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Popular Healthcare Costs News and Current Events

Popular Healthcare Costs News and Current Events, Healthcare Costs News Articles.
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Wait-and-see strategy pays off, incentives needed for risk takers
Some people are quick to purchase the latest technology or sign up for a new service. (2017-09-18)
Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)
Relation of key determinants affecting mental health disorders in greater mekong subregion
This article is a literature review of the relationship of the determinants affecting GMS mental disorders conducted using the defined strategies (2017-11-29)
ICU care for COPD, heart failure and heart attack may not be better
Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit? (2017-02-17)
Motorcycle crashes cause 5 times as many deaths as car accidents, 6 times the health costs
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs. (2017-11-20)
Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035
A new study projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease, the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation's financial and health care systems. (2017-02-14)
Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination rates
A Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months. (2018-01-24)
Austerity policies lie at heart of soaring homelessness and related health harms, argue experts
Austerity policies lie at the heart of soaring homelessness across England, with serious health implications for those affected, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2018-01-29)
UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients
A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender. (2019-01-07)
Women with dementia receive less medical attention
Women with dementia have fewer visits to the GP, receive less health monitoring and take more potentially harmful medication than men with dementia, new UCL research reveals. (2016-12-04)
Enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound guidelines demonstrate improved efficacy and durability
Data released today show that MR-guided focused ultrasound is a more effective option for a broader population of uterine fibroid sufferers. (2007-05-08)
Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. (2017-11-17)
Regular exercise halves complication rate after lung cancer surgery
Exercising regularly before surgery for lung cancer halves the complication rate afterwards, finds a synthesis of the available published evidence in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2018-02-01)
A foodborne illness outbreak could cost a restaurant millions, study suggests
A single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (2018-04-16)
As private funding of biomedical research soars, new risks arise
Academic medical centers (AMCs) in the US are navigating an increasing shift in research funding from historic public funding (e.g., NIH) to private sources such as pharma and biotech companies, foundations, and charities, raising a host of new issues related to collaborative research models, intellectual property rights, and scientific and ethical oversight. (2017-11-27)
Why are minorities underrepresented in genetic cancer studies?
Socio-cultural and clinical factors as well as healthcare processes were important drivers of a woman's willingness to provide saliva specimens for future cancer research. (2017-11-16)
Study reveals benefits of having GPs in Emergency Departments
A new study from the University of Liverpool provides evidence that locating a General Practitioner (GP) in a hospital emergency department (ED) can reduce waiting times and admissions, but may increases antibiotic prescribing. (2017-10-06)
Low value surgical procedures should be avoided to reduce costs and improve patient care
Reducing the use of 'low value' interventions that deliver little benefit is vital to cut healthcare costs. (2017-11-08)
Generous health insurance plans encourage overtreatment, but may not improve health
Offering comprehensive health insurance plans with low deductibles and co-pay in exchange for higher annual premiums seems like a good value for the risk averse, and a profitable product for insurance companies. (2017-06-05)
More people miss NHS appointments when the clocks go forward
The number of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change on March 25 2018. (2018-03-23)
Depression negatively impacts heart and stroke patients
People with cardiovascular disease who haven't been diagnosed with depression but are at high-risk for it are more likely to report worse healthcare experiences and use emergency room services more often than those diagnosed with depression. (2018-04-07)
The cost of opioid use during pregnancy
A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome -- often caused by mothers using opioids during pregnancy -- is increasing in the United States, and carries an enormous burden in terms of hospital days and costs. (2017-06-14)
Obesity increases incidence, severity, costs of knee dislocations
A new national study finds that the obesity epidemic is resulting in a higher risk of knee dislocations as well as serious vascular injuries and higher treatment costs. (2017-11-03)
Obesity drives US health care costs up by 29 percent, varies by state
Recent research by John Cawley, professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, provides new insights on how individual states are affected by the health care costs of obesity. (2018-02-08)
Insomnia prevalent in patients with asthma
A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh has found that insomnia is highly prevalent in adults with asthma and is also associated with worse asthma control, depression and anxiety symptoms and other quality of life and health issues. (2016-12-08)
Cash for weight loss
A new study, published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, has shown that selling rewards programmes to participants entering a weight loss programme is a low cost strategy to increase both the magnitude and duration of weight loss. (2017-06-09)
High-deductible health care plans curb both cost and usage, including preventive care
A team of researchers based at IUPUI has conducted the first systematic review of studies examining the relationship between high-deductible health care plans and the use of health care services. (2017-10-03)
Dartmouth economist outlines reforms to improve access to affordable, high quality child care
For families in the US, the costs of high-quality child care are exorbitant, especially for those with children under age five. (2017-10-22)
Using computers to detect breast cancer
Jeffrey Golden, MD, comments on new research exploring the use of computer algorithms in detecting the spread of breast cancer to lymph nodes. (2017-12-12)
Core outcomes established for multimorbidity research
According to a panel of international experts, clinical trials of multimorbidity should measure and report, at minimum, quality of life, mortality, and mental health outcomes. (2018-03-13)
Tampon makers could help reduce violence against women
Manufacturers of feminine hygiene products, including tampons and sanitary products, could dedicate a part of their revenues to support public health programmes that prevent violence against women, argues an expert in The BMJ this week. (2016-06-28)
Alaskan microgrids offer energy resilience and independence
The electrical grid in the contiguous United States is a behemoth of interconnected systems; if one section fails, millions could be without power. (2017-12-26)
Integrated team-based care shows potential for improving health care quality, use and costs
Among adults enrolled in an integrated health care system, receipt of primary care at integrated team-based care practices compared with traditional practice management practices was associated with higher rates of some measures of quality of care, lower rates for some measures of acute care utilization, and lower actual payments received by the delivery system, according to a study appearing in the Aug. (2016-08-23)
Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fall
Fishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows. (2018-03-29)
Why the bar needs to be raised for human clinical trials
Standards for authorizing first-time trials of drugs in humans are lax, and should be strengthened in several ways, McGill University researchers argue in a paper published today in Nature. (2017-01-30)
Quality of life predicts cancer survival, U-M study finds
Head and neck cancer patients who reported lower physical quality of life were more likely to die from their disease, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. (2008-05-29)
1 in 5 residents overuses electricity at neighbors' expense
Household electricity use falls by more than 30 percent when residents are obliged to pay for their own personal consumption. (2017-03-06)
Cancer drug parity laws lower costs for many, but not everyone
State laws designed to ensure that the pill form of cancer drugs is not costlier than treatments given through an infusion in a clinic or hospital have had a mixed impact on patients' pocketbooks, according to University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. (2017-11-09)
Pre-Medicare years bring health insurance worries for many, U-M/AARP poll finds
With the dawn of a new year, most Americans have just started a new health insurance coverage period -- whether they receive their coverage through a job, buy it themselves or have a government plan. (2019-01-03)
Study: SNAP benefits aren't enough to afford a healthy diet
A new study finds that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, only covers 43-60 percent of what it costs to consume a diet consistent with federal dietary guidelines for what constitutes a healthy diet. (2017-09-07)
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