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Popular Honeybees News and Current Events, Honeybees News Articles.
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Bees: How royal jelly prevents royal offspring from falling out of their cells
Defying gravity: A special mixture of proteins in the larval food of bees ensures that future queen larvae survive. Surprisingly this has less to do with nourishment than with gravity. The special properties of the proteins prevent the large and heavy larvae from falling out of their cells. Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have discovered how this is accomplished at a molecular level. Their study appeared in the internationally renowned journal 'Current Biology'. (2018-03-16)

Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies
Regulators worldwide currently use honeybees as the sole model species failing to account for potential threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species from bumblebees to solitary bees, which are probably more important for pollination of food crops than managed honeybees. They are potentially more vulnerable to pesticides given they nest in the ground and bumblebee queens have different life cycles that could increase exposure. (2018-12-11)

First pan-European field study shows neonicotinoid pesticides harm honeybees and wild bees
Researchers from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) publish results of a large-scale, field-realistic experiment to assess neonicotinoid impacts on honeybees and wild bees across Europe, in the peer-review journal Science on June 29, 2017. The experiment -- undertaken in the UK, Germany and Hungary -- exposed three bee species to winter oilseed rape crops treated with seed coatings containing neonicotinoid clothianidin, from Bayer CropScience, or Syngenta's thiamethoxam. (2017-06-29)

Native bees also facing novel pandemic
There is growing evidence that another ''pandemic'' has been infecting bees around the world for the past two decades, and is spreading: a fungal pathogen known as Nosema. (2020-07-09)

Correctly used neonics do not adversely affect honeybee colonies, new research finds
Amid mounting controversy over use of neonicotinoids and declining bee population, a new analysis by U of G scientists of previously unpublished studies and reports commissioned by agri-chemical companies Bayer and Syngenta -- as well as published papers from the scientific literature -- shows no significant ill effects on honeybee colonies from three common insecticides made by the companies. (2017-11-21)

Two pesticides approved for use in US harmful to bees
A previously banned insecticide, which was approved for agricultural use last year in the United States, is harmful for bees and other beneficial insects that are crucial for agriculture, and a second pesticide in widespread use also harms these insects. That is according to a new analysis from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-09-29)

Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteria
Modern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a new study suggests. (2018-04-17)

Queens control worker reproduction without castration in stingless bee species
Study contradicts the view that worker bees are forcibly castrated by the queen among the 600-odd species of stingless bees widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. (2017-09-12)

Similarities and dissimilarities between automatic learning in bees and humans
This study provides the first systematic comparison of automatic visual learning in humans and honeybees, showing that while both species extract statistical information about co-occurrence contingencies of visual scenes, in contrast to humans, bees do not automatically encode predictability information in those scenes. Since access to predictability has long been considered as key for acquiring complex knowledge effectively, this difference might provide hints about what leads to human's versatile learning and superior cognitive abilities. (2020-09-28)

New data unearths pesticide peril in beehives
Honeybees -- employed to pollinate crops during the blooming season -- encounter danger due to lingering and wandering pesticides, according to a new Cornell University study that analyzed the bee's own food. (2017-04-20)

Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows. (2019-06-12)

Bees can link symbols to numbers: Study
We know bees get the concept of zero and can do basic math. Now researchers have discovered they may also be capable of connecting symbols to numbers. It's a finding that sheds new light on how numerical abilities may have evolved over millennia and even opens new possibilities for communication between humans and other species. (2019-06-04)

Bark beetles control pathogenic fungi
Pathogens can drive the evolution of social behaviour in insects. This is shown by researchers from Bern and W├╝rzburg for ambrosia beetles. (2019-12-20)

Simulation explores how insects glean compass direction from skylight
A computational simulation suggests that insects may be capable of using the properties of light from the sky to determine their compass direction with an error of less than two degrees. Evripidis Gkanias of the University of Edinburgh, U.K., and colleagues present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-07-18)

Quantifying objects: bees recognize that six is more than four
A new study at the University of Cologne proves that insects can perform basic numerical cognition tasks. Their neuronal network can also be used to perform successful machine learning. (2020-03-02)

Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides
The lives of honeybees are shortened -- with evidence of physiological stress -- when they are exposed to the suggested application rates of two commercially available and widely used pesticides. (2020-06-16)

Fossilized bees were finicky pollen collectors
The ancestors of honeybees, living 50 million years ago, were fairly choosy when it came to feeding their offspring. This is shown in a study by the University of Bonn, which also included researchers from Austria and the United States. According to the study, the pollen that these insects collected for their larvae always originated from the same plants. (2015-11-12)

Tree cavities for wild honeybees
The forests in Europe provide habitat for around 80,000 colonies of wild honeybees. That is why more attention should be paid to preserving the nesting sites for these threatened insects, according to researchers. (2019-12-11)

Honeybees zero in on nothing
The number zero is the complex, abstract backbone of modern mathematics and technological advancements and now it's clear that bees are officially in the (2018-06-07)

Honeybees infect wild bumblebees -- through shared flowers
Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals. This research suggests commercial apiaries may need to be kept away from areas where there are vulnerable native pollinator species, like the endangered rusty patched bumblebee. (2019-06-26)

New behavior may use old genes
Though you may not be able to teach an old dog new tricks, ASU researchers have found that evolution may have taught old genes new tricks in the development of social behavior in honeybees. The genetic basis of social behavior is being deciphered through the efforts of ASU researchers and their work with the honeybee, Apis mellifera. (2006-10-25)

Flight of the bumble (and honey) bee
Honeybees and bumble bees are predictable in the way they move among flowers, typically moving directly from one to another in the same row of plants. The bees' flight paths affect their ability to hunt for pollen and generate (2009-03-20)

Fungicide impairs silk production, according to study
By testing an agrochemical designed to increase resistance on the mulberry plants used to feed silkworms, a research verified a rise in caterpillars' mortality and reduction in the size of cocoons. Intensive use of pesticides in monoculture systems may be the cause of silkworm crop losses in Brazil. (2018-06-06)

Study shows dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander
Researchers at the University of Sydney have found that the relationship between the Varroa mite and virulence of a virus of honey bees, has been misunderstood. The study challenges the long-held belief that the parasitic Varroa mite transmits the deformed wing virus of honeybees and in doing so changes the virus to make it more virulent and deadly. Research published today concludes that this belief is incorrect. (2019-01-29)

Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning
A new University of Michigan study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp. (2019-05-07)

More flowers and pollinator diversity could help protect bees from parasites
Having more flowers and maintaining diverse bee communities could help reduce the spread of bee parasites, according to a new study. (2020-07-22)

Big bumblebees learn locations of best flowers
Big bumblebees take time to learn the locations of the best flowers, new research shows. (2020-12-28)

Biologists identify honeybee 'clean' genes known for improving survival
The key to breeding disease-resistant honeybees could lie in a group of genes -- known for controlling hygienic behaviour -- that enable colonies to limit the spread of harmful mites and bacteria, according to genomics research conducted at York University. The researchers narrowed in on the 'clean' genes known to improve the colony's chance of survival. The finding was published today in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. (2019-02-15)

Hairy tongues help bats drink up
A new model devised by MIT engineers describes how hairy tongues help bats drink up. (2018-02-07)

Genes key to killer bee's success
In a new study, researchers from Uppsala University sequenced the genomes of Africanized bees that have invaded large parts of the world to find out what makes them so extraordinarily successful. One particular region in the genome caught the researchers' attention and the genes found there could be part of the explanation for the aggressive advances of these hybrid bees. (2017-04-05)

Confronting colony collapse
Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. They found that each species of mite used its own distinct strategy to survive in its bee host, potentially overwhelming the bees' defenses. In addition to pointing to how scientists might vanquish these deadly intruders, the findings also shed light on how parasites and hosts evolve in response to one another. (2019-10-03)

Native milkweed cultivars planted by the public can support monarch butterflies and bees
Millions of people plant pollinator gardens in an effort to provide monarch butterflies with food along their annual migration route from overwintering sites in the highland forests of central Mexico to summer breeding grounds in the United States and southern Canada. For the first time, entomologists studied how effective native milkweed cultivars in small gardens are at attracting and supporting monarchs - their results suggest that this can be a valuable additional food source. (2020-10-07)

Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees
A new paper in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reveals that adjuvants, chemicals commonly added to pesticides, amplify toxicity affecting mortality rates, flight intensity, colony intensity, and pupae development in honey bees. (2019-08-05)

Study sheds light on 'overlooked' bee species
The UK's first citizen science project focusing on solitary, ground-nesting bees has revealed that they nest in a far broader range of habitats than previously thought. (2019-12-11)

Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking
Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonizing the UK and killing honeybees, new research shows. (2018-07-04)

Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators
A team led by entomologists at the University of California, Riverside, performed a study on the Big Island and found viruses associated with the varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees, have spilled over into the western yellowjacket, a honeybee predator and honey raider. The result is a hidden, yet remarkable, change in the genetic diversity of viruses associated with the larger pathogen community of the mite and wasp, with repercussions yet to be understood. (2019-01-08)

'Intensive' beekeeping not to blame for common bee diseases
More 'intensive' beekeeping does not raise the risk of diseases that harm or kill the insects, new research suggests. (2019-07-17)

Epigenetic patterns determine if honeybee larvae become queens or workers
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Australian National University have unravelled how changes in nutrition in the early development of honeybees can result in vastly different adult characteristics. (2018-08-22)

Primates harvest bee nests in Ugandan reserve
In the first study of native African honeybees and honey-making stingless bees in the same habitat, humans and chimpanzees are the primary bee nest predators. (2006-02-28)

UI scientist: Honeybee hive collapse mystery rooted in hive size
University of Idaho professor Brian Dennis is helping scientists understand a baffling but vitally important puzzle: What is causing the decline of honeybees? Working in collaboration with William Kemp, a US Department of Agriculture scientist, Dennis has built a mathematical model that lays the blame on the bees. The model indicates that any or all suspected environmental factors, alone or in combination, could lead to hive collapse by destabilizing a hive's adult bee population. (2016-02-24)

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