Popular Hydraulic Fracturing News and Current Events

Popular Hydraulic Fracturing News and Current Events, Hydraulic Fracturing News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 16 | 639 Results
How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste
Study explains how radioactive radium transfers to wastewater in the widely-used method to extract oil and gas. (2018-09-18)

Radar images show large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming rates
Radar satellite images show a large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming rates, according to a geophysical team from Southern Methodist University. Analysis of the images with oil activity data from the Texas Railroad Commission suggests decades of oil activity have destabilized localities of the 4,000-square-mile area, which is populated by small towns, roadways and a vast network of oil and gas pipelines and storage tanks. (2018-03-21)

Public holds polarized views about climate change and trust in climate scientists
There are gaping divisions in Americans' views across every dimension of the climate debate, including causes and cures for climate change and trust in climate scientists and their research, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. (2016-10-04)

Geosciences-inspired engineering
The Mackenzie Dike Swarm and the roughly 120 other known giant dike swarms located across the planet may also provide useful information about efficient extraction of oil and natural gas in today's modern world. To explore how naturally occurring dike swarms can lead to improved methods of oil and gas reservoir stimulation, the National Science Foundation Division of Earth Sciences awarded a $310,000 award to Andrew Bunger at Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering. (2017-01-19)

Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health
Health risks increase for infants born to mothers living within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site, according to a study published Dec. 13 in Science Advances. (2017-12-13)

New lithium collection method could boost global supply
With continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a University of Texas at Austin professor and his research team may have a solution. (2018-02-09)

Filter may be a match for fracking water
A superhydrophilic filter produced by Rice University scientists has proven able to remove more than 90 percent of contaminants from water used in hydraulic fracturing operations at shale oil and gas wells. (2017-09-25)

Exposure to benzene during pregnancy: a pilot study raises concerns in British Columbia
Université de Montréal research reveals that 29 pregnant women living near natural-gas hydraulic fracturing sites had a median concentration of a benzene biomarker in their urine that was 3.5 times higher than that found in women from the general Canadian population. (2017-11-13)

Aerial imagery gives insight into water trends
USU researchers say aerial images taken from drones or helicopters are just as accurate as more conventional field methods used for estimating river discharge. (2018-02-09)

Fracking likely to result in high emissions
Natural gas releases fewer greenhouse gases than other fossil fuels. That's why it is often seen as a bridge technology to a low-carbon future. A study by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has estimated emissions from shale gas production through fracking in Germany and the UK. It shows that CO2-eq. emissions would exceed the estimated current emissions from conventional gas production in Germany. The potential risks make strict adherence to environmental standards vital. (2019-07-25)

Fracking the immune system
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life. (2018-05-01)

NREL, Johns Hopkins develop method to quantify life cycle land use of natural gas
A case study of the Barnett Shale region in Texas, where hydraulic fracturing was first implemented, for the first time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from natural gas based on physical measurements instead of using assumptions and averages that were previously used for evaluation. (2017-10-03)

New water-quality data on impact of corn, soybeans on nitrate in Iowa streams
As Iowa farmers have planted more acres of corn to meet the demand driven by the corn-based ethanol industry, many models predicted that nitrate concentrations in Iowa streams would increase accordingly. However, recent University of Iowa research based on water monitoring and published in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation casts doubt on these predictions. (2016-05-24)

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener engines
Technology developed at the University of Waterloo reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent. (2018-03-21)

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions
A collaboration between Nagoya University and TU Braunschweig finds evidence that when projectiles hit soft clumps of dust or hard clumps of loose glass beads, the scaling laws for energy dissipation and energy transfer are the same in each case. This helps us understand how granular clumps stick together, and how planets are formed. (2018-11-16)

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on Mars
As Curiosity rover marches across Mars, the red planet's watery past comes into clearer focus. (2018-04-19)

Swansea University research helps break ground to clean up land
Researchers at Swansea University's Complex Flow Lab have been exploring the intricate shapes that emerge when air is injected into soil. Published in Physical Review Applied, these findings could one day be used to speed up the decontamination of industrial brownfield sites?which the United Kingdom currently has over 400,000 hectares of. (2018-01-22)

UTA partners with Apache Corp. for baseline water quality study in Alpine High area
Chemists from the University of Texas at Arlington have partnered with Apache Corporation to conduct a baseline water quality study of groundwater and surface water in the newly discovered Alpine High resource play in West Texas. (2016-10-12)

Observing hydrogen's effects in metal
Microscopy technique could help researchers design safer reactor vessels or hydrogen storage tanks. (2019-02-05)

University of Florids, US Army develop model for lighter armor
The US Army Research Laboratory is working on developing new light-weight ceramic materials that resist fracture, and has teamed with researchers from the University of Florida to better understand exactly how these materials, which are suited for Soldier personal protection and Army systems, fracture, and how they can be further improved. They are focusing on failure through cracking; the material eventually disintegrates into a granular-like state through a process called comminution. (2017-08-17)

Russian researchers developed high-pressure natural gas operating turbine-generator
Scientists of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) developed turbo expander electric generator operating on high-pressure natural gas. Natural gas being compressed at the power station releases a large amount of thermal energy into the environment. Widespread usage of this type of energy, called derived, may become a huge step towards sustainable energy. (2017-02-03)

Trading farmland for nitrogen protection
Excess nitrogen from agricultural runoff can enter surface waters with devastating effects. Algal blooms and fish kills are a just a couple of possible consequences. But riparian buffer zones -- areas of grasses, perennials, or trees -- between farmlands and streams or rivers can help. (2016-08-03)

The potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on streams
Concerns over hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas extraction method that injects millions of gallons of freshwater and chemicals into shale, have largely focused on potential impacts on water quality. But, as scientists report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, 'fracking' operations could have impacts on water quantity because they are withdrawing these large amounts of water from nearby streams, which house aquatic ecosystems and are used by people for drinking and recreation. (2018-01-31)

Unconventional: The Development of Natural Gas from the Marcellus Shale
Shale gas has changed thinking about fossil energy supplies worldwide, but the development of these resources has been controversial. Activists have made claims that hydraulic fracturing may contribute to climate change, threaten groundwater resources, and pose risks to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and human health. (2017-03-14)

New map profiles induced earthquake risk for West Texas
A map created by Stanford geophysicists can help predict which parts of West Texas and New Mexico may be at risk of fracking-induced earthquakes. The map could guide oil discovery efforts in the region. (2018-02-08)

Impacts of local exposure to fracking sites on Pennsylvania infants
Based on a decade of data from Pennsylvania, researchers report that babies born to mothers living within 1 kilometer of active 'fracking' wells are 25 percent more likely to exhibit low birth weight -- a risk factor for infant mortality, ADHD, asthma, and other negative outcomes. The results reflect a possible health consequence of exposure to fracking pollutants. To date, (2017-12-13)

Data-driven shale dialogue
Research published in the journal Science examines a dialogue about shale drilling between concerned citizens, watershed groups, government regulators and personnel from large energy companies by focusing on publicly available water quality data. (2018-02-06)

Study finds no evidence of natural gas from fracking in Ohio drinking water
A study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling. Geologists with the University of Cincinnati examined drinking water in northeast Ohio where many residents rely on water from private underground wells. The time-series study was the first of its kind in Ohio. (2018-05-18)

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes linked with shale oil, gas
Nutrient-rich ash from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs' reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana. (2018-03-13)

Man-made earthquake risk reduced if fracking is 895m from faults
The risk of man-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth's crust, according to new research. (2018-02-27)

Does living near an oil or natural gas well affect your drinking water?
Does living near an oil or natural gas well affect the quality of your drinking water? 'The answer to that question is usually 'no,' but there are exceptions,' said Stanford Professor Rob Jackson. He has found very high levels of natural gas in the tap water near active wells, and a surprising number of hydraulically fractured wells that penetrate shallow freshwater aquifers. 'In no other industry would you be allowed to inject chemicals into a source of drinking-quality water,' Jackson said. (2016-02-14)

USGS estimates 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas' Eagle Ford Group
The Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey. This estimate consists of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources in continuous accumulations. (2018-06-22)

When oil and water mix
Hydraulic fracturing of organic-rich shales has become a major industry. The commonly used term for this extraction of hydrocarbons -- fracking -- is especially intriguing. Not only does it convey the process of breaking apart rocks, but the dividing of public opinion. Fracking is simultaneously hyped as a boon to the economy and a disaster to the environment. (2018-07-03)

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell development
Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a Duke-led study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred through PPARy-dependent and independent mechanisms. More research is needed to assess potential health impacts outside the laboratory. (2018-06-21)

Fracking tied to reduced songbird nesting success
The central Appalachian region is experiencing the country's most rapid growth in shale gas development, or 'fracking,' but we've known almost nothing about how this is affecting the region's songbird populations -- until now. A new study demonstrates that the nesting success of the Louisiana waterthrush -- a habitat specialist that nests along forested streams, where the potential for habitat degradation is high -- is declining at sites impacted by shale gas development in northwestern West Virginia. (2018-02-14)

Anticipating hazards from fracking-induced earthquakes in Canada and US
As hydraulic fracturing operations expand in Canada and in some parts of the United States, researchers at the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual Meeting are taking a closer look at ways to minimize hazards from the earthquakes triggered by those operations. (2017-04-12)

Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The CSU team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study, published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, showed that these crops had weakened immune systems. (2019-10-31)

Increasing tree mortality in a warming world
A mix of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics, where trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago. (2018-03-09)

Database of earthquakes triggered by human activity is growing -- with some surprises
The Human-Induced Earthquake Database (HiQuake), the world's most complete database of earthquake sequences proposed to have been triggered by human activity, now includes approximately 730 entries, according to a report published Oct. 4 in the 'Data Mine' column of the journal Seismological Research Letters. (2017-09-28)

Water users associations approve remote control watering systems
Researchers at the University of Cordoba assess the success or failure of installing remote control systems and data measuring in water users associations. (2018-06-08)

Page 1 of 16 | 639 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.