Popular Gps News and Current Events

Popular Gps News and Current Events, Gps News Articles.
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Dyslexia does not reduce pass rates for UK GP licensing exam
A study led by academics at the University of Lincoln has found that UK GPs who declare dyslexia prior to taking the AKT are just as likely to pass the knowledge component of the licensing exam as their counterparts. Candidates who declared dyslexia after initially failing the exam were more likely to be minority ethnic candidates with a primary medical qualification outside of the UK. (2018-02-12)

Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of the link between obesity and cancer. (2017-11-17)

Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs
The emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2018-01-11)

New research on why GPs quit patient care
The research aimed to identify factors influencing GPs' decisions about whether or not to remain in direct patient care, and what might help to retain them in the role. Three reasons emerged: a sense that general practice based primary care was under-valued within the healthcare system; concerns regarding professional risk encountered in delivering care in an increasingly complex health environment; and finally, considerations about leaving or remaining in direct patient care and the options and choices that GPs felt were available to them. (2018-02-02)

NASA CubeSat to test miniaturized weather satellite technology
The NASA-funded CubeSat, called Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA), will be launched into Earth's orbit from the rocket carrying the next big US weather satellite (NOAA's JPSS-1) into space. MiRaTA is designed to demonstrate that a small satellite can carry instrument technology that's capable of reducing the cost and size of future weather satellites and has the potential to routinely collect reliable weather data. (2017-11-09)

Hunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areas
In a new study, researchers found that while big cats like mountain lions are generally fearful of and avoid humans, hunger can dampen that fear. (2018-03-13)

Four simple tests could help GPs spot pneumonia and reduce unnecessary antibiotics
Testing for fever, high pulse rate, crackly breath sounds, and low oxygen levels could be key to helping GPs distinguish pneumonia from less serious infections, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2017-11-22)

Cuts to mental health services putting young people at risk, say experts
Funding cuts and austerity measures are damaging young people's access to mental health services, with potentially long-term consequences for their mental wellbeing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2017-09-15)

Spotlight on quantum computing at SXSW 2018
South by Southwest 2018 hosts a panel on March 10th called Quantum Computing: Science Fiction to Science Fact. Experts on quantum computing make up the panel, including Antia Lamas-Linares of the Texas Advanced Computing Center at UT Austin. Lamas-Linares co-authored a study in the Proceedings of the SPIE (February, 2018). The study, 'Secure Quantum Clock Synchronization,' proposed a protocol to verify and secure time synchronization of distant atomic clocks, such as those used for GPS signals in cell phone towers. (2018-03-09)

Map of ionospheric disturbances to help improve radio network systems
The paper, titled (2018-01-12)

New maps document big-game migrations across the western United States
For the first time, state and federal wildlife biologists have come together to map the migrations of ungulates across America's West. The maps will help land managers and conservationists pinpoint actions necessary to keep migration routes open and functional to sustain healthy big-game populations. (2020-11-12)

Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2018-01-17)

New UTSA study presents method to stop cyber attacks on GPS-enabled devices
A new study by researchers Nikolaos Gatsis, David Akopian and Ahmad F. Taha from the UTSA Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering describes a computer algorithm that mitigates the effects of spoofed GPS attacks on electrical grids and other GPS-reliant technologies. This new algorithm has the potential to help cybersecurity professionals to better detect and prevent cyber attacks in real time. (2018-03-19)

In California, large-scale water cycles impact quakes a little
In California, seasonal changes in large-scale water cycles modestly influence small-scale quake activity, a new study reports. (2017-06-15)

Newly discovered active fault building new Dalmatian Islands off Croatian coast
A newly identified fault that runs under the Adriatic Sea is actively building more of the famously beautiful Dalmatian Islands and Dinaride Mountains of Croatia, according to a new research report. Geologists had previously believed that the Dalmatian Islands and the Dinaride Mountains had stopped growing 20 to 30 million years ago. The Croatian coast is an increasing popular tourist destination. Dubrovnik, known as (2008-01-22)

Wider coverage of satellite data better detects magma supply to volcanoes
Using satellite imaging, Penn State researchers for the first time identified a major magma supply into a reservoir extending almost two miles from the crater of a volcano in Nicaragua. (2018-03-28)

How does the brain's spatial map change when we change the shape of the room?
A new study, published today in Science, explores the consequences of distorting the shape of the enclosing box on cognitive maps of space. The results detail how our cognitive maps adapt to changed environments and shed light on how distinct types of neurons may connect to form these maps. (2018-03-08)

Brexit and policy restrictions on immigration could worsen GP workforce crisis
Difficulties in replacing a fifth of the general practice workforce in England after Brexit will primarily threaten healthcare in more deprived areas, according to a study published in the open-access journal BMC Medicine. Twenty-one percent of general practitioners employed in English primary care are doctors who qualified outside the UK (4.1 percent in the EEA and 17 percent elsewhere). (2017-11-15)

Experiment aboard space station studies 'space weather'
To study conditions in the ionosphere, Cornell University research engineer Steven Powell and others in the College of Engineering have developed the FOTON (Fast Orbital TEC for Orbit and Navigation) GPS receiver. This year, the FOTON hitched a ride aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket to begin a long-term project at the International Space Station. (2017-03-13)

Falsifying Galileo satellite signals will become more difficult
The European Union activated its Galileo satellite navigation system in December 2016. The EU is dedicated to setting this system apart from other navigation systems such as GPS - the US counterpart of Galileo. Researchers from the Department of Electrical Engineering at KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) have now risen to this challenge as well: they designed authentication features that will make it even more difficult to send out false Galileo signals. (2017-02-10)

Patients with multiple conditions receive higher level of care in affluent areas
Patients with multimorbidity -- two or more long-term medical conditions -- have complex health care needs, often requiring higher levels of care than other patients. According to a new study, however, patients with multimorbidity in affluent areas receive longer doctor visits, greater perceived empathy, and more patient-centered care than comparable patients in socioeconomically deprived areas. (2018-03-13)

Where humans set up camp, animals roam much shorter distances
In areas with high levels of human activity, mammal movements can be reduced by as much as three-fold, a new study reports. (2018-01-25)

Better understanding post-earthquake fault movement
Preparation and good timing enabled Gareth Funning and a team of researchers to collect a unique data set following the 2014 South Napa earthquake that showed different parts of the fault, sometimes only a few kilometers apart, moved at different speeds and at different times. (2016-07-18)

Cancer patients receive less support to quit smoking than patients with heart disease
This research appears in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)

Family doctors could better detect child neglect with increased dental health training
New research now suggests that GPs lack the awareness and training to identify dental neglect in children, and therefore could miss the opportunity to share potential cases of wider abuse or neglect to other health and welfare professionals. The study in The British Dental Journal was led by Sascha Colgan, consultant GP and visiting researcher at the University of Southampton in the UK, and was published by Springer Nature. (2018-05-10)

AGU: Better, faster tsunami warnings possible with GPS
Better, faster tsunami warnings are possible with GPS. (2016-02-16)

Shrimp-inspired camera may enable underwater navigation
The underwater environment may appear to the human eye as a dull-blue, featureless space. However, a vast landscape of polarization patterns appear when viewed through a camera that is designed to see the world through the eyes of many of the animals that inhabit the water. (2018-04-04)

Weather satellites aid search and rescue capabilities
The same satellites that identify severe weather can help save you from it. NOAA's GOES series satellites carry a payload supported by NASA's Search and Rescue (SAR) office, which researches and develops technologies to help first responders locate people in distress worldwide, whether from a plane crash, a boating accident or other emergencies. (2018-03-07)

'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas
As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans -- getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks. (2019-06-04)

Depression among parents of newborns can persist 6 months after NICU discharge
Young parents who have less education and care for more than one child are more likely to have persistent symptoms of depression that linger six months after their newborn is discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit, according to a Children's National Health System research presentation during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2018 annual meeting. (2018-05-05)

Translating elephant seal data into a symphony provides surprising insights
Sonification of 10 years of oceanic migration of these seals reveals coordinated swimming. (2018-04-23)

NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission locates elusive electron act
New NASA research helps improve our understanding of how electrons move through the complex region around Earth -- information that will help untangle how such particle acrobatics affect the planet. (2018-01-03)

New gadgets help reveal the collective behavior of wild animals
An international team of scientists led by Swansea University biologists describe how novel technologies are transforming our understanding of why wild animals form different groups. (2018-04-11)

Teaching drones about the birds and the bees
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) of the future will be able to visually coordinate their flight and navigation just like birds and flying insects do, without needing human input, radar or even GPS satellite navigation. (2016-07-04)

Aquaplaning in the geological underground
Scientists propose a mechanism that explains how the biggest earthquake ever happened and how more than 50 years later another large earthquake in the same region released some of the stress that had built up in the depth. Water pressure in the underground plays a crucial role in both cases. (2018-04-02)

Humans limit animal movements
Humans change entire landscapes -- by building cities and roads, by farming land and by exploiting natural resources. What effects does this have on animals and their habitats? Using the GPS location data of more than 800 animals, a team of scientists was able to prove a reduction in animal movements in areas with a high human footprint. (2018-01-25)

NASA's solar dynamics observatory captured trio of solar flares April 2-3
The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of the three events. (2017-04-03)

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantle
An international team of researchers, with a new study published in Science with DTU Space as lead author, finds that the bedrock below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than expected, revealing a very different Earth structure than previously believed. This discovery has important implications in understanding the present and future climate changes in Antarctica. (2018-06-21)

Sun erupts with significant flare
The sun emitted a significant, X8.2-class solar flare, peaking at 12:06 p.m. EDT on Sept. 10, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. (2017-09-11)

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