Popular Herbicides News and Current Events

Popular Herbicides News and Current Events, Herbicides News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 9 | 359 Results
How does the environment affect obesity?
Researchers will be examining how agricultural and food processing practices may affect brown fat activity directly or indirectly. Research will look at how toxicants such as pesticides or herbicides and artificial sweeteners or high fructose corn syrups could alter brown fat (BAT). (2016-05-02)

Researchers find cereal rye is effective at reducing Amaranthus spp. density in soybean crops
Fall-planted cover crops are often used as part of an integrated weed control program in herbicide-resistant soybean crops. But researchers writing in the journal Weed Technology say not all cover crops are equally effective against Palmer amaranth, waterhemp and other Amaranthus spp. weeds. (2017-09-15)

Robotic weeders: to a farm near you?
The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. Specialty crops such as lettuce, broccoli, tomatoes, and onions may be the first to benefit. (2018-01-10)

As climate is warming up, more bird nests are destroyed in Finnish farmland
A new study shows that birds have shifted the time of their breeding much faster than the farmers are anticipating their sowing times in Finnish farmland. This means that more birds are nowadays laying their eggs on fields that are still to be sown, a mismatch in timing that is most likely fatal for the bird nests. (2018-01-11)

Early-killed rye shows promise in edamame
With the rise of herbicide-resistant weeds in most grain and vegetable crops, farmers are looking for alternatives to herbicides to control weeds. Cover crops offer one potential weed management tool. Their use in specialty crops is limited, and no testing has been done so far in edamame. However, a new University of Illinois study reports that early-killed cereal rye shows promise for edamame growers. (2018-03-08)

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (2018-06-04)

Disease diagnosis in just 15 minutes
Testing for diseases such as cancer and multiple sclerosis could soon be as simple as using a pregnancy testing kit. A team led by scientists at the University of Leeds has developed a biosensor technology that uses antibodies to detect biomarkers - molecules in the human body which are often a marker for disease -- much faster than current testing methods. (2008-10-01)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

New complex reacting with nitrile: A key to enable down-regulation of cancer enzymes
Korean researchers succeeded to synthesize biomimetic material reacting with nitrile. It is expected to develop prodrugs that inhibit specific enzymes in cancer cells. (2017-09-29)

Weeds out of control
Herbicides can no longer control the weeds that threaten crop productivity and food security in the UK because the plants have evolved resistance, and future control must depend on management strategies that reduce reliance on chemicals. So concludes a nationwide epidemiological assessment of the factors that are driving the abundance and spread of the major agricultural weed, black-grass. (2018-02-12)

Two new mechanisms for herbicide resistance found in Palmer amaranth
Palmer amaranth is a nightmare of a weed, causing yield losses up to 80 percent in severely infested soybean fields. It scoffs at farmers' attempts at control, having evolved resistance to six classes of herbicides since its discovery in the United States 100 years ago. And now, scientists have discovered it has two new tricks up its sleeve. (2017-04-04)

New study shows invasive Chinese privet can be well controlled with lower concentrations of herbicide
Chinese privet is one of the most invasive shrubs in the southeastern United States -- frequently growing in dense thickets along roadsides, on rights of way and in forests. Now the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management has good news for land managers battling the shrub. Researchers say you can achieve great control with much less herbicide than typically used. (2018-04-10)

Are humans causing cancer in wild animals?
As humans, we know that some of our activities can cause cancer to develop in our bodies. Smoking, poor diets, pollution, chemicals used as additives in food and personal hygiene products, and even too much sun can contribute to an increased risk of cancer. But, are human activities also causing cancer in wild animals? Researchers from ASU's School of Life Sciences think so and are urgently calling for research into this topic. (2018-05-21)

A less hazardous means to create phosphorus compounds
Scientists have identified a precursor that helps convert phosphorus into a range of useful compounds, all the while bypassing the need for hazardous intermediate substances that have been conventionally required for such reactions. (2018-02-08)

Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seem
This is the first comprehensive review of gaps in risk assessments for adjuvants in pesticide formulations which are not currently subject to safety assessments. Ignoring the potential dangers of other ingredients in commonly used commercial pesticides leads to inaccuracies in the safety profile of the pesticide solution, as well as confusion in scientific literature on pesticide effects. The review suggests that new regulations are needed to protect people and the environment from toxic pesticide ingredients. (2018-03-08)

Researchers recommend new herbicide registration for weed control in watermelon crops
Research featured in the latest edition of the journal Weed Technology recommends that the herbicide bicyclopyrone, now used in corn, be registered for weed management in watermelon crops as well. (2018-08-29)

Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrient
A newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study. The new system applies phosphite to cotton crops engineered to express a certain gene -- a gene that makes cotton able to process the phosphite into nutrition while the same compound suppresses weeds that are unable to use it, researchers said. (2018-06-04)

Research uncovers new weed control options for strawberry growers
Since the 2005 ban of methyl bromide by federal regulators, winter strawberry growers have had limited options for managing broadleaf weeds, grasses and nutsedge species. But new research featured in the journal Weed Technology shows drip-applied herbicides may help to fill the gap. (2017-11-30)

Newly identified rice gene confers multiple-herbicide resistance
A rice gene that renders the crop resistant to several widely used beta-triketone herbicides has been identified, researchers report, revealing the genetic cause of herbicide susceptibility that has been identified in some important rice varieties. (2019-07-25)

UC researchers identify nontraditional sites for future solar farms
In a study published today in Environmental Science and Technology, researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of California, Davis, explored the possibility of developing solar installations on a variety of unconventional sites in California's Central Valley. (2017-12-19)

Scientists identify factors which drive the evolution of herbicide resistance
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have identified factors which are driving the evolution of herbicide resistance in crops -- something which could also have an impact on medicine as well as agriculture. (2018-02-13)

Montana State researchers find that beetle odor could help tackle tamarisk
The Montana State University team found that a synthetic version of a pheromone produced by northern tamarisk beetles could be used to double the effectiveness of the beetles in controlling the invasive shrub. (2018-03-27)

Pest control: Wicked weeds may be agricultural angels
Farmers looking to reduce reliance on pesticides, herbicides and other pest management tools may want to heed the advice of Cornell agricultural scientists: Let nature be nature -- to a degree. (2016-11-11)

Common weed killer linked to bee deaths
Honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. Scientists believe this is evidence that glyphosate might be contributing to the decline of honey bees and native bees around the world. (2018-09-24)

Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that, on average, human disturbances don't appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available. (2018-10-12)

Vietnam veterans and agent orange exposure -- new report
The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War found sufficient evidence of an association for hypertension and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018), focused on the scientific literature published between Sept. 30, 2014, and Dec. 31, 2017. (2018-11-15)

Impact of weather and well-timed cultural management techniques on organic weed control
Weed management can be a tough challenge in organic cropping systems since growers don't have herbicides in their weed control arsenal. New research published in the journal Weed Science, though, shows that weather conditions and well-timed cultural management techniques can help fill the void by making crops more competitive. (2018-05-15)

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide
A team of UCLA engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer. This finding could lead to the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years, an important outcome as weeds continue to develop resistance to current herbicide regimens. (2018-07-13)

Research associates some pesticides with respiratory wheeze in farmers
New research from North Carolina State University connects several pesticides commonly used by farmers with both allergic and non-allergic wheeze, which can be a sensitive marker for early airway problems. (2016-08-03)

What happens if we run out?
What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution. (2018-05-17)

Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to 4 herbicide sites of action
When a waterhemp biotype in eastern Nebraska survived a post-emergent application of the PPO inhibitor fomesafen, a team of university scientists decided to take a close look. They discovered the population was resistant to four distinct herbicide sites of action, including PPO inhibitors, ALS inhibitors, EPSPS inhibitors and PS II inhibitors. (2019-09-13)

Climate change imperils Midwest ag production
A new Cornell University-led study shows that Midwest agriculture is increasingly vulnerable to climate change because of the region's reliance on growing rain-fed crops. (2018-12-12)

'Lazy lawn mowers' can help support suburban bee populations and diversity
Homeowners concerned about the decline of bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects need look no further than their own back yards, says ecologist Susannah Lerman at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the USDA Forest Service. In new research, she and colleagues suggest that homeowners can help support bee habitat in suburban yards, specifically their lawns, by changing lawn-mowing habits. (2018-03-14)

Natural plant defense genes provide clues to safener protection in grain sorghum
Weeds often emerge at the same time as vulnerable crop seedlings and sneak between plants as crops grow. How do farmers kill them without harming the crops themselves? In a new University of Illinois study, researchers identify genes and metabolic pathways responsible for safener efficacy in grain sorghum. (2019-03-21)

Scientists to create new 'chemical noses' to rid the environment of industrial pollutants
Scientists from five European countries have joined forces to develop next-generation 'chemical noses' to remove industrial pollutants from the environment. The European Commission allocated 2.9 million euros to finance the Horizon 2020 FET-OPEN project INITIO that will bring together researchers from TalTech and five other universities as well as experts from an Interspectrum OÜ operating in Estonia and an Italian company in an international research project. (2019-02-06)

Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia. Unfortunately, though, land managers trying to control the weed often experience mixed results. (2019-12-11)

Atrazine alternatives in sweet corn
Atrazine has been very good at killing weeds in corn fields for more than 50 years. But some of the properties that make it a successful herbicide, such as its persistence in the soil and ability to be transported in water, also lead to concerns about potential environmental impact. At both federal and state levels, increasing restrictions on atrazine use has the sweet corn industry wondering about alternatives. (2016-07-19)

How plants harness microbes to get nutrients
A Rutgers-led team has discovered how plants harness microbes in soil to get nutrients, a process that could be exploited to boost crop growth, fight weeds and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides. (2018-09-17)

Studies show the influence of environment on the evolution of weeds
Rapid increases in herbicide resistance show that weeds can undergo important genetic changes over very brief periods of time. But herbicide use isn't the only factor influencing the evolution of weeds. (2019-07-22)

Study finds increase of herbicide in older adults
Among a sample of older adults living in Southern California, average urine levels of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite increased between 1993 and 2016, as did the proportion of samples with detectable levels, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-10-24)

Page 1 of 9 | 359 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.