Popular Gestures News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Gestures News and Current Events, Gestures News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 10 | 369 Results
Words and actions
Words and gestures are -- partially -- connected inside the brain. It is the result of a study carried out also by, among others, the International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste, which sheds light on a debate that has been engaging the scientific community for many years: is cognition (2013-07-31)

Patients and caregivers value caring, continuity, and accountability in care transitions
In the transition from hospital to home, patients and caregivers seek clear accountability, continuity, and caring attitudes across the care continuum. One-hundred and thirty-eight patients and 110 family caregivers participating in focus groups and interviews identified three desired outcomes of care transition services: feeling prepared and able to implement care plans, unambiguous accountability from the healthcare system, and feeling cared for and cared about by clinicians. (2018-05-14)

Soft, social robot brings coziness to homes -- and classrooms
A new social robot that can be customized with handcrafted material, such as wood and wool, brings simplicity and fun to home robotics -- and will soon be used to help teach math to fourth graders. (2019-05-22)

Indigenous children don't need number words to 'count', says new study
Indigenous Australian children who speak languages that have few number words are still able to count, according to a new international study. (2008-08-18)

Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows
The verbal and physical signs of lying are harder to detect than people believe, a study suggests. (2018-10-12)

Gestures improve communication -- even with robots
In the world of robot communication, it seems actions speak louder than words. Scientists in the UK have discovered that by getting robot avatars to 'talk with their hands,' we understand them as well as we do our fellow human beings. (2016-04-04)

Dyslexia: When spelling problems impair writing acquisition
Several studies have sought to identify the source of the problems encountered by individuals with dyslexia when they read. Little attention has been paid to the mechanisms involved in writing. Researchers decided to look at the purely motor aspects of writing in children diagnosed with dyslexia. Their results show that orthographic processing in children with dyslexia is so laborious that it can modify or impair writing skills, despite the absence of dysgraphia in these children. (2017-11-28)

Seeing isn't required to gesture like a native speaker
People the world over gesture when they talk, and they tend to gesture in certain ways depending on the language they speak. Findings from a new study including blind and sighted participants suggest that these gestural variations do not emerge from watching other speakers make the gestures, but from learning the language itself. (2016-03-21)

Despite negative consequences, benevolent sexism helps in search for mate
Some women may like it when a man opens the door on a first date or offers to pay the bill at dinner, while others may find the gestures insulting. New research provides an alternative explanation as to why some women respond positively. (2018-07-25)

Talking on your cell phone while driving may be hazardous to your close relationships
Warnings about the dangers of distracted driving while using a cell phone are prevalent these days, but cell phone use while driving may also put family relationships in jeopardy, says University of Minnesota professor Paul Rosenblatt. (2010-06-15)

Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development
New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs. (2019-01-31)

A little kindness goes a long way for worker performance and health
Small gestures of kindness by employers can have big impacts on employees' health and work performance, according to an international team of researchers. The team specifically examined the effects of employers enhancing the lunches of bus drivers in China with fresh fruit and found that it reduced depression among the drivers and increased their confidence in their own work performance. (2019-09-10)

How parents, siblings can become teachers for special needs children
Parents and siblings of children with limited speech who took an innovative training program created by a Michigan State University scholar significantly improved their ability to communicate with the special needs youth. (2017-08-29)

Scientists unlock secret of how the brain encodes speech
People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain controls speech in a similar way to how it controls arm movements. (2018-09-26)

Deaf sign language users pick up faster on body language
Deaf people who use sign language are quicker at recognizing and interpreting body language than hearing non-signers, according to new research from investigators at UC Davis and UC Irvine. (2012-01-12)

Patients prefer doctors not use computers in exam room
A new study suggests that people with advanced cancer prefer doctors communicate with them face-to-face with just a notepad in hand rather than repeatedly using a computer. (2017-10-23)

Dual-function nanorod LEDs could make multifunctional displays
Cellphones and other devices could soon be controlled with touchless gestures and charge themselves using ambient light, thanks to new LED arrays that can both emit and detect light. (2017-02-09)

How do children express their state of knowledge of the world around them?
A study published in Journal of Language, Learning and Development by researchers with the Prosodic Studies Group led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor with the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, reveals for the first time that three-year-olds use gestural and prosodic precursors in the expression of uncertainty, which they will express after five years of age through lexical cues. (2019-10-09)

Brain imaging reveals neural correlates of human social behavior
Advances in the study of human social behavior may lead to a better understanding of normal processes such as empathy and theory of mind, as well as dysregulated conditions including autism spectrum disorder. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2019-10-22)

Why scientists should research emojis and emoticons :-P
More than 90 percent of online populations now incorporate emojis and emoticons into their texts and emails, and researchers are wondering what the use of (~_^), (>_<), or =D can reveal about human behavior. In a forum paper published on Jan. 17 in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, psychologists Linda Kaye, Stephanie Malone, and Helen Wall discuss emojis and emoticons as tools for evaluating how we relate to each other in the digital age. (2017-01-17)

£1.75 million five-year project under way to uncover new 'sound worlds'
A £1.7 million, five-year research project at the University of Huddersfield will push the limits of new 'sound worlds' for composers, performers and producers of electronic music. They will be able to use newly-developed, freely-distributed software tools and methodologies to mine vast digital sound databases for the exact sonorities they need, and will also be aided in the creation of exciting new sounds and ideas. (2017-02-07)

Is UK shale gas extraction posing a risk to public health?
More needs to be done to investigate the risks to human health that extracting shale gas poses, suggests a personal view published on bmj.com today. (2014-04-17)

One firm's loss is another's gain
Good news for savvy businesses: customers who walk through your doors unhappy with another firm's service can be won back with simple gestures of goodwill. (2014-11-17)

New tool streamlines the creation of moving pictures
It's often easy to imagine balloons soaring or butterflies fluttering across a still image, but realizing this vision through computer animation is easier said than done. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new tool that makes animating such images much simpler. (2018-10-24)

Gesturing related to storytelling style, not nationality, study
New research by University of Alberta scientists suggests that the amount you gesture when telling a story has more to do with what you're saying than where you're from. (2019-03-26)

Can watching movies detect autism?
In the current study, the researchers presented ASD and control children with three short movies, each shown twice. Two of the movies were animated and one was a realistic home video; all contained social interactions between at least two individuals. This experimental design allowed comparisons across movies, presentations and different eye tracking measures to identify what is the best technique for identifying ASD children based on differences in gaze behavior. (2019-10-28)

In brain-injured children, early gesturing predicts language delays
A new study has found that gesturing at 18 months (but not early speech) predicted which children with pre- or perinatal brain lesions had vocabulary delays a year later. The results suggest that gesture may be a tool for diagnosing persistent language delay in such children. This research is important because about 1 in 4,000 infants has this type of brain injury, and intervention early in development may be critical to successful remediation of language delay. (2010-03-25)

Future surgeons may use robotic nurse, 'gesture recognition'
Surgeons of the future might use a system that recognizes hand gestures as commands to control a robotic scrub nurse or tell a computer to display medical images of the patient during an operation. (2011-02-03)

Carnegie Mellon system lets iPad users explore data with their fingers
Spreadsheets may have been the original killer app for personal computers, but data tables don't play to the strengths of multi-touch devices such as tablets. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a visualization approach that allows people to explore complex data with their fingers. Called Kinetica, the proof-of-concept system for the Apple iPad converts tabular data, such as Excel spreadsheets, into colored spheres that respond to touch. (2014-04-22)

Study finds chimps can use gestures to communicate in hunt for food
Chimpanzees are capable of using gestures to communicate as they pursue specific goals, such as finding a hidden piece of food, according to a new Georgia State University research study. (2014-01-17)

Humans' ability to read dogs' facial expressions is learned, not innate
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Germany and the United Kingdom assessed how experience with dogs affects humans' ability to recognize dog emotions. Participants who grew up in a cultural context with a dog-friendly attitude were more proficient at recognizing dog emotions. This suggests that the ability to recognize dogs' expressions is learned through age and experience and is not an evolutionary adaptation. (2019-11-11)

Language may play important role in learning the meanings of numbers
New research conducted with deaf people in Nicaragua shows that language may play an important role in learning the meanings of numbers. (2011-02-08)

Gestures lend a hand in learning mathematics
Gesturing helps students develop new ways of understanding mathematics. Scholars have known for a long time that movements help retrieve information about an event or physical activity associated with action. A report published in the current issue of the journal Psychological Science, however, is the first to show that gestures not only help recover old ideas, they also help create new ones. The information could be helpful to teachers. (2009-02-24)

Children with brain lesions able to use gestures important to language learning
Children with brain lesions suffered before or around the time of birth are able to use gestures -- an important aspect of the language learning process -- to convey simple sentences. (2013-02-20)

Football coaches between victories, defeats and emotions
Football coaches who have their emotions under control are more successful. This has now been reported in the Sports journal by scientists from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. Because emotions and how they are dealt with have a great impact on the performance of coaches and therefore also the team as a whole. (2018-11-13)

Smartphone security: Why doodling trumps text passwords
Someday soon, you may be able to log into your smartphone with sweeping gestures or doodling, using one or more fingers. Rutgers University researchers have performed the first study of free-form gesture passwords for smartphones in the field. Such passwords allow people to draw a password of any shape with any number of fingers. Gesture, or doodling, passwords are very suitable for touchscreens, faster to use, easy to remember and hard to guess. (2016-03-10)

Technology puts 'touch' into long-distance relationships
Long-distance couples can share a walk, watch movies together, and even give each other a massage, using new technologies being developed in Carman Neustaedter's Simon Fraser University lab. (2017-02-14)

Great apes communicate cooperatively
Gestural communication in bonobos and chimpanzees shows turn-taking and clearly distinguishable communication styles. (2016-05-24)

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control
University of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users 'train' their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone. (2014-09-19)

Do bigger brains equal smarter dogs? New study offers answers
Larger dogs have better short-term memory and self-control than smaller breeds, according to research led by the Arizona Canine Cognition Center at the University of Arizona. (2019-01-28)

Page 2 of 10 | 369 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.