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Popular Healthcare News and Current Events, Healthcare News Articles.
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Relation of key determinants affecting mental health disorders in greater mekong subregion
This article is a literature review of the relationship of the determinants affecting GMS mental disorders conducted using the defined strategies (2017-11-29)
UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients
A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender. (2019-01-07)
Women with dementia receive less medical attention
Women with dementia have fewer visits to the GP, receive less health monitoring and take more potentially harmful medication than men with dementia, new UCL research reveals. (2016-12-04)
Study reveals benefits of having GPs in Emergency Departments
A new study from the University of Liverpool provides evidence that locating a General Practitioner (GP) in a hospital emergency department (ED) can reduce waiting times and admissions, but may increases antibiotic prescribing. (2017-10-06)
Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. (2017-11-17)
Why are minorities underrepresented in genetic cancer studies?
Socio-cultural and clinical factors as well as healthcare processes were important drivers of a woman's willingness to provide saliva specimens for future cancer research. (2017-11-16)
As private funding of biomedical research soars, new risks arise
Academic medical centers (AMCs) in the US are navigating an increasing shift in research funding from historic public funding (e.g., NIH) to private sources such as pharma and biotech companies, foundations, and charities, raising a host of new issues related to collaborative research models, intellectual property rights, and scientific and ethical oversight. (2017-11-27)
Low value surgical procedures should be avoided to reduce costs and improve patient care
Reducing the use of 'low value' interventions that deliver little benefit is vital to cut healthcare costs. (2017-11-08)
Insomnia prevalent in patients with asthma
A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh has found that insomnia is highly prevalent in adults with asthma and is also associated with worse asthma control, depression and anxiety symptoms and other quality of life and health issues. (2016-12-08)
Core outcomes established for multimorbidity research
According to a panel of international experts, clinical trials of multimorbidity should measure and report, at minimum, quality of life, mortality, and mental health outcomes. (2018-03-13)
Quality of life predicts cancer survival, U-M study finds
Head and neck cancer patients who reported lower physical quality of life were more likely to die from their disease, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. (2008-05-29)
Health visitors use of video helps vulnerable families
The video-based method Marte Meo -- which some municipalities use in their initiatives for families experiencing difficulties with newborn children -- works as intended. (2018-01-26)
Individuals with developmental disabilities experience health care disparities
This research was published in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)
Stroke survivors and caregivers feel abandoned by health services, study finds
A systematic review of studies focused on stroke survivors' and carers' experiences of primary care and community healthcare services has found that they feel abandoned because they have become marginalised by services and do not have the knowledge or skills to re-engage. (2018-02-22)
UTA study finds public-private partnerships key to making telemedicine sustainable
RadhaKanta Mahapatra, a professor in the Department of Information Systems and Operations Management in the UTA College of Business, conducted the study, A Collaborative Approach to Creating ICT-based Sustainable Development, which was published as part of the Americas Conference on Information Systems' proceedings earlier this year. (2017-09-22)
Study finds that most older adults are aware of medication risks
Most older adults are aware of medication risks, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2017-09-18)
Study reveals growing severity of US firearm injuries requiring hospital admission since early 90s
New data published in the journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open today show an annual increase in severity of non-fatal firearm injuries needing hospital admission across the United States since the early 1990s. (2018-02-28)
Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat. (2017-01-18)
Novel blueprint for faster implementation of more evidence-based healthcare solutions
Indiana University and Regenstrief Institute investigators have developed and tested Agile Implementation -- a catalytic platform for transforming the current healthcare delivery system (HC 1.0) into a patient and family centric, high reliability, learning healthcare delivery system (HC 2.0). (2018-03-26)
Health staff 'too stressed' to deal with disasters
Increasing stress and a lack of motivation among healthcare staff could result in hospitals having to shut down in the wake of a major incident such as flooding or an earthquake, according to new research published in the journal Procedia Engineering. (2018-02-26)
The big ethical questions for artificial intelligence in healthcare
AI in healthcare is developing rapidly, with many applications currently in use or in development in the UK and worldwide. (2018-05-15)
Revised trainee guidelines permit full spectrum of 'conscientious objection'
Trainee doctors and nurses can opt out of providing certain aspects of sexual and reproductive healthcare, but only if they can ensure that patients' needs are still being met, whatever their own personal beliefs, say new guidelines on 'conscientious objection' from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. (2017-12-07)
Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study reveals
They have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was. (2018-03-13)
Following Presidential action, AGS renews call for bipartisan collaboration
Presidential action to alter current law risks undermining progress made by Congress, the American people, and a cadre of healthcare stakeholders to improve care access, care quality, and care costs for us all as we age, so say experts at the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) evaluating recent orders by the Trump Administration. (2017-10-13)
AGS statement on discrimination
The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) opposes discrimination against healthcare professionals or older people based on race, color, religion, gender (including gender identity, sexual orientation, and pregnancy), disability, age, or national origin. (2017-01-31)
Veterans health administration hospitals outperform non-VHA hospitals in most markets
In a new study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the White River Junction VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, used the most current publicly available data to compare health outcomes for VA and non-VA hospitals within 121 local healthcare markets that included both a VA medical center and a non-VA hospital. (2018-12-10)
Bias keeps women with higher body weights away from the doctor -- Drexel study
The stigma of weight and internalized feelings relating to it were found in a Drexel University study to be associated with healthcare avoidance in women with higher body weights. (2018-04-23)
Once a lesbian always a lesbian, right? Or not?
Are people's sexual attractions likely to change as they age? (2017-10-11)
Kidney disease patients have higher out-of-pocket costs than stroke and cancer patients
Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a Loyola University Chicago study published in BMC Nephrology. (2017-01-17)
MRSA colonization common in groin and rectal areas
Colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus allows people in the community to unknowingly harbor and spread this life-threatening bacteria. (2014-08-13)
Study: Individuals with developmental disabilities experience health care disparities
A study from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center highlights the importance of disability education for health care clinicians. (2017-09-11)
Study tracks impact of neonatal abstinence syndrome on state Medicaid programs?
In the United States, one infant is born every 15 minutes with withdrawal symptoms after being exposed to opioids before birth, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics. (2018-03-26)
Surgical infections linked to drug-resistant bugs, study suggests
People having surgery in low income countries are more likely to develop an infection than those in wealthier nations, which may be linked to drug-resistant bacteria, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests. (2018-02-13)
Web-based decision aid may help with breast reconstruction decisions following mastectomy
A new Psycho-Oncology study indicates that a free web-based decision aid that helps women with breast cancer make decisions regarding reconstruction surgery after mastectomy is likely cost-effective. (2018-04-05)
Flu vaccines for nursing home workers effective in reducing outbreaks: study
Higher flu vaccination rates for health care personnel can dramatically reduce the threat of flu outbreak among nursing home residents, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2011-09-12)
Better social support and access to exercise classes could help people with lung conditions
Research has found that contact with healthcare professionals, support from peers and access to regular organized exercise sessions help people with chronic lung conditions to be physically active. (2018-07-02)
Screening for fracture risk in postmenopausal women is cost-effective
A recent Journal of Bone and Mineral Research analysis indicates that screening for fracture risk in older postmenopausal women is a good use of healthcare resources--in other words, it's cost-effective. (2018-02-23)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
Racism -- not what the doctor ordered
Patients from minority ethnic groups in the US may be facing racist attitudes and beliefs that can unintentionally affect their treatment, a review of healthcare providers has found. (2014-05-06)
FAIR Health releases state-by-state visualizations of opioid abuse and dependence
FAIR Health has released an online interactive heat map showing new findings on opioid abuse and dependence diagnoses and procedures for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (2018-09-30)
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