Popular Hospice News and Current Events

Popular Hospice News and Current Events, Hospice News Articles.
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Include patient's bucket list in end-of-life care conversations
Talking to patients with chronic and serious illnesses about their life goals and bucket-lists can help clinicians present treatment options and participate in informed decision-making with a clearer understanding of the potential impact of medical treatments. (2018-02-08)

Many brain tumor patients do not receive adequate end-of-life care
While more than 60 percent of patients with the brain tumors called malignant gliomas enroll in hospice services, almost a quarter of them do so within a week of death, probably too late for patients and family members to benefit from hospice care. (2017-12-20)

Brain tumor patients fare better with private insurance, new study finds
Brain tumor patients who are uninsured or use Medicaid stay hospitalized longer and develop more medical complications than those with private insurance, University of Florida Health researchers have found. (2015-03-03)

Wisdom at the end of life
In a paper publishing Jan. 24 in the journal International Psychogeriatrics, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine asked 21 hospice patients, ages 58 to 97 and in the last six months of their lives, to describe the core characteristics of wisdom and whether their terminal illnesses had changed or impacted their understanding of wisdom. (2018-01-24)

For leukemia patients, transfusion needs may delay hospice care
Researchers report that thousands of leukemia patients who received frequent transfusions had very short stays in hospice at the end of life, suggesting that transfusion dependence presents a barrier to making meaningful use of palliative care. (2017-12-09)

Early access to palliative care associated with better quality of life
Patients with advanced cancer have a significantly better quality of life in the weeks before they die if they receive early access to palliative care, according to research published today. (2018-01-31)

Transfusion dependence a barrier to quality end-of-life care for some with leukemia
For patients with advanced leukemia, access to high-quality end-of-life care appears to be reduced in those dependent on blood transfusions, according to a new study being presented during the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta. The study associates this reduced access and consequent diminished use of hospice services with a reduced quality of end-of-life care for these patients. (2017-12-11)

How does it compare?: Hospice care at home, at assisted living facility, at nursing home
A new study from Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute compares quality of hospice services provided for patients living at home, in assisted living facility and in nursing homes as perceived by family members. Findings, which reveal subtle but significant differences in perceived quality have potential to help influence priorities for improvement of quality, patient choice of hospice service provider and reimbursement for these services. (2018-02-15)

Palliative, hospice care lacking among dying cancer patients, Stanford researcher finds
Medical societies, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life. Yet major gaps persist between these recommendations and real-life practice, a new study shows. (2016-05-27)

Why fewer blood cancer patients receive hospice care
Research has shown that patients with blood cancers are less likely to enroll in hospice care than patients with solid cancers, and the findings from a national survey suggest that concerns about the adequacy of hospice may prevent blood cancer specialists from referring their patients. (2017-05-22)

Primary care physician involvement at end of life associated with less costly, less intensive care
A new study published in the January/February issue of Annals of Family Medicine finds that primary care physician involvement at the end of life is associated with less costly and less intensive end-of-life care. (2017-01-09)

Playing a conversation game may encourage advance care planning
Few people may want to spend a Saturday night planning their end-of-life care, but playing a game designed to spur conversation about advance care planning may be a more enjoyable way to ease into the process, according to researchers. (2017-10-11)

How common, preventable are sepsis-associated deaths in hospitals?
This study estimates how common sepsis-related deaths are in hospitals and how preventable those deaths might be. In a retrospective study using medical record reviews of 568 patients who died in six US hospitals or who were discharged to hospice in 2014 or 2015, sepsis was present in more than half (300) of the hospitalizations and directly caused death in more than one-third (198) of cases. (2019-02-15)

Majority of hospice workers don't have end-of-life wishes themselves
One might assume that health care providers, especially those dealing with terminally ill patients, such as hospice workers would have a living will or advance directive. Surprisingly, Florida Atlantic University researchers found that the majority of hospice workers did not have an advance directive. Procrastination, fear of the subject and costs were reported as the most common barriers. (2017-11-09)

Physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive care at end of life
New research suggests that US physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive or critical care units in the last months of life than non-physicians. Hospitalization rates were similar. (2016-05-16)

Palliative care may mean fewer difficult transitions for older adults nearing end of life
A team of researchers decided to examine whether palliative care could make life easier for older adults with serious illnesses who live in nursing homes, especially as they neared the end of their lives. The team studied the connection between palliative care treatment and very ill nursing home residents' need for emergency services or hospital admissions. The researchers published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2016-11-18)

Hospice caregivers should be screened early to prevent depression, anxiety
A study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety. (2017-02-08)

Health professionals need support to help children of terminally ill patients
Health professionals require more guidance to prepare and support children when a parent is dying, a new study in the journal Palliative Medicine reports. (2018-11-05)

Medicare kidney failure patients enter hospice too late to reap full benefits
Late referrals to hospice drive up end-of-life costs and limit benefits for patients on dialysis. (2018-04-30)

Study examines racial differences in quality of end-of-life care
An analysis of survey data found no significant racial differences in various aspects of the quality of end-of-life care, although survey respondents reported deficiencies in the quality of end-of-life care for both black and white patients who died, including unmet symptom needs, problems with communication and less than optimal decision-making, according to an article published by JAMA Internal Medicine. (2017-10-09)

Palliative care interventions associated with improvements in patient quality of life, symptom burden
In a study appearing in the Nov. 22/29 issue of JAMA, Dio Kavalieratos, Ph.D., of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues examined the association of palliative care with quality of life, symptom burden, survival, and other outcomes for people with life-limiting illness and for their caregivers. (2016-11-22)

Tension around autonomy increases family conflict at end of life
Conflict within families can be stressful and confusing, and it can lead to feelings of sadness. It also is incredibly common and in many cases, a necessary part of family dynamics. New research from the University of Missouri highlights how caregivers can better manage family conflict as they deal with the approaching death of a loved one. (2019-10-03)

Study: Nursing homes increasingly pushing patients into rehab at end-of-life
A new study reveals a growing trend of potentially unnecessary -- and harmful -- high intensity rehabilitation services for residents of nursing homes. The study finds that this trend, which may be driven by a desire to maximize reimbursement rates, is on the rise for patients in the last 30 days of life, indicating that these services may be interfering with appropriate end-of-life care. (2018-10-03)

Unique case of cannabis hyperemesis syndrome in palliative care
The medical use of cannabis is growing. Medical marijuana may improve symptoms including pain and anorexia. While it may improve nausea and vomiting, it can rarely cause a hyperemesis syndrome with chronic use. (2019-06-10)

Early palliative care for advanced lung cancer increases survival
Early palliative care is associated with better survival in patients with advanced lung cancer, according researchers with the Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System and Oregon Health and Science University. (2019-09-19)

For dying patients, early plans can improve quality of life
Careful documentation of a hospice patient's end-of-life wishes -- and prominently noting that information in health records early -- could prevent unwanted hospitalizations and medical interventions, a new study suggests. (2019-06-06)

Mor earns GSA's 2016 Robert W. Kleemeier Award
The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Vincent Mor, Ph.D., of Brown University as the 2016 recipient of the Robert W. Kleemeier Award. (2016-07-26)

The heavier the person, the lower the chance of getting hospice care or dying at home
The heavier someone is, the less likely they are to have what many people might call a 'good death,' with hospice care and a chance to die at home, a new study finds. And that difference comes with a financial, as well as a personal, cost, the research shows. (2017-02-06)

Doctors don't die differently than anyone else, CU Anschutz researchers say
A new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus appears to disprove the increasingly popular notion that doctors die differently than everyone else, using fewer interventions that often have little value. (2016-05-17)

Unequal pain relief at home for dying patients
Pain relief and end of life care is not being provided equally to people with advanced progressive diseases who were at home during their last three months of life, according to a study of 43,000 people who died across England. (2019-03-21)

Prediction system significantly increases palliative care consults
A trigger system powered by predictive analytics increased palliative care consultations by 75 percent after its implementation (2019-09-25)

Study finds hospice use does not increase long stay nursing home decedents' care costs
Use of hospice services does not increase care costs in the last six months of life for long-stay nursing homes residents according to an analysis conducted by researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute. (2016-05-05)

Palliative care important for prison population, too
With an increasingly aging prison population, end-of-life care for inmates is becoming a more prominent issue, according to Penn State nursing researchers. End-of-life -- EOL -- care can be complicated, no matter who the patient is, but can be especially challenging for those behind bars. (2016-02-26)

Modify hospice eligibility for dementia patients, says Institute for Aging Research study
The system for hospice admissions for patients with advanced dementia, a terminal illness, should be guided by patient and family preference for comfort, not estimated life expectancy, says a new study published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American Medical Association by the Institute for Aging Research of Hebrew SeniorLife. (2010-11-02)

Brown expert offers guide to end-of-life care
Joan Teno, M.D., professor of community health and medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, has co-written a guide to help doctors place their patients in the best possible hospice care. Details on the guide will be published in the Feb. 11, 2009, edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2009-02-10)

Racial-ethnic disparities in the quality of end-of-life care among lung cancer patients
Significant disparities in the quality of end-of-life lung cancer care were found among racial-ethnic minorities, with higher odds of experiencing potentially preventable medical encounters during end-of-life as compared with non-Hispanic whites. (2018-05-10)

Study compares hospice care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and patient homes
A new study from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute has found only minimal differences in the intensity of hospice services provided in nursing homes as compared to hospice services provided to patients in assisted living facilities or their homes. However the mix of services did vary by site type. (2017-03-23)

Landmark international study: CAR T-cell therapy safe and effective in youth with leukemia
Results of the global, multicenter, pivotal phase 2 study that led to the first FDA approval of a gene therapy/cell therapy approach known as CAR T-cell therapy, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Senior authors on the study include Stephen A. Grupp, of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Michael A. Pulsipher, M.D., of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). (2018-01-31)

Dying from dementia
In an editorial in the Oct. 15, 2009, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Greg Sachs, M.D., professor of medicine and director of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine and a Regenstrief Institute investigator, notes that end-of-life care for most older adults with dementia has not changed in decades and urges that these individuals be provided far greater access to palliative care, the management of pain and other symptoms. (2009-10-14)

CARING Criteria shows 1 year death risk at time of hospital admission
A new tool allows doctors to recognize patients at highest mortality risk, matching treatments to values and health goals. (2013-12-05)

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