Popular Hpv News and Current Events

Popular Hpv News and Current Events, Hpv News Articles.
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BJC press notice
Please contact the BJC press office for the full paper or with any other questions on 0203 469 8300, out of hours, 07050 264 059 or bjcpress@cancer.org.uk. Scientists can be directly contacted regarding media interviews using the contact details provided. (2019-03-19)

Could mouth rinse to detect HPV DNA be associated with predicting risk of head/neck cancer recurrence, death?
Researchers examined if a mouth rinse to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA might be associated with helping to predict risk of recurrence of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death. This study included 396 adults with head and neck squamous cell cancer of the mouth or throat, of which 202 patients had HPV-positive cancers. (2019-05-02)

There's a better way to screen for cervical cancer
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that high-quality cervical cancer screening can be done effectively using a completely automated approach. The researchers involved in the study indicate that automated technology could increase cervical screening coverage in underserved regions. (2018-04-11)

Self-sampling identifies twice as many women at risk of cervical cancer
Using self-sampling followed by HPV testing, more than twice as many women at risk of developing cervical cancer could be identified and offered preventive treatment. This is shown by researchers at Uppsala University in the first randomised study in the world comparing two ways of identifying cervical cancer, published today in the British Journal of Cancer. (2018-02-15)

HPV vaccine is effective, safe 10 years after it's given
A decade of data on hundreds of boys and girls who received the HPV vaccine indicates the vaccine is safe and effective long term in protecting against the most virulent strains of the virus, researchers report. The findings support more widespread and early administration of the HPV vaccine before preadolescents and adolescents are exposed to the nation's most common sexually transmitted infection and the most common cause of cervical cancer, they report in the journal Pediatrics. (2017-11-29)

2018 AACR Annual Meeting presentations highlight the clinical utility of Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR technology for discovering epigenetic biomarkers and measuring immunotherapy response
Researchers showcase how droplet digital PCR technology can be used to identify epigenetic biomarkers to determine cancer recurrence after surgery and measure circulating tumor DNA for immunotherapy response. (2018-04-14)

On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancer
CU Cancer Center study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer. (2017-08-23)

Improving cervical cancer screening rates for transgender men
A new study indicates that alternative options for cervical cancer screening, including self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, could improve the screening rate among transgender men. (2017-09-08)

Cutting off cervical cancer's fuel supply stymies tumors
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don't respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer's fuel supply. (2018-02-14)

More dentists to discuss risks of HPV-related cancers with their patients
The dental community is working to strengthen HPV prevention efforts, helping reduce the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancers. (2018-01-10)

Men with HPV are 20 times more likely to be reinfected after one year
An analysis of HPV in men shows that infection with one type strongly increased the risk of reinfection of the same type. The study highlights the importance of vaccination for preventing the spread of HPV in young men before they become sexually active and in older men who have already contracted the virus. (2017-12-05)

Homemade microscope reveals how a cancer-causing virus clings to our DNA
Using a homemade, high-tech microscope, scientists have revealed how a cancer-causing virus anchors itself to our DNA. That discovery could pave the way for doctors to cure incurable diseases by flushing out viruses, including HPV and Epstein-Barr, that now permanently embed themselves in our cells. (2018-04-19)

Scientists design new skin cell culture technique to study human papillomavirus
A new cell culture strategy promises to illuminate the mysterious early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba and colleagues at Louisiana State University. (2018-03-01)

Sylvester researcher uses HPV vaccine to treat patient with skin cancer
In 2017, a case report by Dr. Anna Nichols showed the HPV vaccine Gardasil reduced the number of new basal and squamous cell skin cancers in two patients. Tim Ioannides, M.D., a voluntary faculty member at UM, suggested using the vaccine as an off-label treatment by directly injecting it into the tumors. (2018-07-03)

Common pain reliever can improve survival in head and neck cancer
Regular use of a common type of medication, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, significantly improves survival for a third or more patients with head and neck cancer, a new study led by UC San Francisco has found. (2019-01-25)

HPV vaccination rates lag for vulnerable population of childhood cancer survivors
Research suggests health providers are key to boosting HPV vaccination rates of childhood cancer survivors, who, as a group, are at increased risk for second cancers associated with the human papillomavirus. (2017-08-24)

Parents see cancer prevention potential as best reason for HPV vaccination
Parents of adolescents believed that the potential to prevent certain types of cancer is the best reason for their children to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, whereas other reasons health care providers often give were far less persuasive. (2018-06-14)

Cervical lesions change fastest in Hispanics, slowest in blacks--for better and worse
Hispanic women progressed the fastest, moving from innocuous to worrisome high-grade lesions within 17.6 months, whereas black women took 27.6 months to reach that critical state. However, Hispanic women recovered faster too, regressing from high-grade to innocuous lesions in 28.1 months. On average black women took 49 months to regress back to the innocuous stage. Progression and regression rates for white and Asian women fell in between, reflecting the patterns upon which current treatment guidelines are based. (2018-01-11)

HPV prevalence rates among US men, vaccination coverage
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, as well as a cause of various cancers, and a new study published online by JAMA Oncology estimates the overall prevalence of genital HPV infection in men ages 18 to 59. (2017-01-19)

Blood test for HPV may help predict risk in cancer patients
Preliminary findings presented at this year's American Society of Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting suggest a genetic test for HPV16 in the blood could be useful to help assess risk for patients, and could help identify patients suitable for lower treatment doses. (2017-10-04)

Women with suspected HPV adverse effects more often suffered from psychiatric disorders
New research from Aarhus University shows that women who are referred to an HPV center more often have had psychiatric medicine prescribed or been hospitalized for psychiatric conditions up to five years before they received the vaccine. (2017-09-28)

No link between HPV vaccination and risk of autoimmune disorders: Study in CMAJ
A new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found no increased risk of autoimmune disorders in girls who received quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination, adding to the body of evidence for the safety of the vaccine. (2018-05-28)

Increased cervical cancer risk in women with positive HPV, but no cellular abnormalities
Researchers have uncovered an increased risk of cervical cancer in women whose cervical cells test positive for certain high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types but do not show any signs of cellular abnormalities. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help refine guidelines for cervical cancer screening. (2018-12-10)

UTHealth study finds that male virgins can still acquire HPV
Men who have never engaged in sexual intercourse are still at risk for acquiring HPV, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Infectious Diseases by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. (2017-12-13)

High-risk sexually transmitted HPV virus associated with increased CVD risk
Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors. In a large study, Korean women with high-risk human papillomavirus were 22 percent more likely than uninfected women to develop cardiovascular disease, after adjusting for other potential risk factors. (2019-02-07)

DNA vaccine leads to immune responses in HPV-related head and neck cancer
A therapeutic vaccine can boost antibodies and T cells, helping them infiltrate tumors and fight off human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania tested the immunotherapy approach in two groups of patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa) and found 86 percent showed elevated T cell activity. (2018-09-21)

New study finds improved vaccine that protects against nine types of HPV
Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with almost 300,000 deaths occurring each year. More than 80 percent of these deaths occur in developing nations. The advent of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has significantly reduced the number of those who develop and die from cervical cancer. And thanks to an international effort to improve the vaccine, the medical community is one step closer to preventing more HPV-associated diseases. (2017-09-06)

Cervical cancer subtype rising in some sub-populations
A new study reports that a type of cervical cancer that is less amenable to Pap testing is increasing in several subpopulations of women, pointing to the growing importance of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and vaccination (2019-04-17)

HPV vaccine effective in youth with kidney disease, but less so in those with a kidney transplant
Following vaccination against human papillomavirus, girls and young women with chronic kidney disease and those on dialysis had antibody levels above the threshold that indicates protection from infection. A significant proportion of patients with kidney transplants showed evidence of an inadequate antibody response to the vaccine. (2016-04-07)

Study links individual HPV types to HIV infection
An international research team led by a UC Riverside scientist has for the first time identified individual types of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, that are specifically linked to HIV infection. The study concludes that a person with any HPV type, more than one HPV type, or high-risk HPV is more likely to acquire HIV. The study found the following HPV types are linked to HIV: HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58. (2018-10-05)

HPV may lurk in your throat
URMC researchers found human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical and head and neck cancers, hiding in small pockets on the surface of tonsils. They believe HPV may evade the immune system in this hiding place, allowing the virus to lay in wait for an opportunity to reinstate an infection or invade the tonsil tissue to develop cancer. (2018-01-31)

Does HPV vaccination prevent the development of cervical cancer?
New evidence published today in the Cochrane Library shows that human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines protect against cervical lesions in young women, particularly in those who are vaccinated between the ages of 15 and 26. It also summarizes findings on harms that have been assessed in randomized controlled trials. (2018-05-08)

Neck mass in adults: Guideline for evaluation provides framework for timely diagnosis
With the development of the Clinical Practice Guideline: Evaluation of the Neck Mass in Adults, published today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and presented at the AAO-HNSF 2017 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience in Chicago, Ill., the appropriate testing and physical examination of an adult with a neck mass is addressed, with a specific goal to reduce delays in diagnosis of malignant disease and to optimize outcomes. (2017-09-10)

Teenaged girls did not engage in riskier sexual behavior after HPV vaccination introduced in school
Despite fears to the contrary, sexual behaviors of adolescent girls stayed the same or became safer after publicly funded school-based HPV vaccinations were introduced in British Columbia (BC), according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-10-15)

Anal cancer rates and mortality have risen dramatically among Americans
Rates of new anal cancer diagnoses and deaths related to human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection, have increased dramatically over the last 15 years, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The results of their study were published in the November issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2019-11-19)

HPV jab means women only need 3 cervical screens in a lifetime
Women may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Cancer today. (2017-11-09)

Two types of HPV linked to cervical cancer have declined since the advent of the HPV vaccine
An analysis of cervical precancers over a period of seven years showed that two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) that have been targeted by vaccination since 2006 have declined, accounting for a smaller proportion of cervical disease. The study offers evidence that HPV vaccination reduced the incidence of infections that can lead to cervical cancer. (2019-02-21)

HPV vaccine also prevents uncommon childhood respiratory disease, study suggests
The vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. (2017-11-09)

Encouraging results from vaccine trial to reduce cervical cancer
A randomised trial in this week's issue of The Lancet shows how a vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection could potentially reduce the global incidence of cervical cancer. (2004-11-11)

New study measures the impact of text message reminders on HPV vaccine series completion
Text message vaccine reminders are effective, but less is known about the effects across a population. (2019-04-27)

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