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Popular Honeybees News and Current Events, Honeybees News Articles.
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Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring. (2020-10-06)

Research reveals why plant diversity is so important for bee diversity
A study in southern England reveals why bumble bees and honey bees thrive despite foraging on the same flowers. (2021-02-10)

Primates harvest bee nests in Ugandan reserve
In the first study of native African honeybees and honey-making stingless bees in the same habitat, humans and chimpanzees are the primary bee nest predators. (2006-02-28)

How honeybees read the waggle dance
Neurons that enable honeybees to sense the waggle dance -- a form of symbolic communication used by female bees to inform the hivemates about the location of a food source -- are investigated in new research published in JNeurosci. (2017-10-09)

The secret to better berries? Wild bees
New research shows wild bees are essential for producing larger and better blueberry yields - with plumper, faster-ripening berries. The study is the first to show that wild bees improve not only blueberry quantities, but also size and other quality factors. It finds they produce greater berry size (12 percent), quantity (12 percent), size consistency (11 percent), and earlier harvests -- by two and a half days. (2018-11-28)

Managed apiaries may lead to higher rates of viral infection in wild bumblebees
Viral pathogens that might play a role in the decline in wild bumblebees may be transmitted from managed honeybees through flowers, according to a study published June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Samantha Alger of the University of Vermont, and colleagues. (2019-06-26)

UI scientist: Honeybee hive collapse mystery rooted in hive size
University of Idaho professor Brian Dennis is helping scientists understand a baffling but vitally important puzzle: What is causing the decline of honeybees? Working in collaboration with William Kemp, a US Department of Agriculture scientist, Dennis has built a mathematical model that lays the blame on the bees. The model indicates that any or all suspected environmental factors, alone or in combination, could lead to hive collapse by destabilizing a hive's adult bee population. (2016-02-24)

Appreciating a flower's texture, color, and shape leads to better drone landings
A team of TU Delft and the Westphalian University of Applied Sciences researchers present an optical flow-based learning process that allows robots to estimate distances through the visual appearance (shape, color, texture) of the objects in view. This artificial intelligence (AI)-based learning strategy increases the navigation skills of small flying drones and entails a new hypothesis on insect intelligence. (2021-01-19)

Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humans
Neonicotinoids are currently the most widely used pesticides in the world and frequently make headlines because of their harmful effects on honeybees and other insect pollinators. Now, a study published in the prestigious journal Environmental Health Perspectives, indicates they may also have an impact on human health by disrupting our hormonal systems. This study by INRS professor Thomas Sanderson indicates that more work must be done on the potential endocrine-disrupting effects of neonicotinoids. (2018-04-26)

Wild bees: Champions for food security and protecting our biodiversity
Pollinators provide many benefits, including pollinating food crops and wild flowers in the countryside which in turn provide food for a wide range of animals. The threats to them are numerous and have already caused severe declines. The status of European pollinators, the causes of declines, and their value to society were presented by scientists at a special symposium of the 5th EurBee meeting held in Germany. (2012-09-06)

'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebees
The many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a 'virtual safe space' created by scientists at the University of Exeter. (2018-05-22)

Pesticide deadly to bees now easily detected in honey
A common insecticide that is a major hazard for honeybees is now effectively detected in honey thanks to a simple new method. (2020-11-24)

Spiders go ballooning on electric fields
The aerodynamic capabilities of spiders have intrigued scientists for hundreds of years. Charles Darwin himself mused over how hundreds of the creatures managed to alight on the Beagle on a calm day out at sea and later take-off from the ship with great speeds on windless day. (2018-07-05)

Honeybees prioritize well-fed larvae for emergency queen-rearing
New research shows that honeybees prioritize the nutritional status of larvae when selecting for a new emergency queen. (2018-06-07)

Heat forms potentially harmful substance in high-fructose corn syrup
Researchers have established the conditions that foster formation of potentially dangerous levels of a toxic substance in the high-fructose corn syrup often fed to honey bees. Their study, which appears in ACS' biweekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could also help keep the substance out of soft drinks and dozens of other human foods that contain HFCS. (2009-10-14)

Field trial with neonicotinoids: Honeybees are much more robust than bumblebees
The insecticide clothianidin affects different species of bees in different ways. While it has no demonstrably negative effect on honeybees, it disrupts the growth of bumblebees and threatens the survival of entire colonies. However, the insecticide does not make either species more susceptible to diseases and pathogens, as a massive field study in Sweden shows. The latest findings were published in the renowned journal ''Nature Communications''. (2019-04-23)

The bee that would be queen
A team of researchers from Arizona State University, Purdue University and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences has discovered evidence that honeybees have adopted a phylogenetically old molecular cascade -- TOR (target of rapamycin), linked to nutrient and energy sensing -- and put it to use in caste development. They found that queen-fate can be blocked, and that workers develop, when TOR activity is reduced during development. (2007-06-05)

Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first
The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth amid the first appearance of flowering plants, new research reveals. (2018-08-07)

Flower attracts insects by pretending to be a mushroom
The mysterious flowers of Aspidistra elatior are found on the southern Japanese island of Kuroshima. Until recently, scientists thought that A. elatior has the most unusual pollination ecology among all flowering plants, being pollinated by slugs and amphipods. However, direct observation of their ecosystem has revealed that they are mainly pollinated by fungus gnats, probably thanks to their resemblance to mushrooms. (2017-11-14)

Major European project taking steps to protect pollinators
The value of pollination services in Europe is worth about €22 ($31) billion each year and Europe's pollinators are in serious decline. The STEP project is comprised of a leading team of more than 50 researchers who are working together to conserve Europe's pollinators. (2011-05-16)

Careful Honeybee Breeding Combats Tracheal Mite Pests
A study at Ohio State University has shown that selective breeding helps honeybees develop resistance to tracheal mites, pests that beekeepers normally control with insecticide. The research indicates that with a combination of selective breeding and other natural controls, beekeepers may maintain healthy hives without relying on chemical controls. (1998-01-20)

Bees 'dumb down' after ingesting tiny doses of the pesticide chlorpyrifos
Honeybees suffer severe learning and memory deficits after ingesting very small doses of the pesticide chlorpyrifos, potentially threatening their success and survival, new research from New Zealand's University of Otago suggests. (2016-03-01)

A quarter of known bee species haven't appeared in public records since the 1990s
Researchers at the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) in Argentina have found that, since the 1990s, up to 25% of reported bee species are no longer being reported in global records, despite a large increase in the number of records available. While this does not mean that these species are all extinct, it might indicate that these species have become rare enough that no one is observing them in nature. The findings appear January 22 in the journal One Earth. (2021-01-22)

How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. In a Review publishing March 30 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Andreas Nieder, a neurobiologist at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, explores the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the impact on their survival, arguing that we won't fully understand the influence of numerical competence unless we study it directly. (2020-03-30)

Can stress management help save honeybees?
Honeybee populations are clearly under stress -- from the Varroa mite, insecticides, and other factors -- but it's been difficult to pinpoint any one of them as the root cause of devastating losses in honeybee hives. Researchers in a new paper say that the problem likely stems from a complex and poorly understood interplay of stresses and their impact on bee health. It's a situation they suspect might be improved through stress management and better honeybee nutrition. (2014-11-24)

East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests... for now
Several parasites and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and the United States are spreading across East Africa, but do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations at this time, according to an international team of researchers. (2014-04-17)

Substances associated with bee ferocity are discovered
Chemical compounds identified by Brazilian researchers may explain why less aggressive bees become ferocious. Study is published in Journal of Proteome Research. (2018-08-14)

Biodiversity protects bee communities from disease
A new analysis of thousands of native and nonnative Michigan bees shows that the most diverse bee communities have the lowest levels of three common viral pathogens. (2021-02-12)

Rising CO2 levels reduce protein in crucial pollen source for bees
Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide have reduced protein in goldenrod pollen, a key late-season food source for North American bees, a Purdue University study shows. (2016-04-13)

Pathogenic plant virus jumps to honeybees
A viral pathogen that typically infects plants has been found in honeybees and could help explain their decline. Researchers working in the U.S. and Beijing, China report their findings in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2014-01-21)

Seeing the colored light: Bee brains open way for better cameras
Cameras in drones and robots have trouble dealing with detecting color when the light is changing. But bees, it turns out, have a mechanism that solves this problem and that can be used to improve cameras. (2017-07-03)

A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
Today, scientists of the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera. This article emphasizes the need to develop sustainable agricultural and apicultural schemes. (2019-06-04)

Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work
This is the first plant species in the world found to have adapted traits that enables a mutually beneficial relationship with ants. (2020-06-10)

Scientists link honeybees' changing roles throughout their lives to brain chemistry
Scientists have been linking an increasing range of behaviors and inclinations from monogamy to addiction to animals', including humans', underlying biology. To that growing list, they're adding division of labor -- at least in killer bees. A report published in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research presents new data that link the amounts of certain neuropeptides in these notorious bees' brains with their jobs inside and outside the hive. (2014-05-07)

Survival of the rarest: Fruit flies shed light on the evolution of behavior
New study reveals why it's beneficial to stand out in nature. (2007-05-09)

Simulated honeybees can use simple brain circuits for complex learning
Honeybees may not need key brain structures known as mushroom bodies in order to learn complex associations between odors and rewards, according to new research published in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-06-22)

Study identifies spread of bee disease via flowers
One in 11 flowers carries disease-causing parasites known to contribute to bee declines, according to a Cornell University study that identifies how flowers act as hubs for transmitting diseases to bees and other pollinators. (2020-07-23)

UCR's Douglas Altshuler to receive the 2006 George A. Bartholomew Award
Douglas Altshuler, an assistant professor of biology at UC Riverside who studies flying animals, has been selected to receive the 2006 George A. Bartholomew Award (2006-09-12)

Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in pollinator-dependent crops
A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California. (2019-08-30)

Genome sequencing shows climate barrier to spread of Africanized bees
Since the 1950s, ''Africanized'' honeybees have spread north and south across the Americas until apparently coming to a halt in California and northern Argentina. Now genome sequencing of hundreds of bees from the northern and southern limits shows a gradual decline in African ancestry across hundreds of miles, rather than an abrupt shift. (2020-10-21)

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