Popular Gestures News and Current Events | Page 3

Popular Gestures News and Current Events, Gestures News Articles.
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Technology puts 'touch' into long-distance relationships
Long-distance couples can share a walk, watch movies together, and even give each other a massage, using new technologies being developed in Carman Neustaedter's Simon Fraser University lab. (2017-02-14)

Football coaches between victories, defeats and emotions
Football coaches who have their emotions under control are more successful. This has now been reported in the Sports journal by scientists from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. Because emotions and how they are dealt with have a great impact on the performance of coaches and therefore also the team as a whole. (2018-11-13)

Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning
Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content 'on the fly' -- even if it is not linguistic in nature. (2019-04-25)

Study: Social robots can benefit hospitalized children
A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that 'social robots' used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children. (2019-06-26)

Do bigger brains equal smarter dogs? New study offers answers
Larger dogs have better short-term memory and self-control than smaller breeds, according to research led by the Arizona Canine Cognition Center at the University of Arizona. (2019-01-28)

Popular mobile games can be used to detect signs of cognitive decline
New research shows that popular mobile phone games such as Tetris, Candy Crush Saga and Fruit Ninja could provide a new tool to help doctors spot early signs of cognitive decline, some of which may indicate the onset of serious conditions like dementia. (2019-09-12)

Interactive avatar boosts performance of children with ADHD
A new study has shown that an interactive avatar, which gives both instructions and feedback on the attention of the learner, can improve the performance of ADHD children on a complex problem-solving task. (2019-09-26)

Recreating Dick Tracy's wrist radio with the expected arrival of Apple Watch
With the much anticipated arrival of the Apple Watch in April, this article looks into the haptic and telexistence technologies behind the latest iDevice's bells and whistles. (2015-01-30)

Pointing is infants' first communicative gesture
Catalan researchers have studied the acquisition and development of language in babies on the basis of the temporary coordination of gestures and speech. The results are the first in showing how and when they acquire the pattern of coordination between the two elements which allows them to communicate very early. (2014-02-24)

Artificial skin creates first ticklish devices
A new interface developed by researchers in Bristol and Paris takes touch technology to the next level by providing an artificial skin-like membrane for augmenting interactive devices such as phones, wearables or computers. (2019-10-19)

Economists find mixed values of 'thoughts and prayers'
Christians who suffer from natural and human-caused disasters value thoughts and prayers from religious strangers, while atheists and agnostics believe they are worse off from such gestures. (2019-09-16)

Great apes communicate cooperatively
Gestural communication in bonobos and chimpanzees shows turn-taking and clearly distinguishable communication styles. (2016-05-24)

KAIST's smart e-book system more convenient than paper-based books
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology announced that its research team headed by professor Howon Lee from the IT Convergence Research Institute has developed a technology that will make reading on smartphones and tablet PCs easier than now. (2012-01-10)

Customers less tolerant of employee rudeness than incompetence
Rude behavior among employees can negatively affect consumer perceptions -- even when the incivility isn't directed at the customer. (2010-07-22)

Depicting as a method of communication
When we think of language, we usually think of words, phrases, and sentences -- strings of abstract symbols. In research over the past 50 years, cognitive and social scientists have developed extensive accounts of how people communicate with these symbols. But when people are face to face, they also communicate with actions that depict people, objects, and events. They create these depictions with their hands, arms, head, face, voice, and entire body, sometimes with other props but often without. (2016-03-03)

How vision captures sound now somewhat uncertain
Contrary to previous research, Duke University researchers have found that neurons in a particular brain region respond differently, not similarly, based on whether the stimuli is visual or auditory. The finding, which posted Jan. 15 in the journal PLOS ONE, provides insight into how vision captures the location of perceived sound. (2014-01-16)

Future smartwatches could sense hand movement using ultrasound imaging
New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. (2017-10-11)

Defending the science of infant imitation
In a counter-response recently published in the journal Developmental Science, Elizabeth Simpson and her co-authors argue that the Current Biology study failed to use appropriate methods, and is highly flawed. She argues that there is overwhelming evidence that infant imitation is real. (2017-11-28)

New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues
Pet dogs are highly receptive to commands from their owners. But is this due to their training or do dogs have an innate ability to understand human signals? A new study finds that 80% of untrained stray dogs successfully followed pointing directions from people to a specific location. The results suggest that dogs can understand and respond to complex gestures without any training, meaning that dogs may have an innate connection to human behaviors. (2020-01-17)

New software for Google Glass provides captions for hard-of-hearing users
A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created speech-to-text software for Google Glass that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly into a smartphone. The speech is converted to text, sent to Glass and displayed on its heads-up display. (2014-10-02)

Surgeons may use hand gestures to manipulate MRI images in OR
Doctors may soon be using a system in the operating room that recognizes hand gestures as commands to tell a computer to browse and display medical images of the patient during a surgery. (2013-01-10)

New techniques allow greater control of smartwatches
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have invented new ways to interact that provide a little more control, including taps of the skin, nudges on the side of the watch and breathing on the screen. (2017-01-27)

Robot uses social feedback to fetch objects intelligently
By enabling them to ask a question when they're confused, an algorithm developed at Brown University helps robots get better at fetching objects, an important task for future robot assistants. (2017-03-06)

Artificial intelligence enables recognizing and assessing a violinist's bow movements
In playing music, gestures are extremely important, in part because they are directly related to the sound and the expressiveness of the musicians. Today, technology exists that captures movement and is capable of detecting gestural details very precisely. (2019-04-02)

Rats give more generously in response to the smell of hunger
How do animals that help their brethren manage to prioritize those most in need? A study publishing March 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Karin Schneeberger and colleagues of the universities of Bern in Switzerland and Potsdam in Germany, shows that rats can use odor cues alone to determine how urgently to provide food assistance to other rats in need. (2020-03-24)

The number of illustrations in storybooks influences children's word learning
New research shows that the number of illustrations presented in a storybook can influence preschool children's ability to learn words from shared reading. (2017-07-12)

Talking to an android
Researchers have significantly upgraded the interaction system for the conversational android ERICA, by implementing 'backchanneling' and 'attentive listening' ability. (2018-08-20)

Repurposed sensor enables smartwatch to detect finger taps and other bio-acoustic signals
A smartwatch is capable of detecting and distinguishing a variety of taps, flicks and scratches by the hands and fingers, and all that's required is a software upgrade that repurposes the device's existing accelerometer, Carnegie Mellon University researchers discovered. This new functionality makes possible new applications that use common gestures to control the smartwatch. (2016-10-17)

Wearable robot transforms musicians into 3-armed drummers
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have built a wearable robotic limb that allows drummers to play with three arms. The two-foot long 'smart arm' can be attached to a musician's shoulder and responds to human gestures and the music it hears. When the drummer moves to play the high hat cymbal, for example, the robotic arm maneuvers to play the ride cymbal. (2016-02-17)

UD researchers develop revolutionary computer interface technology
University of Delaware researchers have developed a revolutionary computer interface technology that promises to put the bite on the traditional mouse and mechanical keyboard. (2002-10-08)

That new baby isn't imitating you
For decades, there have been studies suggesting that human babies are capable of imitating facial gestures, hand gestures, facial expressions, or vocal sounds right from their first weeks of life after birth. But, based on new evidence, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 5, 2016 now say that just isn't so. (2016-05-05)

Owner behavior affects effort and accuracy in dogs' communications
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and Friedrich Schiller University in Jena have found that dogs adapt their communicative strategies to their environment and that owner behavior influences communicative effort and success. Experimental results found no evidence that dogs rely on communication history or follow the principle of least effort and suggest that owner behavior has a bigger impact on canine communication than previously thought. (2020-07-06)

War on plastic is distracting from more urgent threats to environment, experts warn
A team of leading environmental experts, spearheaded by the University of Nottingham, have warned that the current war on plastic is detracting from the bigger threats to the environment. (2020-10-23)

Going through the motions improves dance performance
Dance marking -- loosely practicing a ballet routine by (2013-07-23)

Pain hurts more if the person hurting you means it
Psychologists at Harvard University have found that pain hurts more when we think that someone intended to cause hurt. Intentional pain also seems to have a fresh sting every time, whereas we get used to unintentional pain. (2008-12-15)

New device enables battery-free computer input at the tip of your finger
Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have created a device for wearable computer input suitable for many situations, just by touching your fingertips together in different ways. The device, called Tip-Tap, is inexpensive and battery-free through the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags to sense when fingertips touch. The device could, therefore, be added to disposable surgical gloves, allowing surgeons to access preoperative planning diagrams in an operating room. (2019-11-28)

Oink, oink makes the pig
In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. They thus provide important fundamental findings for the development of modern teaching methods. (2020-05-13)

Growing up in a bilingual home has lasting benefits
New research has found that growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates for the first time that adults who acquired their second language as a young child (early bilinguals) are quicker at shifting attention and quicker at detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). (2021-01-22)

Getting a grip on robotic grasp
Researchers at MIT have developed a robot that enhances the grasping motion of the human hand. (2014-07-18)

Revolutionary flexible smartphone allows users to feel the buzz by bending their apps
Researchers at Queen's University's Human Media Lab have developed the world's first full-color, high-resolution and wireless flexible smartphone to combine multitouch with bend input. (2016-02-16)

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