Popular Gestures News and Current Events

Popular Gestures News and Current Events, Gestures News Articles.
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Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018
The latest developmental research seeks to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience. (2018-04-19)

Decoding robotic surgery skills
Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC are looking to technology to help deconstruct expert surgeons' robotic surgery skills so they can create an objective, standardized way to train the next generation of surgeons. (2018-09-11)

Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'
Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most. (2017-11-06)

Do as i say: Translating language into movement
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly from scripts. (2019-09-10)

New 3-D technology improving patient care for complex kidney surgeries
Surgeons use unique 3-D solution to prepare for complex surgery that includes a glasses-free 3-D monitor in the operating room that allows them to navigate patient's atypical anatomy. (2017-03-09)

New technology uses mouth gestures to interact in virtual reality
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new technology that allows users to interact in a virtual reality environment using only mouth gestures. (2017-10-05)

1 in 10 suicide attempt risk among friends and relatives of people who die by suicide
People bereaved by the sudden death of a friend or family member are 65 percent more likely to attempt suicide if the deceased died by suicide than if they died by natural causes. This brings the absolute risk up to 1 in 10, reveals new UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council. (2016-01-26)

UBC engineers advance the capability of wearable tech
Creating the perfect wearable device to monitor muscle movement, heart rate and other tiny bio-signals without breaking the bank has inspired scientists to look for a simpler and more affordable tool. Now, a team of researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a practical way to monitor and interpret human motion, in what may be the missing piece of the puzzle when it comes to wearable technology. (2018-02-22)

Sexism -- it's in his smile
If you want to know what a man's true attitude towards the female sex is, carefully watch how he smiles and chats to her. This advice is gleaned from a study by Jin Goh and Judith Hall of Northeastern University in the US, published in Springer's journal Sex Roles. It sheds light on how sexism subtly influences social interaction between men and woman. (2015-03-09)

Autism might be better detected using new two-minute questionnaire
Researchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School have developed a two-minute questionnaire for parents that could help pediatricians and other primary care providers detect autism in toddlers, at a time when intervention might be crucial. The Psychological Development Questionnaire (PDQ-1) had an 88 percent likelihood of correctly identifying which of the youngster that screened positive because of the questionnaire had autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (2018-02-05)

Chimpanzee self-control is related to intelligence, Georgia State study finds
As is true in humans, chimpanzees' general intelligence is correlated to their ability to exert self-control and delay gratification, according to new research at Georgia State University. (2018-02-08)

'Social brain' networks are altered at a young age in autism
As infants develop, they respond to social cues such as voices, faces and gestures. Their brain develops a network of regions that specialise in translating these cues, the 'social brain'. A common observation in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders is reduced sensitivity towards these social cues. A team of researchers from the University of Geneva brings evidence of how this phenomenon hinders the normal development of the social brain at early developmental stages. (2018-02-27)

Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share multiple meanings
Two closely related great ape species, the bonobo and chimpanzee, use gestures that share the same meaning researchers have found. (2018-02-27)

Apes' abilities misunderstood by decades of poor science
Hundreds of scientific studies over two decades have told us that apes are clever -- just not as clever as us. New analysis argues that what we think we know about apes' social intelligence is based on wishful thinking and flawed science. (2017-08-31)

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male take over
Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover. Importantly, the gesture was produced only by adult male chimpanzees, immediately preceded their pant hoot vocalizations and was associated with acoustic changes in those calls. (2018-06-28)

A suspicious mind leads to a suspicious face
In a series of studies, social psychology researchers show that Black participants who hold suspicious views of Whites visualize White faces, even smiling ones, as less trustworthy, less authentic and sometimes more hostile. The authors suggest there are some potential advantages to these biases, as well as drawbacks. The results are published in Social Psychological and Personality Science. (2017-05-09)

Want your question answered quickly? Use gestures as well as words
When someone asks a question during a conversation, their conversation partner answers more quickly if the questioner also moves their hands or head to accompany their words. These are the findings of a study led by Judith Holler of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands. The study is published in Springer's journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review and focuses on how gestures influence language processing. (2017-09-07)

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems
Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems. (2018-06-06)

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures
System enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems. (2018-06-20)

Scholars: In #MeToo movement, lessons of restorative and transitional justice important
A new paper from a team of University of Illinois legal scholars argues that reformers of the burgeoning #MeToo movement ought to heed the core principles of restorative and transitional justice and take into account the needs of both victims and offenders, as well as the larger community. (2018-04-13)

Paint job transforms walls into sensors, interactive surfaces
Walls are what they are -- big, dull dividers. With a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, however, walls can become smart infrastructure that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are used. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost using simple tools and techniques, such as a paint roller. (2018-04-23)

How does language emerge?
How did the almost 6000 languages of the world come into being? Researchers from the Leipzig Research Centre for Early Childhood Development at Leipzig University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have tried to simulate the process of developing a new communication system in an experiment - with surprising results: even preschool children can spontaneously develop communication systems that exhibit core properties of natural language. (2019-12-03)

Wearable ring, wristband allow users to control smart tech with hand gestures
New technology created by a team of Georgia Tech researchers could make controlling text or other mobile applications as simple as '1-2-3.' Using acoustic chirps emitted from a ring and received by a wristband, like a smartwatch, the system is able to recognize 22 different micro finger gestures that could be programmed to various commands -- including a T9 keyboard interface, a set of numbers, or application commands like playing or stopping music. (2018-05-14)

Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share many meanings
If a bonobo and a chimpanzee were to meet face to face, they could probably understand each other's gestures. In an article publishing 27 February in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers from the Universities of St Andrews, York, and Kyoto have found that many of the gestures used by bonobos and chimpanzees share the same meanings. (2018-02-27)

Good Manners Put The Brakes On "Road Rage"
A major cause of anger while driving is the inconsiderate and discourteous behaviour of other road users - not blatant law- breaking. If drivers adopted better road manners much of Britain's reported 'road rage' could be eradicated. (1998-06-10)

The art of storytelling: researchers explore why we relate to characters
For thousands of years, humans have relied on storytelling to engage, to share emotions and to relate personal experiences. Now, psychologists at McMaster University are exploring the mechanisms deep within the brain to better understand just what happens when we communicate. (2018-09-13)

The UC3M programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have published a paper featuring the results of research into interactions between robots and deaf people, in which they were able to programme a humanoid - called TEO - to communicate in sign language. (2019-07-08)

Dartmouth to debut wearables that warn and wow at UIST 2017
A smart watch that takes the user to another dimension and a smart ring that provides powerful feedback are among the top technology Dartmouth College will bring to the 30th ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2017). (2017-10-20)

Babies need free tongue movement to decipher speech sounds
Inhibiting infants' tongue movements impedes their ability to distinguish between speech sounds, researchers with the University of British Columbia have found. The study is the first to discover a direct link between infants' oral-motor movements and auditory speech perception. (2015-10-12)

Study highlights importance of multimodal communication in higher ed
Research finds that 'multimodal' communication -- using a mix of words, images and other resources - is important for students and faculty in higher education, a finding that argues for increased instruction in multimodal communication for undergraduates. (2016-03-28)

Even small gifts boost business
If a sales agent brings their customer a small gift, the customer is much more likely to make a purchase, a study by the university of Zurich has shown. This works particularly well when the person receiving the gift is the boss. The fact that even small gifts can result in conflicts of interest has implications for the debate about where the line should be drawn between tokens of appreciation and attempted bribery. (2018-10-04)

Sounds can help develop speech and gestures in children with autism
Children with autism and other similar conditions often have difficulties in several areas of communication. A new doctoral thesis in linguistics from the University of Gothenburg shows that these children can develop speech, gestures and a sense of rhythm and melody by listening to various speech sounds. (2016-02-24)

Telling stories using rhythmic gesture helps children improve their oral skills
For the first time it has been shown that a brief training session with rhythmic gestures has immediate benefits for narrative discourse in children of 5 and 6 years of age in a study published recently in Developmental Psychology led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor and coordinator of the Prosodic Studies Group and of the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, together with her collaborators, Ingrid Vilà-Giménez and Alfonso Igualada (Cognition and Language Research Group, Open University of Catalonia). (2019-01-17)

Study finds field of forensic anthropology lacks diversity
The field of forensic anthropology is a relatively homogenous discipline in terms of diversity (people of color, LGBTQ+ individuals, people with mental and physical disabilities, etc.) and this is highly problematic for the field of study and for most forensic anthropologists. (2020-10-23)

Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life
Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively. (2018-11-30)

Energy harvesting and innovative inputs highlight tech show gadgetry
A battery-free energy harvester, a novel conductive system for smartwatches, and a prototype that extends body language to the human ear feature at new tech conference. (2018-10-15)

Study on joint attention has implications for understanding autism
A hallmark of human nature is the ability to share information and to comprehend the thoughts and intentions of others. Scientists refer to this skill as (2007-09-26)

Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions 
Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. A new study from Lund University, published in the journal Primates, has instead targeted the interactive side of imitation directly, and finds that the divide between humans and chimpanzees is less clear cut. (2017-08-21)

Concussion: How the NFL came to shape the issue that plagued it
Players kneeling during the national anthem is the most recent NFL controversy, but certainly not the first nor the biggest. (2017-10-10)

Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'
Cornell University researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express 'emotions' through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings. (2018-07-16)

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