Popular Herpes News and Current Events

Popular Herpes News and Current Events, Herpes News Articles.
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New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment. (2018-10-05)

Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detector
Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections. The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are sometimes not readily available. (2018-04-24)

Study shows suppressing herpes virus may reduce infectiousness of HIV
A recent study of men co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and HIV revealed that drugs used to suppress HSV decrease the levels of HIV in the blood and rectal secretions, which may make patients less likely to transmit the virus. This study is published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases, now available online. (2007-11-15)

Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
New research from Dr. Luis M. Schang and his group at the Baker Institute for Animal Health has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection. (2019-11-14)

Mutation explains why some people are more vulnerable to viral brain infection
Scientists identified mutations in a single gene that impair immunity to viruses in a region of the brain called the brain stem. (2018-02-22)

UCLA study describes structure of herpes virus linked to Kaposi's sarcoma
UCLA team shows in the laboratory that an inhibitor can be developed to break down the herpes virus. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, or KSHV, is one of two viruses known to cause cancer in humans. (2018-01-19)

Oral vitamin D may help prevent some skin infections
A study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that use of oral vitamin D supplements bolsters production of a protective chemical normally found in the skin, and may help prevent skin infections that are a common result of atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema. (2008-10-06)

Chicken pox vaccine linked with shingles at the vaccination site in some children
New research in Pediatric Dermatology reports several cases of shingles that developed at the original vaccination site in healthy children after they were immunized against chicken pox. (2018-02-09)

UT Houston dermatologists link family history to shingles susceptibility
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston have identified family history as one reason why some people might be more susceptible to shingles, a severe skin condition. (2008-05-19)

What are trends in emergency department utilization, costs for shingles?
A new article published by JAMA Dermatology uses a nationwide database of emergency department (ED) visits to examine herpes zoster (HZ, shingles)-related ED utilization and costs. (2017-06-21)

Painful intercourse in women improved with fibromyalgia drug
Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with an oral nerve pain medication used to treat pain caused by a previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-01-02)

Viral hideout
The ability of the 'cold sore' herpes simplex virus to establish quiet infections and reawaken periodically has long mystified scientists. A new study in mice reveals that a key host protein acts as a critical regulator of the virus's sleep-wake cycle. (2018-03-15)

Rockefeller scientist to speak at AAAS on infections as genetic disorders
Rockefeller University's Jean-Laurent Casanova is to present evidence that infectious diseases in the general population are frequently genetic disorders. (2010-02-17)

The Australian government's plan for the biocontrol of the common carp presents several risks
Belgian, English and Australian scientists are calling on the Australian authorities to review their decision to introduce the carp herpes virus as a way to combat the common carp having colonised the country's rivers. In a letter published in the journal Science, they not only believe that this measure will be ineffective but that it also represents a risk to ecosystems. (2018-02-22)

Preclinical study: Probiotic-derived molecule may suppress fatal brain inflammation
The existence of certain microorganisms in your gut may bolster the immune system's ability to fend off a herpes viral attack that can cause fatal brain inflammation. Researchers say the findings are the first to suggest that an envelope molecule from a bacterium called Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis) might be useful against viral inflammatory diseases. Called capsular polysaccharide A (PSA), the envelope molecule appears to promote protective, anti-inflammatory responses during a viral infection. (2019-05-14)

A mother lode of protection
Now research conducted in mice offers new hope that neonatal herpes infections might eventually be avoidable by stimulating an immune response in mothers. (2019-04-18)

Specialized white blood cells coordinate first responders to viral infection
Regulatory T cells are thought to call a halt to immune reponses as the fight against infection draws to a close. Researchers have evidence that these cells also help coordinate the early stages of the fight against viral infections. (2008-04-24)

Meet the hominin species that gave us genital herpes
New research uses innovative data modeling to predict which species acted as an intermediary between our ancestors and those of chimpanzees to carry HSV2 -- the genital herpes virus -- across the species barrier. (2017-10-01)

Serum prevents deadly cytomegalovirus infection after stem cell transplantation
In a mouse model, researchers have identified a potential pathway towards creating effective treatments for Cytomegalovirus, a common, yet potentially lethal viral infection for stem cell transplant patients. (2019-01-17)

Identifying underlying causes of immune deficiencies that increase shingles risk
Varicella zoster virus can remain dormant for decades and reactivate to cause shingles. Shingles occurs at a higher rate in immunocompromised individuals. A study published this week in the JCI provides insights into a metabolic mechanism for immune deficiencies that permit reactivation of long-latent viruses. These findings are a step toward new strategies to improve preventative treatments for shingles and other infections in high-risk populations. (2017-06-12)

Chimera viruses can help the fight against lymphomas
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have created a chimera virus that allows the study of molecules to treat cancers caused by human herpes virus infection in mice models of disease. (2017-09-14)

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy. (2020-02-04)

Cancer patients face higher risk for shingles, new vaccines hold promise for prevention
People newly diagnosed with cancer, particularly blood cancers, and those treated with chemotherapy have a greater risk of developing shingles, according to a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings may help guide efforts to prevent the often painful skin condition in cancer patients through the use of new vaccines. (2018-12-13)

New research reviews the state of vaccine safety science
A new systematic review provides a succinct summary of the scientific evidence for and/or against causal associations for 47 adverse events following immunization (AEFI). Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2019 Meeting. (2019-04-27)

Keeping herpes infection in check: Pitt researchers describe immune system strategies
Herpes simplex virus type I can cause bouts of cold sores, blindness and potentially lethal encephalitis when it reawakens from a quiescent state in the nerve cells it infects. To prevent these consequences, the stealthy virus is kept under constant guard by the immune system, say University of Pittsburgh scientists. Their research challenges the once common notion that latent HSV-1 in sensory neurons is invisible to the immune system. (2008-10-09)

Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNA
A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses. In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University's Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species. (2017-08-04)

Vaccine shows promise against herpes virus
A genetically edited form of a herpes simplex virus has outperformed a leading vaccine candidate in a new study published in Nature Vaccines. When challenged with a virulent strain of the sexually transmitted HSV-2, vaccinated guinea pigs displayed fewer genital lesions, less viral replication and less of the viral shedding that most readily spreads infection. (2020-11-06)

Clinical advances in systemic lupus erythematosus
The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate exciting advances for individuals suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The first is a phase II clinical study of a promising oral treatment, baricitinib. The second demonstrates the effective use of shingles vaccine in SLE patients who are particularly prone to this infection. (2018-06-14)

A new class of drug to treat herpes simplex virus-1 infection
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have now identified a small drug molecule that can clear the HSV-1 infection in the cells of the cornea -- the clear outer layer of the eyeball -- and works completely differently than the currently-available drugs, making it a promising potential option for patients who have developed resistance. (2018-02-14)

Potential new herpes therapy studied
University of Florida Genetics Institute researchers are trying to employ a specially designed RNA enzyme to inhibit strains of the herpes simplex virus. The enzyme disables a gene responsible for producing a protein involved in the maturation and release of viral particles in an infected cell. The technique appears to be effective in experiments with mice and rabbits. (2009-02-03)

Female sex hormones play a vital role in defense against sexually transmitted diseases
Charu Kaushic, assistant professor and supervisor of the studies, says the implication of this work is quite significant. (2005-02-18)

Mayo Clinic researchers clarify how cells defend themselves from viruses
A protein known to help cells defend against infection also regulates the form and function of mitochondria, according to a new paper in Nature Communications. The protein, one of a group called myxovirus-resistance (Mx) proteins, help cells fight infections without the use of systemic antibodies or white blood cells. (2020-03-03)

Geometry goes viral: Researchers use maths to solve virus puzzle
A discovery, by researchers at the University of York (UK) and San Diego State University (US), paves the way for new insights into how viruses form, evolve and infect their hosts and may eventually open up new avenues in anti-viral therapy. (2019-09-27)

Brainy new approaches to autism, chronic pain, concussion and more
Technological advances have ushered in a new era of discovery in neuroscience. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature an array of research findings on the brain and nervous system. The studies shed new light on the intricate circuitry behind our thought processes, feelings and behaviors and offer leads for both high-tech and low-tech treatment approaches. (2018-04-22)

Scientists find a new way to attack herpesviruses
A team of scientists led by Leor S. Weinberger, PhD, the William and Ute Bowes Distinguished Professor and director of the Gladstone-UCSF Center for Cell Circuitry, uncovered the mechanism that allows cytomegalovirus to replicate. Their study, published in the scientific journal PNAS, could open new therapeutic avenues to treat several herpesviruses. (2018-08-28)

Studies reveal how shingles vaccine should be used in arthritis patients
New research indicates that the live varicella-zoster vaccine -- which is given to protect against shingles -- elicits robust immune responses in patients when administered several weeks prior to the start of treatment with the arthritis drug tofacitinib. (2017-08-28)

Scientists reveal cryo-electron microscopy structure of a herpesvirus capsid at 3.1 Å
Using a combination of 'block-based' reconstruction and accurate Ewald sphere corrections, the researchers at the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with coworkers reconstructed the 3.1 Å structure of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) B-capsid and built the atomic model, thus expanding the understanding of the assembly mechanism of the capsid. (2018-04-05)

Oyster farming to benefit from new genetic screening tool
Oyster farmers are set to benefit from a new genetic tool that will help to prevent disease outbreaks and improve yields. The technology -- developed by scientists at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute -- will enable hatcheries to rapidly assess the genetic make-up of their oysters, so they can select animals with desirable characteristics from which to breed. (2017-05-23)

Study: Topical antibiotic triggers unexpected antiviral response
A Yale-led research team made a startling discovery while investigating the effect of bacteria on viral infections. When they applied a common topical antibiotic to mice before or shortly after infection with herpes and other viruses, they found that the antibiotic triggered an antiviral resistance in the animals, the researchers said. (2018-04-09)

Link between common 'harmless' virus and cardiovascular damage
Researchers from Brighton and Sussex Medical School have found an unexpectedly close link between a herpes virus and the occurrence of immune cells damaging cardiovascular tissue. (2018-08-13)

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