Popular Happiness News and Current Events

Popular Happiness News and Current Events, Happiness News Articles.
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How the UK smoking ban increased wellbeing
Married women with children reported the largest increase in well-being following the smoking bans in the UK in 2006 and 2007 but there was no comparable increase for married men with children. (2017-12-04)

Can't buy me love: Materialism in marriage linked to devaluation of marriage
Researchers in BYU's School of Family Life have provided more insight into what may be one of the roots of the dissatisfaction caused by materialism -- a diminished view of the importance of marriage itself.  (2018-02-13)

Science confirms you should stop and smell the roses
A UBC researcher says there's truth to the idea that spending time outdoors is a direct line to happiness. In fact, Holli-Anne Passmore says if people simply take time to notice the nature around them, it will increase their general happiness and well-being. (2017-11-03)

Psychologists find pursuit of happiness not a straight path
Happily ever after isn't a given. Achievable, yes, says a Michigan State University psychologist. But after analyzing years of data tracking people through their lives of joys and sorrows, scientists conclude that major changes in life circumstances -- like marriage, divorce or debilitating illness -- can indeed have long-term impact on happiness levels. (2007-03-08)

The ways of wisdom in schizophrenia
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that persons with schizophrenia scored lower on a wisdom assessment than non-psychiatric comparison participants, but that there was considerable variability in levels of wisdom, and those with higher scores displayed fewer psychotic symptoms. (2019-02-14)

Sit, stay, heal: Study finds therapy dogs help stressed university students
Therapy dog sessions for stressed-out students are an increasingly popular offering at North American universities. Now, new research from the University of British Columbia confirms that some doggy one-on-one time really can do the trick of boosting student wellness. (2018-03-12)

In China, a link between happiness and air quality
In a paper published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, a research team led by Siqi Zheng, the Samuel Tak Lee Associate Professor in MIT's Department of Urban Studies and Planning and Center for Real Estate, and the Faculty Director of MIT China Future City Lab, reveals that higher levels of pollution are associated with a decrease in people's happiness levels. (2019-01-21)

Empathetic people experience dogs' expressions more strongly
A study by the University of Helsinki and Aalto University explored how empathy and other psychological factors affect people's assessments of the facial images of dogs and humans. (2017-02-03)

What makes a happy working mom?
A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother. So says Katrijn Brenning of the University of Ghent in Belgium who led research that investigated what affects a working mother's sense of well-being. The study is published in Springer's Journal of Happiness Studies. (2017-12-06)

Phone-addicted teens are unhappy
Researchers found that teens who spent a lot of time in front of screen devices -- playing computer games, using more social media, texting and video chatting -- were less happy than those who invested time in non-screen activities like sports, reading newspapers and magazines, and face-to-face social interaction. The happiest teens used digital media for less than an hour per day. But after a daily hour of screen time, unhappiness rises steadily along with increasing screen time (2018-01-22)

How parenting styles influence our attitudes to marriage
Research from Japan has revealed how different parenting styles can affect marriage rates and desired number of children. (2017-02-02)

Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood
Participating in spiritual practices during childhood and adolescence may be a protective factor for a range of health and well-being outcomes in early adulthood, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (2018-09-14)

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (2018-06-01)

Open relationships just as satisfying as monogamous ones, U of G study reveals
Couples in non-monogamous relationships have the same level of relationship satisfaction, psychological well-being and sexual satisfaction as those in monogamous relationships, a new University of Guelph study has found. (2018-06-28)

For some people, attractive wives and high status husbands enhance marital quality
Researchers from Florida State University found that maximizing men -- those who seek to make the 'best' choice -- who had attractive wives were more satisfied at the start of their marriages than maximizing men who had less attractive wives, and maximizing women who had high status husbands experienced less steep declines in satisfaction over time than maximizing women who had low status husbands. (2019-03-28)

Breast reconstruction patients often less satisfied than expected post surgery
Many breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy with or without immediate reconstruction mispredict future satisfaction with aspects of physical and sexual health post-surgery, according to a new study published by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James). (2018-02-16)

New equation reveals how other people's fortunes affect our happiness
A new equation, showing how our happiness depends not only on what happens to us but also how this compares to other people, has been developed by UCL researchers funded by Wellcome. The team developed an equation to predict happiness in 2014, highlighting the importance of expectations, and the new updated equation also takes into account other people's fortunes. (2016-06-14)

Maternal depressive emotion associated with children's sleep problems
Maternal depressive mood during the prenatal and postnatal periods is related to child sleep disturbances, according to recent pilot data from a longitudinal cohort study in kindergarten children. (2018-06-05)

Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways
Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a Baylor University study has found. (2019-01-07)

Social media does not decrease face-to-face interactions, MU study finds
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Kansas have found that social media use has no significant negative effect on social interactions or social well-being. (2018-03-01)

Self-defeating humor promotes psychological well-being, study reveals
Researchers from the University of Granada provide new data on the consequences of using different styles of humor, emphasizing the importance of analyzing cultural differences in future psychological research. (2018-02-08)

Materialism and loneliness: Is there really a vicious cycle?
Despite being much-maligned, materialism is not always bad for consumers. Loneliness may cause materialism, but the opposite is not necessarily true, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. (2013-07-26)

Study: Get moving to get happier
Physical activity has long been known to reduce depression and anxiety, and is commonly prescribed to prevent or cure negative mental health conditions. (2018-04-04)

Study offers more food for thought on kids' eating habits, emotions
A University of Texas at Dallas psychologist has examined the preconceptions about the effects of emotions on children's eating habits, creating the framework for future studies of how dietary patterns evolve in early childhood. Dr. Shayla C. Holub, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, demonstrated that children from 4½ to 9 years old chose chocolate candy over goldfish crackers more frequently in response to both happiness and sadness. (2018-02-21)

it's not if, but how people use social media that impacts their well-being
New research from UBC Okanagan indicates what's most important for overall happiness is how a person uses social media. Derrick Wirtz, an associate professor of teaching in psychology at the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, took a close look at how people use three major social platforms--Facebook, Twitter and Instagram--and how that use can impact a person's overall well-being. (2020-11-02)

Moderate Facebook use promotes happiness in adults with Autism spectrum disorder
Among adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a new study has shown that those who use Facebook, in moderation, are happier than those who do not. (2018-03-12)

Where belief in free will is linked to happiness
Free will describes the ability to make independent choices, where the outcome of the choice is not influenced by past events. In this study, researchers show that Chinese teenagers who believe in free will also show increased happiness, suggesting that this phenomenon is not influenced by Western/Asian cultural differences. (2017-01-23)

Not enjoying your dinner out? Try putting the phone away
Researchers looking at the effect of smartphones on face-to-face social interactions found that people who used their devices while out for dinner with friends and family enjoyed themselves less than those who did not. (2018-02-26)

Can pursuing happiness make you unhappy?
Researchers have found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they do not have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy. Aekyoung Kim of Rutgers University in the US and Sam Maglio of the University of Toronto Scarborough in Canada have investigated this effect in a study in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, which is published by Springer and is an official journal of the Psychonomic Society. (2018-03-12)

From San Diego to Italy, study suggests wisdom can protect against loneliness
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were. (2020-10-01)

Why economic growth does not necessarily contribute to human happiness
Economic growth in developed countries has a dual effect. On one hand, people's living standards and consumer spending are on the rise, but on the other hand, this does not necessarily make people happy and may in fact erode subjective well-being and lead to economic crises. A new study by an international team that included Francesco Sarracino, HSE LCSR Senior Associate Researcher, examines the reasons behind this phenomenon. (2018-03-13)

The first happiness genes have been located
For the first time in history, researchers have isolated the parts of the human genome that could explain the differences in how humans experience happiness. These are the findings of a large-scale international study in over 298,000 people, conducted by VU Amsterdam professors Meike Bartels (Genetics and Wellbeing) and Philipp Koellinger (Genoeconomics). (2016-04-25)

Researchers teach computer to recognize emotions in speech
Experts of the Faculty of Informatics, Mathematics, and Computer Science at the Higher School of Economics have created an automatic system capable of identifying emotions in the sound of a voice. Their report was presented at a major international conference -- Neuroinformatics-2017. (2017-11-08)

Money only buys happiness for a certain amount
There is an optimal point to how much money it takes to make an individual happy, and that amount varies worldwide, according to research from Purdue University. (2018-02-13)

At first blush, you look happy -- or sad, or angry
Our faces broadcast our feelings in living color -- even when we don't move a muscle. That's the conclusion of a groundbreaking study into human expressions of emotion, which found that people are able to correctly identify other people's feelings up to 75 percent of the time -- based solely on subtle shifts in blood flow color around the nose, eyebrows, cheeks or chin. (2018-03-19)

Study examines how sensitivity to emotions changes across the lifespan
Why do we become more positive as we grow older? Why are adolescents so sensitive to negative social cues? (2019-03-01)

New method helps identify causal mechanisms in depression
People with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, in depression. (2017-12-06)

Positive well-being may protect against depression in people with autism
In an Autism Research study of 36 newly employed adults with autism spectrum disorder who were participating in a supported employment program, positive well-being -- or a sense of happiness and life satisfaction -- was associated with a lower risk of developing depression over 12 months of follow-up. (2019-01-24)

Being wise is good for your health -- review looks at emerging science of wisdom
Can science measure what it means to be wise? A growing body of evidence suggests that wisdom is a complex concept that contributes to mental health and happiness, according to a review in the May/June issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2019-05-14)

Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices - loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). Loving-kindness meditation turned out to be more effective when it comes to increasing happiness, but, in contrast with previous studies, compassion meditation also did not result in a growth of negative emotions. The paper was published in Mindfulness journal. (2020-09-24)

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