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Popular Heart Transplant News and Current Events, Heart Transplant News Articles.
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Wearable defibrillators may be an alternative to surgically implanted device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders
Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. (2018-06-26)
Penn-developed approach could limit toxicity of CAR T therapy in acute myeloid leukemia
A new approach pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center may provide a new path towards treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CAR T cells. (2018-05-31)
16-year study suggests air temperature is external trigger for heart attack
A 16-year study in more than 280,000 patients has suggested that air temperature is an external trigger for heart attack. (2017-08-28)
Certain heart fat associated with higher risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women
For the first time, researchers have pinpointed a type of heart fat, linked it to a risk factor for heart disease and shown that menopausal status and estrogen levels are critical modifying factors of its associated risk in women. (2017-01-30)
Physical activity may ward off heart damage
Physical activity can lower the risk of heart damage in middle-aged and older adults and reduce the levels of heart damage in people who are obese, according to research published today in JACC: Heart Failure. (2017-04-24)
Radiotherapy for lung cancer patients is linked to increased risk of non-cancer deaths
Researchers have found that treating patients who have early stage non-small cell lung cancer with a type of radiotherapy called stereotactic body radiation therapy is associated with a small but increased risk of death from causes other than cancer. (2016-05-01)
Smoking in patients with heart attack reduced with varenicline
In patients who have had a heart attack, the drug varenicline significantly reduced smoking during the following year, found a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-26)
Heart failure after first heart attack may increase cancer risk
People who develop heart failure after their first heart attack have a greater risk of developing cancer when compared to first-time heart attack survivors without heart failure, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2016-07-11)
Younger heart attack survivors may face premature heart disease death
For patients age 50 and younger, the risk of premature death after a heart attack has dropped significantly, but their risk is still almost twice as high when compared to the general population, largely due to heart disease and other smoking-related diseases The risk of heart attack can be greatly reduced by quitting smoking, exercising and following a healthy diet. (2016-08-30)
Activated T-cells drive post-heart attack heart failure
Chronic inflammation after a heart attack can promote heart failure and death. (2017-02-27)
Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. (2017-01-25)
Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor. (2017-11-17)
Purest yet liver-like cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells
A team of researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina and elsewhere has found a better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells. (2016-08-29)
Scientists take aging cardiac stem cells out of semiretirement to improve stem cell therapy
With age, the chromosomes of our cardiac stem cells compress as they move into a state of safe, semiretirement. (2016-10-03)
1 in 4 patients develop heart failure within 4 years of first heart attack
One in four patients develop heart failure within four years of a first heart attack, according to a study in nearly 25,000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr. (2016-05-24)
Scientists developing new blood test to screen for secondary heart attack
A blood test that quickly and easily detects whether a person is at risk of a secondary heart attack is being developed by scientists at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute. (2018-09-07)
New technique improves outcome for living donor liver transplants
Thanks to a review paper done at the University of Alberta radiologists at the University of Alberta Hospital are now using CT imaging for living-donor liver transplantation. (2008-03-18)
Heart attack treatment might be in your face
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have received $2.4 million in federal funding to pursue research on a novel cell therapy that would repair heart damage using modified cells taken from the patient's own facial muscle. (2017-02-07)
First transcatheter implant for diastolic heart failure successful
Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have come up with a new device, proven safe and effective, to treat diastolic heart failure. (2017-11-15)
Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. (2018-02-05)
Impact of misunderstanding genetic tests for heart conditions
Patients who undergo genetic testing for inherited heart disease need to be better informed to know how to interpret the results and understand the impact the results will have on their life, a University of Sydney study has found. (2018-02-23)
Obesity, other risks play large role in sudden cardiac arrest among the young
Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-02-12)
Researchers reverse heart failure in Marfan mice
In experiments with mice that have a rodent form of Marfan syndrome, Johns Hopkins researchers report that even modestly increasing stress on the animals' hearts -- at levels well-tolerated in normal mice -- can initiate heart failure. (2017-11-14)
Amount or intensity? Study examines potential benefits of exercise for patients with heart failure
Physical activity can benefit patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, a common condition with no pharmacological treatment, but no clear recommendations exist on the optimal amount or intensity of physical activity for these patients. (2017-12-06)
Discovery of molecular nets inside heart muscles hold promise for new treatment
Local researchers have discovered that a group of molecules, called chondroitin sulfate, normally found only in connective tissues such as the cartilage, accumulates and causes inflammation in the hearts of patients with heart failure. (2018-01-31)
Catheter ablations reduce risks of stroke in heart patients with stroke history, study finds
Atrial fibrillation patients with a prior history of stroke who undergo catheter ablation to treat the abnormal heart rhythm lower their long-term risk of a recurrent stroke by 50 percent, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. (2016-11-13)
Mutations in bone cells can drive leukemia in neighboring stem cells
DNA mutations in bone cells that support blood development can drive leukemia formation in nearby blood stem cells. (2016-10-26)
Maternal chronic disease linked to higher rates of congenital heart disease in babies
Pregnant women with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with severe congenital heart disease and should be monitored closely in the prenatal period, according to a study published in CMAJ. (2016-10-11)
Northeastern researchers identify 36 new genes implicated in cardiac disease
A Northeastern University professor has developed a new personalized method to discover genes implicated in complex diseases. (2018-03-07)
Premature hearts less able to cope with exercise
The hearts of people born prematurely are less able to cope with the pressures of exercise in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation. (2018-03-19)
New hope for treating heart failure
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers. (2017-03-07)
Trains, planes, automobiles and heart disease
Noise may disrupt the body on the cellular level in a way that increases the risk of common heart disease risk factors, according to a review topic published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the underlying mechanisms that may lead to noise-induced heart disease. (2018-02-05)
Loosen up!
Generally, exercise is considered good for you. However, physicians and medical doctors previously prescribed bedrest to people with heart failure, fearing exercise could potentially lead to additional health problems. (2019-10-22)
Alignment of mother and offspring body clock could prevent diseases such as heart disease and obesity
The care provided by a mother can impact the body clock and health of offspring after birth, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. (2018-05-11)
Follow-up cholesterol testing reduces risk of reocurrence for heart attack and stroke patients
If you have a heart attack or stroke, it's important to get your 'bad' cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. (2017-11-12)
Heart cells sense stiffness by measuring contraction forces and resting tension simultaneously
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have identified a new mechanism in which adhesive structures within the cells of the heart sense stiffness through muscle contractions and resting tension at the same time. (2018-01-25)
Advanced therapy offers cure for relapsed cancer patient
Testicular cancer patients who do not respond to traditional therapy can be cured with high-dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant, according to an Indiana University School of Medicine study by Lawrence Einhorn, M.D.; Stephen Williams, M.D.; Rafat Abonour, M.D., and colleagues published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (2007-07-25)
Heart defects in infant may predict heart problems in birth mother later in life
Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (2018-04-02)
Scientists use gene editing to eliminate viruses in live pigs
Scientists have edited the pig genome to deactivate a family of retroviruses. (2017-08-10)
Children need conventional CPR; black and Hispanic children more likely to get Hands-Only
While compressions-only or Hands-Only CPR is as good as conventional CPR for adults, children benefit more from the conventional approach that includes rescue breaths. (2016-11-12)
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