Popular Hydrogel News and Current Events

Popular Hydrogel News and Current Events, Hydrogel News Articles.
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Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease. (2019-02-08)

Better, cheaper bio-ink may be used to create artificial organs
A new bio-ink that may support a more efficient and inexpensive fabrication of human tissues and organs has been created by researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus. The UBC team analyzed the physical and biological properties of three different GelMA hydrogels -- porcine skin, cold-water fish skin and cold-soluble gelatin. (2017-09-13)

A painless adhesive
Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers from Harvard and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials -- such as hydrogel and living tissue -- and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light. The adhesives could be used to attach and painlessly detach wound dressings, transdermal drug delivery devices, and wearable robotics. (2018-12-14)

The future of sutures and staples: A sealant inspired by slugs
A new Clinical Implications of Basic Research paper highlights a novel surgical adhesive on the horizon. (2017-11-22)

Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath
Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack. (2019-04-17)

After the heart attack: Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure (video)
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells in the heart. But damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. These changes can cause heart failure. Scientists now report they have developed injectable gels to prevent this damage. They present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2016-08-22)

Rutgers engineers 3-D print shape-shifting smart gel
Rutgers engineers have invented a '4-D printing' method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of 'living' structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery. (2018-01-31)

Implantable sensor relays real-time personal health data to a cell phone
Personalized medicine is one step closer thanks to tiny, implantable sensors that can send data to a computer or cell phone to give early warning of a person's developing health problems. Future versions of these devices could indicate the most effective type of exercise for an individual athlete, or help in the triage of wounded soldiers. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-19)

3-D printing creates super soft structures that replicate brain and lungs
A new 3-D printing technique allows researchers to replicate biological structures, which could be used for tissue regeneration and replica organs. (2018-01-10)

Rice U. lab surprised to find its drug-delivery system can help even without drugs
A synthetic, injectable hydrogel developed at Rice University to deliver drugs and encourage tissue growth turns out to have therapeutic properties all its own. (2018-03-13)

McMaster University engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordable
McMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public. (2018-02-09)

Electronic skin stretched to new limits
A metal carbide within a hydrogel composite senses, stretches and heals like human skin for use in medicine and robotics. (2018-06-15)

Using seaweed to kill invasive ants
Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have developed an inexpensive, biodegradable, seaweed-based ant bait that can help homeowners and farmers control invasive Argentine ant populations. (2017-05-18)

'Heart-on-a-chip' process aims to speed up drug testing
Testing new clinical drugs' effect on heart tissue could become quicker and more straightforward, thanks to new research from Harvard University. The study, published today in the journal Biofabrication, sets out a new, faster method for manufacturing a 'heart-on-a-chip,' which can be used to test the reaction of heart tissue to external stimuli. (2018-01-16)

Transparent gel-based robots can catch and release live fish
Engineers at MIT have fabricated transparent, gel-based robots that move when water is pumped in and out of them. The bots can perform a number of fast, forceful tasks, including kicking a ball underwater, and grabbing and releasing a live fish. (2017-02-01)

Measuring stress around cells
Tissues and organs in the human body are shaped through forces generated by cells, that push and pull, to ''sculpt'' biological structures. Thanks to a new tool developed at McGill University, scientists will now be able to watch, and map these forces. (2019-01-30)

Growth factor gradients in migration-permissive hydrogels for salivary gland assembly
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Kelsea Marie Hubka, a Rice University graduate student and visiting student at University of Texas Health Science Center School of Dentistry, Houston, Texas, presented a poster titled 'Growth Factor Gradients in Migration-Permissive Hydrogels for Salivary Gland Assembly.' (2018-03-22)

Mimicking biological process, hydrogel signals and releases proteins
An artificial system using a DNA-laced hydrogel can receive a chemical signal and release the appropriate protein, according to Penn State researchers. Further stimulation by the chemical signal continues to trigger a response. (2017-10-25)

Sclerosing agent delivery improvements to protect against malignant pleural effusion
Preclinical trials were held on mice. Senior Research Associate Alexander Deneka (Laboratory of Molecular and Biochemical Bases of Pathogenesis and Therapy of Cancer Diseases, Kazan Federal University) explains that the method in question was first proposed by British scientists; they proved that liquid can be drained from a pleural cavity with the help of a talcum powder solution. (2019-07-25)

Lightweight catalyst for artificial photosynthesis
Nanochemistry meets macrostructures: Chinese scientists report the synthesis of a macroscopic aerogel from carbonitride nanomaterials which is an excellent catalyst for the water-splitting reaction under visible-light irradiation. The study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie adds new opportunities to the material properties of melamine-derived carbonitrides. (2017-08-04)

Researchers report first-ever protein hydrogels made in living cells
Johns Hopkins cell biologists report what they believe is the first-ever creation of tiny protein-based gelatin-like clumps called hydrogels inside living cells. The ability to create hydrogels on demand, they say, should advance the long scientific struggle to study the elusive structures -- which form in nature when proteins or other molecules aggregate under certain conditions -- and to uncover their suspected contributions to human diseases. (2017-11-06)

Energized fabrics could keep soldiers warm and battle-ready in frigid climates
Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating, while hands and feet can grow numb. To keep military personnel more comfortable, scientists are trying to create high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and that capture sweat. These fabrics could conceivably be used in future consumer clothing. The researchers will present their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-20)

Slow-release hydrogel aids immunotherapy for cancer
An immunotherapy drug embedded in a slow-release hydrogel invented at Rice University in collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston appears to be highly effective at killing cancer cells. (2018-03-07)

Rutgers researchers create a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater, moves objects
Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them. The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases, detecting and delivering drugs and performing underwater inspections. (2018-05-18)

Researchers reduce expensive noble metals for fuel cell reactions
Washington State University researchers have developed a novel nanomaterial that could improve the performance and lower the costs of fuel cells by using fewer precious metals like platinum or palladium. (2016-08-22)

Researchers create new 'smart' material with potential biomedical, environmental uses
By combining seaweed-derived alginate with the nanomaterial graphene oxide, Brown University researchers have developed a new material that's durable and can respond dynamically to its environment. (2018-11-21)

Flare-responsive hydrogel developed to treat arthritis
BWH bioengineers and physicians team up to develop a better delivery system for getting anti-inflammatory therapies to the sites where they are needed most. (2018-04-03)

Engineered cartilage template to heal broken bones
A team of UConn Health researchers has designed a novel, hybrid hydrogel system to help address some of the challenges in repairing bone in the event of injury. The researchers described their findings in a recent issue of Journal of Biomedical Materials Research-Part B, where the work is featured on the journal cover. (2018-03-08)

New glaucoma treatment could ease symptoms while you sleep
Eye drops developed by UBC researchers could one day treat glaucoma while you sleep -- helping to heal a condition that is one of the leading causes of blindness around the world. (2018-04-11)

First 3D-printed human corneas
The first human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University, UK. (2018-05-29)

New gel for liver cell culture on microchips
Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a new method to produce hydrated materials, hydrogels, that have properties similar to the natural environment of cells in the body. They describe in an article in Biofabrication how to adapt the material to the various requirements of difficult-to-culture cell types, and to produce organ-like structures on a microchip. (2019-02-12)

Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments
A 3D hydrogel created by researchers at U of T Engineering is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers. (2019-02-25)

Self-watering soil could transform farming
A new type of soil created by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin can pull water from the air and distribute it to plants, potentially expanding the map of farmable land around the globe to previously inhospitable places and reducing water use in agriculture at a time of growing droughts. (2020-11-02)

New wrapping material enables high quality bioimaging
A nanosheet made of organic polymers has been developed to prevent the drying and deforming of biological samples, thus enabling high-quality imaging under microscopes. (2017-08-25)

Kevlar-based artificial cartilage mimics the magic of the real thing
The unparalleled liquid strength of cartilage, which is about 80 percent water, withstands some of the toughest forces on our bodies. (2017-11-15)

Combating eye injuries with a reversible superglue seal
A team of scientists and engineers at USC has developed a reversible, on-the-spot, temperature-sensitive gel that could seal eye injuries on the battlefield. (2017-12-06)

3-D-printable implants may ease damaged knees
A cartilage-mimicking material created by researchers at Duke University may allow surgeons to 3-D print knee menisci or other replacement parts that are custom-shaped to each patient's anatomy. The hydrogel-based material is the first to match human cartilage in strength and elasticity while also remaining 3-D-printable and stable inside the body. (2017-04-19)

How breast tissue stiffening promotes breast cancer development
By examining how mammary cells respond in a stiffness-changing hydrogel, researchers discovered that several pathways work together to signal breast cells to turn cancerous. The work could inspire new approaches to treating patients and inhibiting tumor growth. (2019-02-12)

A starch and graphene hydrogel geared towards electrodes for brain implants is developed
The Materials + Technology research group at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering -- Gipuzkoa has, in collaboration with the University of Strasbourg, developed some hydrogels with potential biomedical applications. Starch was used as the raw material and a three-dimensional network structure was produced. When graphene and salvia extracts were added, the hydrogel was provided with electrical properties as well as the necessary antibacterial ones. (2018-11-27)

Wood to supercapacitors
Carbon aerogels are ultralight, conductive materials, which are extensively investigated for applications in supercapacitor electrodes in electrical cars and cell phones. Chinese scientists have now found a way to make these electrodes sustainably. The aerogels can be obtained directly from cellulose nanofibrils, the abundant cell-wall material in wood, finds the study reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2018-05-24)

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