Popular Guess News and Current Events

Popular Guess News and Current Events, Guess News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 8 | 302 Results
Video game system technology helping physical therapists, athletic trainers
Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians and athletic trainers analyze how we move -- it also is very expensive. Some motion labs can cost upward of $100,000. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers is finding that the depth camera often associated with video game systems can provide a variety of health care providers with objective information to improve patient care. (2017-12-07)

'Workhorse' lithium battery could be more powerful thanks to new design
Cornell University chemical engineering professor Lynden Archer believes there needs to be a battery technology 'revolution' -- and thinks that his lab has fired one of the first shots. (2018-06-25)

Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we see
Most people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt, vision is a little more complicated than that. She has a new paper that faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game familiar to children of the 80s: Pong. (2018-01-03)

Antibiotics can boost bacterial reproduction
The growth of bacteria can be stimulated by antibiotics, scientists at the University of Exeter have discovered. (2017-01-30)

Uncertainty can cause more stress than inevitable pain
Knowing that there is a small chance of getting a painful electric shock can lead to significantly more stress than knowing that you will definitely be shocked. A new study found that situations in which subjects had a 50 percent chance of receiving a shock were the most stressful while 0 percent and 100 percent chances were the least stressful. People whose stress levels tracked uncertainty more closely were better at guessing whether or not they would receive a shock, suggesting that stress may inform judgments of risk. (2016-03-29)

'Bee' informed: Public interest exceeds understanding in bee conservation
Many people have heard bee populations are declining due to such threats as colony collapse disorder, pesticides and habitat loss. And many understand bees are critical to plant pollination. Yet, according to a study led by Utah State University ecologist Joseph Wilson, few are aware of the wide diversity of bees and other pollinators beyond such species as honeybees. Because conservation efforts require substantial public support, outreach is needed to help people understand bee declines and how to protect pollinators. (2017-09-05)

More dentists to discuss risks of HPV-related cancers with their patients
The dental community is working to strengthen HPV prevention efforts, helping reduce the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancers. (2018-01-10)

Insilico Medicine launches a deep learned biomarker of aging, Aging.AI 2.0 for testing
Insilico Medicine, Inc., a company applying latest advances in deep learning to biomarker development, drug discovery and aging research, launched Aging.AI 2.0. Comparing Aging.AI 1.0 using 41 blood biochemistry biomarkers, Aging.AI 2.0 uses just 33 parameters from the blood test and has slightly higher mean absolute error. (2016-11-14)

Seeing the quantum future... literally
Sydney scientists have demonstrated the ability to 'see' the future of quantum systems and used that knowledge to preempt their demise, in a major achievement that could help bring the strange and powerful world of quantum technology closer to reality. Although applications of quantum-enabled technologies are compelling, quantum physicists had previously been stymied by the most significant obstacle to building reliable quantum technologies -- 'decoherence' or the randomization of quantum systems by their environments. (2017-01-14)

Meeting with OBGYN prior to first exam empowers young women in medical settings
A new national survey by Orlando Health found that nearly 40 percent of women were at least somewhat concerned about what would happen during their first OBGYN exam. That's why experts at Orlando Health are encouraging girls and their parents to speak with their OBGYN in a non-clinical setting before their first exam. (2018-05-14)

UA-led NASA survey seen as steppingstone for astronomy
By studying dust in the habitable zones of nearby stars, the HOSTS Survey -- led by University of Arizona astronomers and performed with Arizona telescopes -- is helping to determine how big future telescopes should be, which stars are likely candidates for harboring Earth-like planets and what the average star system looks like. (2018-04-02)

Higher aerobic fitness levels are associated with better word production skills in healthy older adults
Researchers found that older adults' aerobic fitness levels are directly related to the incidence of age-related language failures such as 'tip-of-the-tongue' states. (2018-04-30)

A new study provides a solid evidence for global warming
The new study allows a more accurate assessment of how much heat has accumulated in the ocean (and Earth) system. It will be a valuable resource for future studies of oceanic variability and its climatic impacts on both regional and global scales. (2017-03-13)

At first blush, you look happy -- or sad, or angry
Our faces broadcast our feelings in living color -- even when we don't move a muscle. That's the conclusion of a groundbreaking study into human expressions of emotion, which found that people are able to correctly identify other people's feelings up to 75 percent of the time -- based solely on subtle shifts in blood flow color around the nose, eyebrows, cheeks or chin. (2018-03-19)

Machine learning and quantum mechanics team up to understand water at the atomic level
Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why heavy water has a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study, led by researchers in EPFL and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics. (2019-01-07)

Young girls less likely to attribute brilliance to their own gender
Six-year-old girls are less likely than boys to believe that members of their gender are brilliant, reports a new study, which also found that girls at this age are more likely to shy away from activities said to be for children who are 'really, really smart.' (2017-01-26)

Who shared fake news on Facebook during the 2016 US presidential election?
Although most Facebook users did not share any fake news articles during the 2016 US presidential campaign, a new study reveals that the small number who did were mostly Americans over the age of 65. The findings suggest the need for renewed attention to educate particular vulnerable subgroups, such as those over the age of 65, about fake news. (2019-01-09)

Water worlds could support life, study says
The conditions for life surviving on planets entirely covered in water are more fluid than previously thought, opening up the possibility that water worlds could be habitable, according to a new paper from the University of Chicago and Pennsylvania State University. (2018-08-31)

Making mistakes while studying actually helps you learn better
Contrary to popular belief, when a person makes a mistake while learning, it improves their memory for the right information, but only if the error is close to the correct answer, according to a study published in the journal, Memory. (2018-06-11)

Letting the data speak for itself
A new statistical approach for environmental measurements lets the data determine how to model extreme events. (2017-09-12)

Stereotypes about 'brilliance' affect girls' interests as early as age 6, new study finds
By the age of 6, girls become less likely than boys to associate brilliance with their own gender and are more likely to avoid activities said to require brilliance, shows a new study conducted by researchers at New York University, the University of Illinois, and Princeton University. (2017-01-26)

Video games linked to poor relationships with friends, family
The study of young adults connected video games to poor relationships with peers and with parents -- measured by things like time, trust, support and affection. (2009-01-23)

Using artificial intelligence to detect discrimination
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination -- such as on the basis of race or gender -- has been created by researchers at Penn State and Columbia University. (2019-07-10)

Psychology paper authors range from Dr. Phil to the Dalai Lama
Steven Jay Lynn, distinguished professor of psychology and director of the Psychological Clinic at Binghamton University, and Scott O. Lilienfeld of Emory University examined 78 authors or co-authors that may be surprising to the psychology world. Their new paper focuses on these unconventional authors who contributed to esteemed books of psychology research that audiences might find surprising. (2016-10-17)

Tumor-trained T cells go on patrol
In cancer, immune cells infiltrate tumors -- but it hasn't been known which immune cells exit the tumor or where they go next. Garvan researchers have shown that activated T cells are the main immune cell to leave tumors, and that these T cells move to other tumors and to draining lymph nodes The findings will inform the development of T-cell-based immunotherapies for metastatic cancer. (2017-05-15)

Family favoritism: Younger siblings impacted more
A new study shows if a younger sibling feels like they're the favorite and their parents agree, their relationship is strengthened. With older siblings, whether they feel favored or not, it has no major effect on the relationship. (2017-11-02)

Two 'noses' are necessary for flies to navigate well
By developing a new method to (2007-12-23)

New study improves 'crowd wisdom' estimates
In a new study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, researchers Albert Kao (Harvard University), Andrew Berdahl (Santa Fe Institute), and their colleagues examined just how accurate our collective intelligence is and how individual bias and information sharing skew aggregate estimates. Using their findings, they developed a mathematical correction that takes into account bias and social information to generate an improved crowd estimate. (2018-04-18)

Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought
After analyzing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists from the University of Bristol has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually much less than previously thought. (2017-11-29)

Do you know the carbon footprint of your food choices?
Consumers greatly underestimate the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with their food choices, but they'll favor items with a lower carbon footprint if they're given clear information on the label, according to new research from the University of Technology Sydney and Duke University. (2018-12-17)

How 'knowing less' can boost language development in children
Children may learn new words better when they learn them in the context of other words they are just learning -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers investigated how 18- to 24-month-olds learn new words -- in the context of words they already know well and those they don't. The findings help explain how children learn new words and suggest a new way that parents and carers could help boost language development. (2019-10-29)

Researchers get humans to think like computers
Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school buses. People aren't supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can. (2019-03-22)

How old does your computer think you are?
Computerised face recognition is an important part of initiatives to develop security systems, in building social networks, in curating photographs, and many other applications. Systems that allow a computer to estimate with precision a person's age based on an analysis of their face are discussed in the International Journal of Applied Pattern Recognition. (2017-09-27)

Was Triceratops a social animal?
Discovering three juvenile Triceratops deposited together in the badlands of Montana is providing new information about this group of ceratopsid dinosaurs: they may have engaged in social behavior for a portion of their life or under certain circumstances. The research by scientists from the Burpee Museum of Natural History, Northern Illinois University, and the American Museum of Natural History is published in the current issue of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. (2009-03-24)

Is your office messy? If so, you may be seen as uncaring, neurotic
An extremely messy personal space seems to lead people to believe the owner of that space is more neurotic and less agreeable, say University of Michigan researchers. (2018-11-27)

Hispanics face significant racial discrimination in New York City's rental housing market
Hispanics experience significant levels of racial discrimination in the rental housing market, according to a new study. Compared to whites, they are 28 percent less likely to have a landlord return their calls and 49 percent less likely to receive an offer at all. (2018-10-24)

Most people overestimate total number of US gun owners
Most people vastly overestimate the population of gun owners in the United States, and it potentially influences how groups approach gun policies, according to a study by two University of Kansas political scientists. (2018-12-10)

Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach
Computer scientists have built and successfully tested a tool designed to detect when websites are hacked by monitoring the activity of email accounts associated with them. The researchers were surprised to find that almost 1 percent of the websites they tested had suffered a data breach during their 18-month study period, regardless of how big the companies' reach and audience are. (2017-12-12)

Brain scans shine light on how we solve clues
Partnered with machine learning, brain scans reveal how people understand objects in our world. (2019-02-25)

Mathematicians deliver formal proof of Kepler Conjecture
A mathematical problem more than 300 years old gets a formal proof with the help of computer formal verification. (2017-06-16)

Page 1 of 8 | 302 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.