Popular Guilt News and Current Events

Popular Guilt News and Current Events, Guilt News Articles.
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Food insecurity can affect your mental health
Food insecurity (FI) affects nearly 795 million people worldwide. Although a complex phenomenon encompassing food availability, affordability, utilization, and even the social norms that define acceptable ways to acquire food, FI can affect people's health beyond its impact on nutrition. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine determined that FI was associated with poorer mental health and specific psychosocial stressors across global regions (149 countries), independent of individuals' socioeconomic status. (2017-04-27)

Do children inherently want to help others?
A new special section of the journal Child Development includes a collection of ten empirical articles and one theoretical article focusing on the predictors, outcomes, and mechanisms related to children's motivations for prosocial actions, such as helping and sharing. (2016-11-22)

Fingerprints lack scientific basis for legal certainty
A new American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) working group report on the quality of latent fingerprint analysis says that courtroom testimony and reports stating or even implying that fingerprints collected from a crime scene belong to a single person are indefensible and lack scientific foundation. (2017-10-05)

Attention, bosses: Why angry employees are bad for business
According to University of Arizona research, employees who are angry are more likely to engage in unethical behavior at work -- even if the source of their anger is not job-related. (2016-11-14)

Why do consumers participate in 'green' programs?
From recycling to reusing hotel towels, consumers who participate in a company's 'green' program are more satisfied with its service, finds a new study co-led by a Michigan State University researcher. (2016-07-22)

Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisions
A lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don't make an effort to live more sustainably or takes steps to ameliorate climate change. But a recent study from Princeton University finds that highlighting the pride people will feel if they take such actions may be a better way to change environmental behaviors. (2018-02-13)

Medically assisted reproduction does not raise risk of preterm birth and low birth weight
Study shows that couples can decide about using medically assisted reproduction free from concerns about increasing the health risks to their baby. (2019-01-14)

Can your brain testify against you?
A review of applications of neuroscience in law, or 'neurolaw,' brings into question the ethical implications that come with the possibility of a person unwillingly revealing their own guilt. (2018-02-02)

Teenagers more likely to plead guilty to crimes they didn't commit
Teenagers are more likely to plead guilty to crimes they did not commit because they are less able to make mature decisions, new research shows. (2018-03-15)

Paper: 'No admit-No deny' settlements undercut accountability in civil enforcement
The failure of federal watchdog agencies to require admissions of guilt from the targets of civil enforcement can trigger calls for greater accountability from the public, says a new paper from U. of I. law professors Verity Winship and Jennifer K. Robbennolt. (2017-05-22)

Eliminating injustice imposed by the death penalty
The Black Lives Matter movement has called for the abolition of capital punishment in response to what it calls 'the war against Black people' and 'Black communities.' This article defends the two central contentions in the movement's abolitionist stance: first, that US capital punishment practices represent a wrong to black communities, and second, that the most defensible remedy for this wrong is the abolition of the death penalty. (2018-03-19)

Men's porn habits could fuel partners' eating disorders, study suggests
A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests. In addition to finding an association between a partner's porn habits and eating disorder symptoms, the research also found a higher incidence of those symptoms in women who said they feel pressure from their boyfriends or husbands to be thin. (2019-02-14)

New equation reveals how other people's fortunes affect our happiness
A new equation, showing how our happiness depends not only on what happens to us but also how this compares to other people, has been developed by UCL researchers funded by Wellcome. The team developed an equation to predict happiness in 2014, highlighting the importance of expectations, and the new updated equation also takes into account other people's fortunes. (2016-06-14)

Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged children
Children as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. Although young children are sometimes prescribed antidepressants, a psychotherapeutic intervention is needed. Researchers adapted Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), (a validated treatment for disruptive behavioral disorders in children), by adding new emotional development content. PCIT-ED treatment resulted in significant improvements in depression for both children and their parents, suggesting PCIT-ED as a powerful and low-risk approach to the treatment of preschool depression. (2018-06-20)

Where belief in free will is linked to happiness
Free will describes the ability to make independent choices, where the outcome of the choice is not influenced by past events. In this study, researchers show that Chinese teenagers who believe in free will also show increased happiness, suggesting that this phenomenon is not influenced by Western/Asian cultural differences. (2017-01-23)

Bias keeps women with higher body weights away from the doctor -- Drexel study
The stigma of weight and internalized feelings relating to it were found in a Drexel University study to be associated with healthcare avoidance in women with higher body weights. (2018-04-23)

Smartphone addiction leads to personal, social, workplace problems
Excessive smartphone use leads to problems, and females are especially susceptible to addiction, according to new research from Binghamton University- State University of New York. (2017-04-12)

Scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators
Luxembourg, 14 March 2018 - Scientists should choose their associates carefully, researchers at the University of Luxembourg and the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim, recommend, as future misconduct by colleagues could seriously impact the reputation of their former collaborators. (2018-03-15)

Probiotic may help treat colic in infants
Probiotics -- or 'good bacteria' -- have been used to treat infant colic with varying success. In a new trial published in the journal Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, investigators have shown that drops containing a particular probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12) reduced the duration of daily crying by more than 50% in 80% of the 40 infants who received the probiotic once daily for 28 days, with beneficial effects on sleep duration and on stool frequency and consistency. (2019-12-04)

Perpetrators of genocide say they're 'good people'
The men who were tried for their role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed up to 1 million people want you to know that they're actually very good people. That's the most common way accused men try to account for their actions in testimony before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, a new study has found. (2017-10-05)

McLean successfully integrates spirituality and religion with mental health treatment
McLean Hospital clinicians describe the success of the hospital's Spiritual Psychotherapy for Inpatient, Residential & Intensive Treatment (SPIRIT) program. (2019-09-19)

Mental distress due to abortion lasts for years
Women who have had an abortion still experience mental distress related to the abortion years after it happened. A study published today in the open access journal BMC Medicine reveals that five years on, women who have had an abortion suffer higher levels of mental distress than other women and than women who have had a miscarriage. (2005-12-11)

Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder
Behavioural problems in young people with severe antisocial behaviour -- known as conduct disorder -- could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham. (2019-04-18)

Loss of first baby tooth a positive experience for children
Scared, ashamed, happy or proud -- how do children feel when they lose their first baby tooth? An interdisciplinary research group at the University of Zurich has now found that children's feelings are predominantly positive. The study also reveals that previous visits to the dentist's as well as parental background and level of education affect how children experience the loss of their first tooth. (2018-10-24)

Video games depict religion as violent, problematized, MU study shows
Greg Perreault, a doctoral student in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, found that the many newer-generation video games equate religion with violence in the game narratives. (2012-02-27)

White children more positive toward blacks after learning about racism, study shows
Challenging the idea that racism education could be harmful to students, a new study from The University of Texas at Austin found the results of learning about historical racism are primarily positive. The study appears in the November/December issue of the journal Child Development. (2007-11-15)

Research highlights need for better support for thousands of informal dementia carers
Directly involving the thousands of family members and friends who serve as 'informal carers' for people with dementia in the evaluation of patients' symptoms and behaviour could offer improved insights for healthcare professionals and help alleviate feelings of stress, guilt and isolation felt by many who fulfil these duties, a new study has found. (2018-02-02)

Nostalgia safeguards against negative feelings
Psychologists discover strong correlations between Americans' glorification of their country, nostalgia for the past, and the rejection of collective guilt regarding past crimes. (2018-02-07)

Study: Are birth mothers satisfied with decisions to place children for adoption?
New research findings from Baylor University's Diana R. Garland School of Social Work could change the adoption landscape for birth mothers struggling with the life-altering decision to place their children. How is a birth mother's level of satisfaction -- that feeling that the right decision was made -- affected by time? (2018-06-08)

Shameful secrets bother us more than guilty secrets
Everyone has secrets, but what causes someone to think about them over and over again? People who feel shame about a secret, as opposed to guilt, are more likely to be consumed by thoughts of what they are hiding, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-02-11)

Brains of young people with severe behavioral problems are 'wired differently'
Latest research from an international team of psychologists and neuroscientists points to subtle differences in brain connectivity impacting young people with Conduct Disorder. (2018-04-30)

Smokers' memories could help them quit
Rather than inciting fear, anti-smoking campaigns should tap into smokers' memories and tug at their heartstrings, finds a new study by Michigan State University researchers. (2017-02-16)

Study examines how heartfelt guilt affects individuals
For thousands of years, people have closely associated moral cleanliness with acts of physical cleanliness. A recent study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology explored this association by eliciting guilt, a threat to one's moral purity. (2018-09-19)

Are you prone to feeling guilty? Then you're probably more trustworthy, study shows
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that when it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt. (2018-07-19)

Survivors' near-miss experiences on 9/11 linked to post-traumatic stress
People who narrowly avoid disaster do not necessarily escape tragedy unharmed, and their knowledge of the victims' fate shapes how survivors respond to traumatic events, according to the results of a new paper by a UB psychologist that explores the effects of near-miss experiences associated with the 9/11 terrorist attacks. (2019-07-11)

Study advocates psychological screening for the carers of child burn victims
A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology highlights the need for psychological screening for families/primary caregivers after a child sustains a burn injury. (2018-11-06)

Motivation to end racism relies on 'yes we can' approach
If you're trying to end racism, it's not enough to get people to understand that racism is still a problem. You also have to make them feel like they can do something about it, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2010-11-29)

The parenthood paradox
Does being an intense mother make women unhappy? According to a new study by Kathryn Rizzo and colleagues, from the University of Mary Washington in the US, women who believe in intensive parenting -- i.e., that women are better parents than men, that mothering should be child-centered, and that children should be considered sacred and are fulfilling to parents -- are more likely to have negative mental health outcomes. The work is published online in Springer's Journal of Child and Family Studies. (2012-07-05)

An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrow
When bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. It can also ruin theirs, though, and lead to major behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work. New research from Michigan State University took prior workplace studies, which focused primarily on the impact abusive bosses have on their employees, and refocused the lens to see how the bosses respond to their own abusive behavior. (2018-06-04)

How to boost sales of fair trade and sustainable goods
When consumers are given responsibility for whether a product is produced, a stronger link develops between consumers and production that leads to anticipated feelings of guilt or gratification depending on the ethicality of the production process, which then influences purchase intentions. (2019-12-04)

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