Popular Honeybees News and Current Events

Popular Honeybees News and Current Events, Honeybees News Articles.
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Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. (2019-09-10)

How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain
Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain. In a new study, researchers found that the stingers of the two species are about five times softer at the tip than at the base to make it easier to pierce skin. The stingers are harder closer to the insect's body so they don't bend too much, or break, as you yelp in agony. (2018-10-08)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity. AAAS annual meeting presentation by systems researcher Craig Tovey. (2018-02-18)

Common pesticides kill amphibian parasites, study finds
A recent study by Jessica Hua, assistant professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and colleagues, explored the effects of six commonly used pesticides on two different populations of a widespread parasite of amphibians. They found that a broad range of insecticides commonly used in the US kill amphibian parasites, which could potentially decrease the number of parasites that amphibians must defend against. For the pyrethroid and neonicotinoid pesticides tested in this study, this pattern has not been documented before. (2016-04-04)

Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue experts
Contrary to public perception, die-offs in honeybee colonies are an agricultural not a conservation issue, argue Cambridge researchers, who say that manged honeybees may contribute to the genuine biodiversity crisis of Europe's declining wild pollinators. (2018-01-25)

'Bee' informed: Public interest exceeds understanding in bee conservation
Many people have heard bee populations are declining due to such threats as colony collapse disorder, pesticides and habitat loss. And many understand bees are critical to plant pollination. Yet, according to a study led by Utah State University ecologist Joseph Wilson, few are aware of the wide diversity of bees and other pollinators beyond such species as honeybees. Because conservation efforts require substantial public support, outreach is needed to help people understand bee declines and how to protect pollinators. (2017-09-05)

Some neonicotinoid pesticides are more toxic to bees than others; here's why
You've probably heard that the safety of neonicotinoid pesticides to bees is a matter of considerable controversy. However, neonicotinoids show varying toxicity to bees. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on March 22 have new evidence in honeybees and bumble bees that helps to explain why bees differ in their sensitivity to different neonicotinoids. (2018-03-22)

Honeybees at risk from Zika pesticides
Up to 13 percent of US beekeepers are in danger of losing their colonies due to pesticides sprayed to contain the Zika virus, new research suggests. (2018-10-29)

Experimental insecticide explodes mosquitoes, not honeybees
In a new study, Vanderbilt pharmacologist Jerod Denton, Ph.D., Ohio State entomologist Peter Piermarini, Ph.D., and colleagues report an experimental molecule that inhibits kidney function in mosquitoes and thus might provide a new way to control the deadliest animal on Earth. (2016-12-05)

The more kinds of bees, the better for humans, Rutgers-led study finds
The bigger the area to pollinate, the more species of wild bees you need to pollinate it. (2018-02-15)

Pesticides give bees a hard time
Scientists from the University of Würzburg have investigated the impact of a new pesticide on the honeybee. In high doses, it has a negative impact on the insects' taste and cognition ability. (2018-04-05)

In bee decline, fungicides emerge as improbable villain
When a Cornell-led team of scientists analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range contractions, they expected to find stressors like changes in land use, geography or insecticides. Instead, they found a shocker: fungicides, commonly thought to have no impact. (2017-11-14)

Inside the brains of killer bees
Africanized honeybees, commonly known as 'killer bees,' are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. Now researchers have examined neuropeptide changes that take place in Africanized honeybees' brains during aggressive behavior. The researchers, who report their results in the Journal of Proteome Research, also showed they could turn gentle bees into angry ones by injecting them with certain peptides. (2018-06-06)

Honeybees pick up 'astonishing' number of pesticides via non-crop plants
A Purdue University study shows that honeybees collect the vast majority of their pollen from plants other than crops, even in areas dominated by corn and soybeans, and that pollen is consistently contaminated with a host of agricultural and urban pesticides throughout the growing season. (2016-05-31)

Overuse of antibiotics brings risks for bees -- and for us
Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have found that honeybees treated with a common antibiotic were half as likely to survive the week after treatment compared with a group of untreated bees, a finding that may have health implications for bees and people alike. (2017-03-14)

If you swat mosquitoes, they may learn to avoid your scent
Most of us surely don't think of mosquitoes as being especially adept at learning. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 25 now show that mosquitoes can in fact learn to associate a particular odor with an unpleasant mechanical shock akin to being swatted. As a result, they'll avoid that scent the next time. (2018-01-25)

Saving our bees
The undisputed queen of animal pollinators is the bee, whose daily flights aid in the reproduction of more than half of the world's flowering plants. In recent years, however, an unprecedented decline in bee populations has placed the health of ecosystems an crops in peril. In an oral session at the ESA Annual Meeting, a group of scientists will explore the problem of bee habitat loss to determine what can be done to preserve bees in their native habitats. (2008-08-04)

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
Attacks by robber bees result in the evolution of larger guard bees and thus promote the division of labor in the hive. (2017-02-23)

How invasive species threaten bats
A new review is the first to describe the scope of threats to bats by invasive species. (2017-08-30)

Changing weather patterns throwing ecosystems out of whack
Species' lifecycles are slowly growing out of alignment, which can affect the functioning of ecosystems, ultimately impacting human food supply and disease. (2018-02-05)

Cross-kingdom regulation of honeybee caste development by dietary plant miRNAs
Honeybee larvae develop into workers but not queens, in part, because their diet of beebread/pollen is enriched in plant miRNAs. While miRNAs are generally negative regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes, they also negatively regulate larval development when honeybee larvae consume beebread/pollen and take up plant miRNAs. Xi Chen and Chen-Yu Zhang's group in Nanjing University, report this finding on Aug. 31, 2017, in PLOS Genetics. (2017-08-31)

Breakthrough could aid development of bee-friendly pesticides
Efforts to create pesticides that are not toxic to bees have been boosted by a scientific breakthrough. (2018-03-22)

Newly identified bacteria may help bees nourish their young
A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside have isolated three previously unknown bacterial species from wild bees and flowers. The bacteria, which belong to the genus Lactobacillus, may play a role in preserving the nectar and pollen that female bees store in their nests as food for their larvae. (2018-04-13)

Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialise in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-06-02)

Alien honeybees could cause plant extinction
New research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators. (2018-02-08)

Bees wearing reflectors help scientists track insects' training flights
Like aviators in training, honey bees preparing to forage learn their skills in a series of pre-flights to learn the landscape before undertaking new missions, say Illinois and UK scientists who used harmonic radar to track bees wearing ultra-light reflectors. (2000-02-02)

Honeybees become workers or queens depending on the plant microRNAs in their diet
Bee larvae develop into workers, in part, because their diet of pollen and honey, called beebread, is rich in plant regulatory molecules called microRNAs, which delay development and keep their ovaries inactive. Xi Chen of Nanjing University in China and colleagues, report these Aug. 31, 2017, in PLOS Genetics. (2017-08-31)

Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes
For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance. Biologists at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have now shed some new light on the benefits and disadvantages of the bee dance. (2019-02-22)

Having one eye better than the other may explain ants' left bias
Unlike Derek Zoolander, ants don't have any difficulty turning left. New research from the University of Bristol has now found rock ants often have one eye slightly better than the other, which could help explain why most of them prefer to turn left, given the choice. (2018-04-11)

Pesticides used to help bees may actually harm them
Honeybees from chlorothalanil-treated hives showed the greatest change in gut microbiome. (2016-08-08)

Evolutionary ecology could benefit beekeepers battling diseases
A review paper draws on scientific studies to recommend ways to reduce honeybee disease impacts, such as limiting the mixing of bees between colonies and supporting natural bee behaviors that provide disease resistance. (2017-08-29)

Flockmate or loner? Identifying the genes behind sociality in chickens
Five genes that affect sociality-related behavior in chickens have been identified by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden. Several of the genes have been previously linked to nervous system function or behavior. The new study, which is published in Genetics, is the first that assigns these genes a role in sociality. (2018-05-03)

Honeybees may unlock the secrets of how the human brain works
Sheffield academics have discovered honeybee colonies adhere to the same laws as the brain when making collective decisions. (2018-03-27)

Left or right? Like humans, bees have a preference
A discovery that bees have individual flying direction preferences could lead to strategies for steering drone aircraft fleets. Researchers at The University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute have found that honeybees have individually distinct biases in (2017-11-02)

Trees for bees
Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues. And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food. (2018-11-30)

Study: Global farming trends threaten food security
Citrus fruits, coffee and avocados: the food on our tables has become more diverse in recent decades. However, global agriculture does not reflect this trend. Monocultures are increasing worldwide, taking up more land than ever. At the same time, many of the crops being grown rely on pollination by insects and other animals. This puts food security at increased risk, as a team of researchers writes in the journal Global Change Biology. (2019-07-11)

Pollen stays on bee bodies right where flowers need it for pollination
After grooming, bees still have pollen on body parts that match the position of flower pollen-sacs and stigmas, according to a study published Sept. 6, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Petra Wester from Heinrich-Heine-University, Germany, and colleagues. (2017-09-06)

Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters
It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. Saunders. (2019-04-15)

Bees: How royal jelly prevents royal offspring from falling out of their cells
Defying gravity: A special mixture of proteins in the larval food of bees ensures that future queen larvae survive. Surprisingly this has less to do with nourishment than with gravity. The special properties of the proteins prevent the large and heavy larvae from falling out of their cells. Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have discovered how this is accomplished at a molecular level. Their study appeared in the internationally renowned journal 'Current Biology'. (2018-03-16)

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