Popular HIV Infection News and Current Events | Page 25

Popular HIV Infection News and Current Events, HIV Infection News Articles.
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Some of the principal treatments for osteoporosis could reduce the incidence of COVID-19
A joint study by physicians at Hospital del Mar, researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Pompeu Fabra University and the Pere Virgili Health Care Park suggests that certain drugs used to treat osteoporosis are safe for COVID-19 patients and could even have a protective effect. The results support the recommendations of the scientific guidelines relating to the desirability of maintaining treatments for osteoporosis in patients with COVID-19. This is the first study of its kind in the world. (2020-11-03)

Syphilis infections on the rise in Europe
New data released in ECDC's Annual Epidemiological report show that since 2010, the overall syphilis rates have been going up across Europe, particularly among men. In 2014, the reported syphilis numbers were six times higher in men than in women. Almost two-thirds (63 percent) of the syphilis cases reported with information on transmission category were recorded in men who have sex with men. (2016-05-18)

Device will rapidly, accurately and inexpensively detect the Zika virus at airports
About the size of a tablet, a portable device that could be used in a host of environments like a busy airport or even a remote location in South America, may hold the key to detecting the dreaded Zika virus accurately, rapidly and inexpensively using just a saliva sample. For about $2 and within 15 minutes, researchers hope to accurately determine whether or not an individual has an active infection. (2017-02-22)

HIV patients at greater risk for bone fractures
HIV-infected patients have a higher prevalence of fractures than non HIV-infected patients, across both genders and critical fracture sites according to a new study accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2008-08-28)

Effects of bacterial pneumonia no worse for HIV-positive patients
Pneumonia doesn't appear to harm HIV-positive patients any more than those without HIV, according to a new international study conducted in part by the University of Alberta. (2005-09-26)

Pregnant women with placental infection have doubled risk of recurrence
Pregnant women who develop an infection of the placenta or nearby membranes in their first pregnancy have twice the risk of getting it in their second pregnancy, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. (2006-11-30)

Researchers use new finding to clear bloodstream malaria infection in mice
University of Iowa researchers and colleagues have discovered how malaria manipulates the immune system to allow the parasite to persist in the bloodstream. By rescuing this immune system pathway, the research team was able to cure mice of bloodstream malaria infections. (2011-12-12)

HIV infection doubles risk of heart disease, global study finds
People infected with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from heart disease, research has found. Analysis of global figures reveals that HIV-associated cardiovascular disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years as more people are living longer with the virus. The greatest impact is in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia Pacific regions, with Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho particularly affected. (2018-07-18)

Teen tattoos: 1/2 of parents concerned about negative health effects, impact on employment
78 percent of parents said they would 'absolutely not consider it' if their teen asked about a tattoo. (2018-08-20)

Researchers compare visceral leishmaniasis diagnostic tests
Accurate and timely diagnosis of the tropic disease visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the pillars for reducing VL deaths. Currently available serological tests for diagnosing VL vary widely in their performance and may, as a whole, be inadequate for VL diagnosis, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (2019-07-18)

Syringe exchange programs prevented thousands of new HIV cases in Philadelphia, Baltimore
Syringe exchange programs established in Philadelphia and Baltimore prevented a total of 12,483 new cases of HIV over a 10-year period, according to a study published today. The averted HIV infections also saved both cities millions of dollars every year, according to the researchers. (2019-10-29)

Zika virus protein mapped to speed search for cure
A study published today reports that a team led by Indiana University scientists has mapped a key protein that causes the Zika virus to reproduce and spread. (2017-03-27)

AIDS research prize for Warwick academic
A researcher at the University of Warwick has received international recognition for his contribution to AIDS research. Dr. Olalekan Uthman, assistant professor in research synthesis at the University's Warwick Medical School, has received the award for co-authoring the most cited article in the prestigious journal AIDS. (2015-08-04)

Aviragen Therapeutics licenses Georgia State Technology to develop antiviral therapies
The Georgia State University Research Foundation has entered into a licensing and sponsored research agreement with Aviragen Therapeutics, Inc., a Georgia-based pharmaceutical company developing the next generation of antivirals, to develop and commercialize respiratory syncytial virus replication inhibitors. (2016-07-05)

Bumblebees use nicotine to fight off parasites
Bumblebees that have been infected by parasites seek out flowers with nicotine in the nectar, likely to fight off the infection, new research has found. The nicotine appears to slow the progression of disease in infected bees but has harmful effects when consumed by healthy bees. (2015-04-27)

Many at risk for HIV despite lifesaving pill
Multiple barriers may stop high-risk individuals from accessing an HIV drug that can reduce the subsequent risk of infection, according to a new University of Michigan study. (2018-06-11)

New study identifies gaps in infection prevention and control at critical access hospitals
Critical access hospitals (CAHs) face significant challenges in their infection prevention and control (IPC) practices, according to new research presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). CAH is a designation given by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to rural hospitals with 25 beds or less that are located at least 35 miles away from other hospitals. (2018-06-13)

NIH-supported scientists develop tool to measure success of HIV cure strategies
Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a new assay to accurately and easily count the cells that comprise the HIV reservoir, the stubborn obstacle to an HIV cure. This advance will enable researchers who are trying to eliminate the HIV reservoir to clearly understand whether their strategies are working. The research was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. (2019-01-30)

HPV infection may be behind rise in vocal-cord cancers among young nonsmokers
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team finds evidence that the remarkable recent increase in vocal-cord cancer in young adults appears to be the result of infection with strains of human papilloma virus that also cause cervical cancer and other malignancies. (2019-02-07)

Study presents drug candidate for reversing mucosal barrier damage by HIV
Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital led by Raina Fichorova, MD, PhD, in collaboration with an international team, tested a laboratory-made version of a naturally occurring protein (recombinant fragment of human Surfactant Protein D or rfhSP-D) on bioengineered vaginal tissues, immune cells and microbes to determine if the drug candidate could help prevent HIV transmission safely. (2019-05-06)

BU finds PTSD nearly doubles infection risk
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first to examine the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dozens of infection types in a nationwide cohort. Published in the journal Epidemiology, it is also the first to find that PTSD affects infection risks for men and women differently, having, for example, more of an effect on a woman's risk of urinary tract infection and a man's risk of skin infection. (2019-10-15)

Will the COVID-19 virus become endemic?
A new article in the journal Science by Columbia Mailman School researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature producing recurring outbreaks in humans. (2020-10-15)

Human rights protections essential in drive for universal access
The call for human rights as a fundamental component of efforts to prevent new infections and provide treatment for people living with HIV pervaded the XVIII International AIDS Conference today as delegates and local residents prepared for the HIV and Human Rights March through the streets of Vienna this evening. Conference participants are giving voice to the conference theme of Rights Here, Right Now through a number of plenary presentations, sessions and Global Village and Youth Program activities. (2010-07-20)

Limited HIV testing access for Baltimore youth
A new survey of 51 youth-serving, nonclinical, community-based organizations in Baltimore, Maryland, found that the majority did not offer HIV testing, nor did they have established links to refer youth to testing. Organizations that did provide HIV tests were more likely to offer general health services and referral services for sexually transmitted infections screening outside of HIV, and had staff members who were more comfortable talking about sexual health issues. (2017-01-26)

Scientists uncover possible therapeutic targets for rare autism spectrum disorder
Researchers have uncovered 30 genes that could, one day, serve as therapeutic targets to reverse Rett syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that affects only girls and is a severe form of an autism spectrum disorder. (2017-01-30)

Infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus i
Less than fifty percent of HIV-infected patients achieve viral suppression in medically underserved areas. Clinicians practicing in these areas must be aware of the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular complications observed in patients with untreated or poorly treated HIV. (2016-08-03)

Statement of concern on detention of Drs. Kamiar and Arash Alaei by Iranian authorities
Barry R. Bloom, dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, today expressed (2008-08-08)

Synthetic molecule 'kicks and kills' some persistent HIV in mice
Scientists have designed a synthetic molecule that can reactivate dormant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in mice and lead to the death of some of the infected cells, according to a study published in PLOS Pathogens. (2017-09-21)

Proteins found in semen increase the spread of Ebola virus infection
Protein fragments, called amyloid fibrils, in human semen significantly increase Ebola virus infection and protect the virus against harsh environmental conditions such as heat and dehydration. Follow-up studies from the 2014 epidemic found that men can harbor the virus in their semen for at least 2.5 years, with the potential to transmit the virus sexually during that time. Targeting amyloids in semen may prevent a sexually transmitted spread of the Ebola virus. (2018-06-25)

Computer simulations predict the spread of HIV
In a recently published study in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory show that computer simulations can accurately predict the transmission of HIV across populations, which could aid in preventing the disease. (2018-08-01)

Manganese plays a key role in bacterial infection
The ability to acquire manganese during infection is essential for the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis in animals, according to a study published Sept. 20, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by José Lemos of the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and colleagues. (2018-09-20)

Faulty immune receptor could be reason why many face HIV complications
Michigan State University scientists have discovered SLAMF7, an immune receptor, has the ability to tone down the body's immune response when activated on certain white blood cells, called 'monocytes.' The finding was made after studying both healthy and HIV-infected patients. Yet, for certain HIV patients who experience a myriad of health issues, the researchers found that these patients' receptors don't work properly. (2019-01-07)

'Test and Treat' reduces new HIV infections by a third in southern Africa communities
Results from largest ever HIV prevention trial suggest strategy could make a significant contribution to controlling epidemic. (2019-03-05)

First ever living donor HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant
For the first time, a person living with HIV has donated a kidney to a transplant recipient also living with HIV. A multidisciplinary team from Johns Hopkins Medicine completed the living donor HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant on March 25, 2019. The doctors say both the donor and the recipient are doing well. (2019-03-28)

Female bedbugs 'control' their immune systems ahead of mating to prevent against STIs
Female bedbugs who are 'full bellied' and therefore more attractive mates for males, are able to boost their immune systems in anticipation of catching sexually transmitted infections, research has found. (2019-07-01)

USPSTF recommends screening for hepatitis B virus infection in pregnant women
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services and this statement is a reaffirmation of its 2009 recommendation. (2019-07-23)

Healing power of honey
Sandwiching nano-layers of manuka honey between layers of surgical mesh inhibits bacteria for up to three weeks as the honey is slowly released, new research shows. (2019-12-03)

IU study: Screening and treating girls doesn't reduce prevalence of chlamydia in teens
Frequent testing and treatment of infection does not reduce the prevalence of chlamydia in urban teenage girls, according to a long term study by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers published in the Jan. 1, 2010, issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. (2010-01-07)

The Lancet Oncology (TLO) and The Lancet Infectious Diseases (TLID)
The first review in this month's TLO reviews the epidemiological evidence linking cancer incidence as a result of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear explosion in the Ukraine. (2002-05-01)

Scripps research scientists devise approach that stops HIV at earliest stage of infection
Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a new two-punch strategy against HIV and they have already successfully tested aspects of it in the laboratory. (2008-02-27)

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