Popular Hormones News and Current Events

Popular Hormones News and Current Events, Hormones News Articles.
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Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormones
A bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. In an opinion article published in Trends in Plant Science, researchers in France explore how plant hormones may influence human health. (2017-08-22)

What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
A new University of Washington-led study examines one key stress-inducing circumstance -- the effects of social hierarchy -- and how cells respond to the hormones that are released in response to that stress. (2018-12-11)

Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants
A New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars. (2017-12-06)

UNLV study finds no testosterone changes in esports gamers
Players of the competitive esports video game League of Legends showed no change in testosterone during game play, UNLV researchers have found. (2018-02-16)

Conservation endocrinology in a changing world
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-05-10)

Research reveals how estrogen regulates gene expression
The sequential recruitment of coactivators to the estrogen receptor complex results in dynamic specific structural and functional changes that are necessary for effective regulation of gene expression. (2017-08-24)

Study finds that weight loss after obesity surgery can rapidly restore testosterone production and sex drive in morbidly obese men
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) shows that weight reduction following a sleeve gastrectomy (obesity surgery), which reduces the size of the stomach, can rapidly reverse obesity-related hypogonadism in morbidly obese men, restoring normal levels of testosterone and sex drive. (2018-05-25)

Warm showers and ball exercises may help women during childbirth
A new International Journal of Nursing Practice study demonstrates that during childbirth, women may benefit from warm showers, perineal exercises with a ball, or the combination of both strategies. (2018-03-07)

Sex, drugs and estradiol: why cannabis affects women differently
Sex differences in cannabis use are beginning to be explained with the aid of brain studies in animals and humans. A new paper in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience brings us up to date on progress. (2018-10-26)

RUDN University chemists suggest a new way to synthesize steroid analogs
Scientists from RUDN University and the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv have found a way to produce aromatic rings in organic compounds in three stages. These stages proceed successively in one-pot conditions and at room temperature. Now analogues of hormones, steroids, some sugars, terpenes and other complex organic substances can be synthesized faster and at softer conditions. The paper was published in Tetrahedron Letters. (2017-11-15)

Brain changes after menopause may lead to lack of physical activity
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found a connection between lack of ovarian hormones and changes in the brain's pleasure center, a hotspot in the brain that processes and reinforces messages related to reward, pleasure, activity and motivation for physical exercise. Findings suggest that activation of brain receptors in that part of the brain may serve as a future treatment to improve motivation for physical activity in postmenopausal women. (2016-07-28)

The role of the gut microbiome in posttraumatic stress disorder: More than a gut feeling
The bacteria in your gut could hold clues to whether or not you will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing a traumatic event. (2017-10-25)

General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out
In a study published online April 18 in Neuron, researchers found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep. They traced this neural circuitry back to a cluster of cells at the base of the brain responsible for churning out hormones to regulate bodily functions, mood, and sleep. The finding could lead to better drugs capable of putting people to sleep with fewer side effects. (2019-04-18)

Sex hormones skew outcomes in clinical trials -- here's how
Clinical research often excludes females from their trials under the assumption that 'one size fits all,' that a painkiller or antidepressant will be equally effective in subjects of either sex, but a growing number of scientists are criticizing this approach. In an Essay published in Cell Metabolism, one group argues that hormones make a difference in how potential therapeutics behave, and both males and females must be accounted for to move medical advances forward. (2016-08-09)

Both obese and anorexic women have low levels of 'feel good' neurosteroid
Women at opposite extremes of the weight spectrum have low levels of the neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone, according to new research published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. (2017-11-10)

Study links fox domestication to gene activity in the pituitary gland
A study of foxes offers new insights into the brain changes that occur in wild canids as they become more tame, researchers report. The study links fox domestication to changes in gene activity in the pituitary gland, a brain center that kicks out hormones to regulate various bodily functions, including the stress response. (2018-02-14)

Contraception influences sexual desire in committed relationships
How often women in heterosexual couples desire sex depends on how committed the relationship is and what type of birth control the woman uses. (2016-12-08)

CRAG and UB researchers find basic mechanisms for root growth and cell replenishment
Interdisciplinary collaboration between physics and molecular biology enabled researchers to solve fundamental doubts on plant root growth. These findings provide opportunities to create more drought-resistant plants, which is one of the most important problems in the current context of the climate change. (2018-01-29)

What role does the gut play in type 2 diabetes?
In the destructive cycle that leads to and perpetuates type 2 diabetes, driven by overeating, excessive blood glucose, defective pancreatic beta cell function, and imbalances in insulin-regulating hormone levels, the gut appears to play a key role. (2017-08-03)

Hormones may affect girls' interests, but not their gender identity or playmates
Prenatal exposure to androgens is not associated with girls spending more or less time with other girls, but was associated with an increased interest in activities that have traditionally been thought of as masculine, according to Penn State researchers, who say it supports the idea that gender development is complex and does not solely rely on either biological or social factors. (2018-03-01)

Zebra 'poo science' improves conservation efforts
How can Zebra poo tell us what an animal's response to climate change and habitat destruction will be? That is what scientists from The University of Manchester and Chester Zoo have been investigating in South Africa. Together the team have been using 'poo science' to understand how challenges or 'stressors', such as the destruction and breakup of habitats, impact on populations of South Africa's Cape mountain zebra. (2017-11-01)

Fracking the immune system
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life. (2018-05-01)

Spa therapy helps Japan's snow monkeys cope with the cold
Japanese macaques, also known as snow monkeys, have been enjoying regular baths in the hot spring at Jigokudani in Japan for decades -- and have even become a popular tourist attraction. A team of researchers led by Rafaela Takeshita of Kyoto University in Japan have now published the first study to scientifically validate the benefits of this behavior. These findings indicate how behavioral flexibility can help counter cold-climate stress and have likely implications for reproduction and survival. (2018-04-03)

Bariatric surgery successes lead to type 2 diabetes treatment
Bariatric surgery has long yielded almost immediate health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes, and new findings from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine may be the key to developing drug alternatives to surgery. (2018-04-24)

Spay and neuter for dogs: Avoiding the health consequences
In the United States, spaying or neutering a dog has become standard practice to reduce pet overpopulation. Yet recent research has shed light on the long-term health impacts of the lack of natural hormonal balance resulting from removal of the gonads. This research article includes details on alternatives to traditional spay and neuter and encourages an individualized approach to determining the best contraceptive option for each dog. (2018-10-30)

Don't blame adolescent social behavior on hormones
Reproductive hormones that develop during puberty are not responsible for changes in social behavior that occur during adolescence, according to the results of a newly published study by a University at Buffalo researcher. 'Changes in social behavior during adolescence appear to be independent of pubertal hormones. They are not triggered by puberty, so we can't blame the hormones,' says Matthew Paul, an assistant professor in UB's Department of Psychology. (2018-03-19)

University of Guelph researchers discover why females have heart health advantage
University of Guelph Prof. Tami Martino has revealed in a first-ever study the biological reasons why females have a heart health advantage over men and it's tied to ovarian hormones. Essentially the interplay between female ovarian hormones and a circadian 'clock' molecule protects the heart health of women until they reach menopause. (2017-10-04)

Hormones influence unethical behavior
Hormones play a two-part role in encouraging and reinforcing cheating and other unethical behavior, according to research from Harvard University and The University of Texas at Austin. (2015-07-28)

Study finds humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birth
Vertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in Scientific Reports. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal stress on offspring stress hormone levels using data from all known studies across vertebrates. (2018-04-10)

Brain anatomy of dyslexia is not the same in men and women, boys and girls
Using MRI, neuroscientists have found significant differences in brain anatomy when comparing men and women with dyslexia to their non-dyslexic control groups. Their study is the first to directly compare brain anatomy of females with and without dyslexia. (2013-05-08)

New mums' voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study
The pitch of new mothers' voices temporarily drops after they have had their first baby. (2018-05-30)

Feces from entangled North Atlantic right whales reveals 'sky-high' stress levels
In a new study published this week in Endangered Species Research, North Atlantic right whale scientists found that whales who undergo prolonged entanglements in fishing gear endure 'sky-high hormone levels,' indicating severe stress, which researchers discovered using a pioneering technique of examining scat from live, entangled, and dead whales over 15 years. (2017-11-29)

Pregnancy may help protect against bladder cancer
Pregnancy seems to confer some protection against bladder cancer in mice, scientists have found. Female mice that had never become pregnant had approximately 15 times as much cancer in their bladders as their counterparts that had become pregnant, according to new findings by investigators at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Their work appears online as a rapid communication in the journal Urology. (2008-06-26)

Experts call for better research into link between women's hormones and mood disorders
In a recently published study, women's health experts from the University of Alberta argue there is an urgent need for carefully designed, gender-specific research to better understand the relationship of female sex hormones to mood states and disorders. (2007-12-12)

Mixed chemicals in beauty products may harm women's hormones
A new study published in Environment International by George Mason University Assistant Professor of Global and Community Health Dr. Anna Pollack and colleagues discovered links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products and changes in reproductive hormones. (2018-09-13)

Scientists identify two hormones that burn fat faster, prevent and reverse diabetes in mice
UCLA geneticists have created a new technique to hunt for hormones that influence how organs and tissues communicate with each other. The method enabled them to find naturally occurring molecules that play major roles in Type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. (2018-05-01)

Inexplicable spasms can now be explained with hormones
Too low a level of a hormone in the blood which protects against stress may be the cause of epilepsy-like seizures which doctors had otherwise believed had solely psychological causes. New research results from Aarhus University may help to improve the diagnosis and treatment of an otherwise mystifying disorder. (2017-11-03)

Noise from oil and gas operations stresses birds, hinders reproduction
Birds exposed to constant noise from oil and gas operations show physiological signs of chronic stress, have chicks whose growth is stunted, and -- in some cases -- lay fewer eggs that hatch, according to a new study. (2018-01-08)

Emotionally supportive relationships linked to lower testosterone
Science and folklore alike have long suggested that high levels of testosterone can facilitate the sorts of attitudes and behavior that make for, well, a less than ideal male parent. (2015-11-10)

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