Popular Hii Regions News and Current Events

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NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflake
NASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. Developed by scientist Jussi Leinonen of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow -- the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs -- and could be a step toward improving predictions of this hazard. (2018-03-29)

Map of teenage brain provides evidence of link between antisocial behavior and brain development
The brains of teenagers with serious antisocial behavior problems differ significantly in structure to those of their peers, providing the clearest evidence to date that their behavior stems from changes in brain development in early life, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge and the University of Southampton, in collaboration with the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy. (2016-06-15)

Autism often associated with multiple new mutations
Most autism cases are in families with no previous history of the disorder. New mutations, that occur in offspring but not in their parents, might play a role. These mutations have now been found, not just in protein-coding genome areas, but also in regulatory regions. Many are in areas that influence gene activity in the brain's striatum, which coordinates motivation, planning and other aspects of cognition. (2017-10-12)

Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity
A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics. (2019-06-28)

Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate change 
New research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds -- both warm-blooded animals -- may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians. (2018-01-29)

Galaxies that feed on other galaxies
An international team of astronomers led by Giuseppina Battaglia, researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), finds signs that the outer halo of the Milky Way contains stellar remains of massive dwarf galaxies that were devoured by our own. (2018-01-31)

The brains of children with a better physical fitness possess a greater volume of gray matter
Researchers from the University of Granada lead a worldwide pioneering study that confirms that physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance. (2017-11-22)

Understanding brain activity when you name what you see
Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it. (2019-06-24)

Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new research
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. A new study, carried out in the Department of Plant Sciences, together with international colleagues, has shown for the first time that DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR), which corrects mutations that arise during the replication of the genome during cell division, is targeted to particular regions of the genome, and preferentially repairs genes. (2018-01-05)

How does living in a big city increase life expectancy?
Inhabitants of Moscow and St Petersburg live significantly longer than people living in other regions of Russia, according to a recent study carried out by researchers at the Higher School of Economics. (2018-01-30)

A new study indicates the possibility to monitor the progression of Alzheimer's Disease by monitoring major brain antioxidant levels using noninvasive techniques
In a breakthrough human study, anti-oxidant, glutathione (GSH), which protects the brain from stress, has been found to be significantly depleted in Alzheimer's patients compared to normal subjects. As GSH is a very important anti-oxidant that protects the brain from free radicals, the findings give us another measure to use when diagnosing potential for the advancement of Alzheimer's disease or recognizing those that are in the throes of Alzheimer's advancement. (2018-10-12)

Poor rural population had best diet and health in mid-Victorian years
Poor, rural societies retaining a more traditional lifestyle where high-quality foods were obtained locally enjoyed the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain. A new study, published in JRSM Open, examined the impact of regional diets on the health of the poor during mid-19th century Britain and compared it with mortality data over the same period. (2018-03-08)

Lifestyle changes can close regional obesity gap, study finds
Lifestyle differences are to blame for regional variation in obesity rates in Scotland, research from the University of Edinburgh has found. Genetic factors cannot completely explain why obesity is more common in some areas and not others, scientists say. (2017-10-06)

Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need
New research suggests that geographical mismatches between conservation needs and expertise may hinder global conservation goals. (2017-08-30)

Selection and reselection processes of executive political positions are gender biased
Although male over-representation in politics is a worldwide phenomenon, the executive is the most male-dominated branch. There have been very few women presidents and prime ministers. The figure has stagnated since 1990 at twenty female national leaders per year. In recent years their presence has even decreased: in December 2017 there were only thirteen female leaders of their respective country. (2019-01-11)

Researchers reveal when global warming first appeared
Human caused climate change is increasingly apparent today through multiple lines of evidence. But now researchers have revealed for the first time when and where the first clear signs of global warming appeared in the temperature record and where those signals are likely to manifest in extreme rainfall events in the very near future. (2015-09-22)

New study advances treatment options for PTSD
Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-11)

Microphysical differences in precipitation between Tibet and southern China
Studies of raindrop size distribution (DSD) over different regions helps to advance our understanding of DSD characteristics and provide observational facts regarding the development and evaluation of microphysical parameterization schemes in numerical models over different regions in the future. The raindrop number concentration for convective precipitation over Tibet is much lower than that in southern China; and for larger raindrops, the condition is similar for stratiform precipitation. The rainfall rate over Tibet, with the same radar reflectivity, is much heavier than that over southern China. (2017-05-02)

Comparison of primate brains hints at what makes us human
A detailed comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee and macaque brains reveals elements that make the human brain unique, including cortical circuits underlying production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-11-23)

Loss of work productivity in a warming world
Heat stress affects the health of workers and reduces the work productivity by changing the ambient working environment thus leading to economic losses. Scientists identified the regions of vulnerability to heat waves that might have been overlooked in the past. (2018-10-26)

Predicting poverty by satellite with detailed accuracy
By combining satellite data and sophisticated machine learning, researchers have developed a technique to estimate household consumption and income. (2016-08-18)

Small but distinct differences among species mark evolution of human brain
The most dramatic divergence between humans and other primates can be found in the brain, the primary organ that gives our species its identity. However, all regions of the human brain have molecular signatures very similar to those of our primate relatives, yet some regions contain distinctly human patterns of gene activity that mark the brain's evolution and may contribute to our cognitive abilities, a new Yale-led study has found. (2017-11-23)

Zika antibodies from infected patient thwart infection in mice
Researchers have identified neutralizing antibodies against Zika virus from an infected patient that fully protected mice from infection, adding to the current arsenal of antibodies in development for much needed antiviral therapies and vaccines. (2016-12-14)

Tiny microenvironments in the ocean hold clues to global nitrogen cycle
A new University of Rochester study shows that nitrogen-feeding organisms exist all over the deep ocean, and not just in large oxygen-depleted (2018-04-20)

Even the tiniest aerosol particles can kick up a storm
A new study suggests that tiny aerosol particles from pollution plumes have a greater influence on stormy weather over pristine regions of the world, such as oceans and large forests, than previously believed. (2018-01-25)

Reading between the genes
For a long time dismissed as 'junk DNA,' we now know that also the regions between the genes fulfill vital functions. Scientists around Julien Gagneur, Professor for Computational Biology at the Technical University of Munich and Professor Patrick Cramer at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen have now developed a method to find regulatory DNA regions which are active and controlling genes. (2016-06-02)

'Social brain' networks are altered at a young age in autism
As infants develop, they respond to social cues such as voices, faces and gestures. Their brain develops a network of regions that specialise in translating these cues, the 'social brain'. A common observation in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders is reduced sensitivity towards these social cues. A team of researchers from the University of Geneva brings evidence of how this phenomenon hinders the normal development of the social brain at early developmental stages. (2018-02-27)

Red Sea gene pool follows water flow
Satellite imagery shows how currents shape the Red Sea ecosystem. (2017-10-03)

Search for the 'on' switches may reveal genetic role in development and disease
A new resource that identifies regions of the human genome that regulate gene expression may help scientists learn about and develop treatments for a number of human diseases, according to researchers at Duke's Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy. (2008-01-24)

Natural gas prices, not 'war on coal,' were key to coal power decline
Steep declines in the use of coal for power generation over the past decade were caused largely by less expensive natural gas and the availability of wind energy -- not by environmental regulations. (2018-05-03)

Mixing and matching yeast DNA
Osaka University scientists show molecular factors that determine why some regions in yeast chromosomes are apt for remodeling, while other regions stay faithful during cell replication. (2017-09-11)

Little wasp bodies means little wasp brain regions, study shows
A Drexel study looking at 19 species of paper wasps found that body size may lead to variation in the complex parts of their brains. (2018-01-03)

Global warming will accelerate water cycle over global land monsoon regions
A new study provides a broader understanding on the redistribution of freshwater resources across the globe induced by future changes in the monsoon system. (2019-07-23)

How education may stave off cognitive decline
Prefrontal brain regions linked to higher educational attainment are characterized by increased expression of genes involved in neurotransmission and immunity, finds a study of healthy older adults published in JNeurosci. The identified genes and molecular pathways could provide insight into factors that help keep the brain sharp in old age. (2019-04-08)

A changing climate, changing wine
A new Harvard study suggests that, though vineyards might be able to counteract some of the effects of climate change by planting lesser-known grape varieties, scientists and vintners need to better understand the wide diversity of grapes and their adaptions to different climates. (2018-01-02)

Video games can change your brain
Scientists have collected and summarized studies looking at how video games can shape our brains and behavior. Research to date suggests that playing video games can change the brain regions responsible for attention and visuospatial skills and make them more efficient. The researchers also looked at studies exploring brain regions associated with the reward system, and how these are related to video game addiction. (2017-06-22)

NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission locates elusive electron act
New NASA research helps improve our understanding of how electrons move through the complex region around Earth -- information that will help untangle how such particle acrobatics affect the planet. (2018-01-03)

Thawing permafrost likely to boost global warming
A new assessment more than doubles previous estimates of the amount of carbon stored in permafrost, and indicates that carbon dioxide emissions from microbial decomposition of organic carbon in thawing permafrost could amount to roughly half those resulting from global land-use change during this century. (2008-09-01)

Comparing different information levels (U. Saint-Mont)
In the present paper, the concept of 'situation' translates into one of a 'stochastic environment', and three levels of information are systematically studied (minimum, sequential, maximum). (2017-10-03)

NASA sees strong storms in Tropical Depression 05W as it strengthened
Tropical Depression 05W briefly reached tropical storm status overnight on June 5 into June 6, and then weakened back to a depression at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). Once 05W reached tropical storm status it was named 'Ewiniar.' NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery that provided clues that the storm would strengthen. (2018-06-06)

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