03-18)

Making nanodots useful for chemistry
Nanosized clusters of germanium that can be reacted chemically to make useful materials, such as plastics, have been made by chemists at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and UC Davis. (2003-06-18)

Fine tuned: adjusting the composition and properties of semiconducting 2D alloys
Semiconducting 2D alloys could be key to overcoming the technical limitations of modern electronics. Although 2D Si-Ge alloys would have interesting properties for this purpose, they were only predicted theoretically. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have realized the first experimental demonstration. They have also shown that the Si to Ge ratio can be adjusted to fine tune the electronic properties of the alloys, paving the way for novel applications. (2021-02-02)

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