Popular Height News and Current Events

Popular Height News and Current Events, Height News Articles.
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Behind the mask
It could be the most unexpected display of patterns since crop circles - the self-assembly of a minute array of pillars in a sheet of plastic resin. (1999-12-01)

Drip by drip
How do crystals grow? The answer given in current textbooks is: Layer by layer atoms or molecules settle on an existing crystal surface. The research team Physical Chemistry at the University of Konstanz has now observed a preliminary stage of this crystal growth in glutamic acid that contradicts this classical principal of growth. Not individual atoms settle on an existing crystal surface, but nano-drips that already contain building blocks for growth. (2017-06-21)

Low-level jets create winds of change for turbines
Global wind power capacity has increased more than fivefold over the past decade, leading to larger turbines, but low-level jets are one cause for concern. The effects of these strong, energetic wind flows depend on how high the wind flows are in relation to the turbines. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers considered three different scenarios in which the LLJs were above, below, and in the middle of the turbine rotors. (2021-02-23)

'Missing ice problem' finally solved
During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers. (2021-02-23)

School performance and body weight affects kids' self-esteem, study shows
It's well-known that within the adult population body weight and self esteem are very much inter related. But until now, the same wasn't known about children's healthy body weight and its relationship with a positive self-image. (2009-01-20)

Infants understand that more desirable rewards require more effort
Infants who observe someone putting more effort into attaining a goal attribute more value to it, a new study finds. (2017-11-23)

Obesity on the rise in Indonesia
Obesity is on the rise in Indonesia, one of the largest studies of the double burden of malnutrition in children has revealed. (2016-05-12)

The human race has peaked
Newly emerging trends in data suggests humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. These biological limitations may be affected by anthropogenic impacts on the environment - including climate change - which could have a deleterious effect on these limits. This review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while considering the effects of both genetic and environmental parameters. (2017-12-06)

Biodiversity is 3-D
The species-area relationship (SAC) is a long-time considered pattern in ecology and is discussed in most of academic Ecology books. Its implications are relevant for many ecological, evolutionary, conservation and biogeographic purposes. Conversely, the associated volume-species relation has been almost ignored. (2017-06-09)

To maximize sugarcane harvesting, use the right blade
You wouldn't use the same knife to cut through a thick steak as you would to slice an angel food cake, right? Although that may be a ridiculous comparison, the same principle holds true when harvesting various crops. One blade doesn't slice all. Researchers at the University of Illinois tested four blades to find the one that most efficiently cuts sugarcane. (2018-01-17)

People born premature have smaller airways causing respiratory problems
People born prematurely may have smaller airways than those born at full term, which can cause respiratory problems. That's according to research published in Experimental Physiology today. (2017-11-29)

New study reveals strong El Niño events cause large changes in Antarctic ice shelves
A new study reveals that strong El Nino events can cause significant ice loss in some Antarctic ice shelves while the opposite may occur during strong La Nina events. (2018-01-08)

May the forest be with you: GEDI moves toward launch to space station
GEDI (pronounced like 'Jedi,' of Star Wars fame) is a first-of-its-kind laser instrument designed to map the world's forests in 3-D from space. These measurements will help fill in critical gaps in scientists' understanding of how much carbon is stored in the world's forests, the potential for ecosystems to absorb rising concentrations of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere, and the impact of forest changes on biodiversity. (2018-05-04)

Kids persistently allergic to cow's milk are smaller than peers with nut allergies
Children who experience persistent allergies to cow's milk may remain shorter and lighter throughout pre-adolescence when compared with children who are allergic to peanuts or tree nuts, according to a retrospective chart review. (2018-03-03)

VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration
Study shows that reefs built to reach a foot or more above the bottom develop into healthy, self-sustaining ecosystems, while those rebuilt at lower heights are quickly buried by sediment. (2017-11-13)

Low fitness is associated with larger waist size and higher degree of inflammation
Low fitness is associated with a larger waist size and a higher degree of inflammation, according to a study published Jan. 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Anne-Sophie Wedell-Neergaard from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues. (2018-01-17)

Feeling anxious? Blame the size of your waistline!
Anxiety is one of the most common mental health disorders, and it's more likely to affect women, especially middle-aged women. Although anxiety can be caused by many factors, a new study suggests that the amount of abdominal fat a woman has could increase her chances of developing anxiety. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2018-03-07)

'Corrective glass' for mass spectrometry imaging
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now improved mass spectrometry imaging in such a way that the distribution of molecules can also be visualized on rippled, hairy, bulgy or coarse surfaces. The source of the laser-based technique was custom-built to accommodate the topography of non-flat samples. The new tool can be used for answering ecological questions from a new perspective. (2017-02-08)

More woodland management needed to help save dormice
Managing woodlands to a greater extent could help stop the decline of Britain's dormice, new research suggests. (2018-06-26)

Rice plants evolve to adapt to flooding
Although water is essential for plant growth, excessive amounts can waterlog and kill a plant. In South and Southeast Asia, where periodic flooding occurs during the rainy season, the water depth can reach several meters for many months. (2018-07-12)

Redefining obesity in postmenopausal women
There is no doubt the prevalence of obesity has increased significantly across all age groups, creating greater health risks. What exactly constitutes obesity, however, is subject to debate, especially for postmenopausal women who have a different body composition than younger women. A study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), demonstrates that the long-accepted BMI definition for obesity may no longer be accurate. (2017-11-16)

Short kids may have higher future stroke risk
Being a short kid is associated with increased risk of having a stroke in adulthood, according to Danish research published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal. (2018-02-15)

A fat belly is bad for your heart
Belly fat, even in people who are not otherwise overweight, is bad for the heart, according to results from the Mayo Clinic presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. (2018-04-20)

Plant fossils provide new insight into the uplift history of SE Tibet
Plenty of well-preserved plant fossils with well constrained geological ages were discovered from Markam Basin in SE Tibetan Plateau. Fossils from different layers are different in floristic components and leaf sizes, they evidenced the uplift to present elevation during the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (33.9 Ma). Moreover, these fossils suggest that the modernization of highly diverse Asian biota nowadays took place before the E-O transition, not Neogene as previous thought. (2018-06-29)

Children gain more weight when parents see them as 'overweight'
Children whose parents considered them to be 'overweight' tended to gain more weight over the following decade compared with children whose parents thought they were a 'normal' weight, according to analyses of data from two nationally representative studies. The findings indicate that children whose parents identified them as being overweight perceived their own body size more negatively and were more likely to attempt to lose weight, factors that partly accounted for their weight gain. (2017-01-13)

Molecular scaffolding aids construction at the nanoscale
Researchers at OIST have made a nanoscale construction kit comprised of molecular 'bricks' and 'scaffolding,' inspired by the way the extracellular matrix is built around living cells. (2018-04-18)

Florida's obesity rate may be higher than originally thought, new study finds
Florida's obesity rate may be higher than originally thought. A widely used national health survey puts the overall obesity rate in the state at 27.8 percent, but a new study based on an analysis of a robust clinical data repository shows a rate of 37.1 percent -- nearly 10 percentage points higher. (2018-06-15)

Study: Strenuous exercise in adolescence may ward off height loss later in life
A new study has identified several key factors in postmenopausal women that are associated with height loss, a common occurrence in this age group that is known to increase the risk for death and disease. (2018-05-23)

One in 5 parents did not talk to kids about what to do if they got lost at an amusement park
New report indicates several opportunities to reduce safety risks for children in the amusement park environment. (2018-06-18)

The power of multiples: Connecting wind farms can make a more reliable - and cheaper - power source
Wind power, long considered to be as fickle as wind itself, can be groomed to become a steady, dependable source of electricity and delivered at a lower cost than at present, according to scientists at Stanford University. The key is connecting wind farms throughout a given geographic area with transmission lines, thus combining the electric outputs of the farms into one powerful energy source. The findings are published in the November issue of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. (2007-11-21)

Genetic engineering mechanism visualized
Researchers at Kanazawa University and the University of Tokyo report in Nature Communications the visualization of the dynamics of 'molecular scissors' -- the main mechanism of the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic-engineering technique. (2017-11-13)

Lung function decline accelerates in menopausal women
Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2016-12-02)

Bungee jumping for science
Immediately before a person decides to launch themselves off a bridge for a bungee jump, there is a measurable increase in their brain activity. This can be recorded nearly one second before the person makes the conscious decision to jump. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring this 'Bereitschaftspotential' (readiness potential) outside a laboratory and under extreme conditions. Results from this research have been published in Scientific Reports*. (2019-02-28)

Malnutrition, anemia among Rohingya children in Bangladesh refugee camp
The pervasiveness of malnutrition and anemia among Rohingya children in a refugee camp in Bangladesh exceeds emergency thresholds. (2018-04-10)

Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.
George Mason University researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine. (2018-03-12)

Livestock grazing management compatible with nesting greater sage-grouse
A new study published in the Journal of Wildlife Management looks at whether management of livestock grazing may help protect sagebrush and birds that depend on it. (2017-10-12)

Evaluating surgeon gowning steps for optimal sterile operating room techniques
For surgeons getting ready to enter the operating room (OR), the chances of contamination may be lower if they put their gowns on by themselves -- without the assistance of a surgical technician, according to an experimental study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2019-01-04)

Winter wave heights and extreme storms on the rise in Western Europe
Study reveals average winter wave heights along the Atlantic coast of Western Europe have been rising for almost seven decades. (2018-04-24)

Study explains why tall individuals are more prone to cancer
For most cancers, risk increases dramatically with age. But what about the effect of having more cells in the body? Might taller people be more prone to cancer because they have more cells? Yes, according to Leonard Nunney, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Riverside, who examined data from four large-scale surveillance projects on 23 cancer categories. (2018-10-26)

Excess body weight before 50 is associated with higher risk of dying from pancreatic cancer
Excess weight before age 50 may be more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality risk than excess weight at older ages, according to results of a study presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-03-31)

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