Popular Hypertension News and Current Events

Popular Hypertension News and Current Events, Hypertension News Articles.
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Poor sleep hastens progression of kidney disease
People with chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable to the deleterious effects of poor sleep, according to a new paper published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2017-09-14)

Heating pads may lower blood pressure in people with high blood pressure when lying down
In people with supine hypertension due to autonomic failure, a condition that increases blood pressure when lying down, overnight heat therapy significantly decreased systolic blood pressure compared to a placebo. Heat therapy may be an innovative, non-pharmacologic approach to treat the overnight high blood pressure in these patients. (2019-09-06)

Here's something that will raise your blood pressure
The apelin receptor (APJ) has been presumed to play an important role in the contraction of blood vessels involved in blood pressure regulation. A University of Tsukuba-led research team found that APJ was closely associated with hypertension through effects on vascular smooth muscle cells in laboratory mice. In addition, APJ worked synergistically with the α1A-adrenergic receptor to cause vasoconstriction. These results may help to understand blood pressure regulation and support therapies for vascular diseases. (2019-11-01)

Zinc deficiency may play a role in high blood pressure
Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Renal Physiology. (2019-01-24)

Why do we develop high blood pressure?
Abnormally high blood pressure, or hypertension, may be related to changes in brain activity and blood flow early in life. That's according to a study conducted on a rat model of high blood pressure, published in Experimental Physiology. (2017-03-09)

Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer's disease: A new therapeutic opportunity?
Currently, no possibility exists to reliably quantify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset in the general population and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. (2017-08-02)

Do you really have high blood pressure?
A study by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) shows that more than half of family doctors in Canada are still using manual devices to measure blood pressure, a dated technology that often leads to misdiagnosis. (2017-03-20)

Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure control
Primary care leadership and practice resilience can strengthen organizational culture. In small primary care practices, however, practice adaptive reserve and leadership capability are not associated with baseline blood pressure control. (2018-04-09)

Breastfeeding reduces hypertension risk
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause. This is less true of obese women, however. (2018-01-30)

Americans are getting heart-healthier: Coronary heart disease decreasing in the US
Coronary heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. A new study evaluating recent trends in the prevalence of CHD in the US population aged 40 years and older showed that CHD rates have decreased significantly, from 10.3 percent in 2001-2002 to 8.0 percent in 2011-2012. These results are reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2016-06-14)

Trains, planes, automobiles and heart disease
Noise may disrupt the body on the cellular level in a way that increases the risk of common heart disease risk factors, according to a review topic published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the underlying mechanisms that may lead to noise-induced heart disease. The review is in response to growing evidence connecting environmental noise, including from road traffic and aircrafts, to the development of heart disease, such as coronary artery disease, arterial hypertension, stroke and heart failure. (2018-02-05)

Time to reassess blood-pressure goals
High blood pressure or hypertension is a major health problem that affects more than 70 million people in the US, and over one billion worldwide. Despite being a critically important risk factor for heart and kidney disease, defining the 'optimal' blood pressure has been a challenge. (2015-11-09)

Research reveals risk factors for urgency urinary incontinence
In a large representative British population of individuals in their late 60s, the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 15 percent in men and 54 percent in women. (2018-03-07)

$9.4 million grant helps scientists explore how cell death from high blood pressure fuels even higher pressure
It's been known for decades that a bacterial infection can raise your blood pressure short term, but now scientists are putting together the pieces of how our own dying cells can fuel chronically high, destructive pressure. (2017-02-09)

FDA approves Bystolic, a novel beta blocker
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Bystolic (nebivolol) for the treatment of hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Bystolic works differently than many older beta blockers in that it is preferentially beta 1 selective at doses less than or equal to 10 mg, meaning it selectively blocks the effects of adrenaline at the heart. In addition, Bystolic vasodilates -- or widens and expands -- the blood vessels. (2007-12-18)

Popular blood pressure medicine linked with increased risk of skin cancer
Recently published research from the University of Southern Denmark and the Danish Cancer Society shows a connection between one of the most common medications for hypertension and skin cancer. (2017-12-04)

Renal hemodynamics and cardiovascular function in health and disease
The SRC will focus on unpublished work that is state-of-the-art in study of cardiovascular and renal disease and hypertension. (2016-01-28)

Feeling the pressure: How blood vessels sense their environment
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that Thbs1 is a key extracellular mediator of mechanotransduction upon mechanical stress. Using a mice model of pressure overload, they showed that mice lacking Thbs1 are less likely to withstand high mechanical stress. These findings help understand the biomechanical impact of cardiovascular diseases. (2020-04-24)

Sleep apnea and insomnia in African-Americans goes undiagnosed
African-Americans with sleep apnea and insomnia are rarely diagnosed with either problem, even when the severity of the two sleep disorders are likely to affect their health, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference. (2017-05-22)

Hypertension during pregnancy may affect women's long-term cardiovascular health
Women who experience hypertension during pregnancy face an increased risk of heart disease and hypertension later in life, according to a new study. (2017-08-18)

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart rate
People with obesity are more likely to develop a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to Penn State researchers. They found that people with obesity had a 40 percent higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation than people without obesity. (2018-04-18)

Pregnant Asian women who develop high blood pressure at highest risk for heart failure hospitalization
Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problems within a few years of giving birth, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-14)

ADHD medication linked to slightly increased risk of heart rhythm problems
Use of methylphenidate in children and young people with ADHD is associated with a slightly increased risk of abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) shortly after the start of treatment, suggests research published by The BMJ today. (2016-05-31)

New tool to improve blood pressure measurement
Oxford University researchers have developed a prediction model that uses three separate blood pressure readings taken in a single consultation and basic patient characteristics to give an adjusted blood pressure reading that is significantly more accurate than existing models for identifying hypertension. (2016-03-21)

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension
Nearly half of all advanced-stage lung cancer patients develop arterial pulmonary hypertension. (2017-11-22)

Severe pre-eclampsia often leads to undetected high blood pressure after pregnancy
Hypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. The lingering hypertension may go unnoticed because it often doesn't present as classic high readings in the doctor's office. Offering post-pregnancy ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to all women who have severe pre-eclampsia may help detect those whose blood pressures might be high despite normal readings in doctors' offices. (2018-02-05)

Climb stairs to lower blood pressure and strengthen leg muscles
If you don't have the time or money for aerobic and resistance training, why not try climbing the stairs? A new study demonstrates that stair climbing not only lowers blood pressure but also builds leg strength, especially in postmenopausal women with estrogen deficiencies who are more susceptible to vascular and muscle problems. The study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2018-02-14)

Low sodium-DASH diet combination dramatically lowers blood pressure in hypertensive adults
A combination of reduced sodium intake and the DASH diet lowers blood pressure in adults with hypertension, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-12)

Vitamin D levels in the blood linked to cardiorespiratory fitness
Vitamin D levels in the blood are linked to cardiorespiratory fitness, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a publication of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2018-10-30)

Dementia can be caused by hypertension
A new study in Cardiovascular Research indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur. (2018-06-13)

Sleep apnea may increase atrial fibrillation risk
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference. (2017-05-22)

With help from pharmacists, better blood pressure costs $22
A pharmacist-physician collaboration in primary-care offices effectively and inexpensively improved patients' high blood pressure. The cost to increase the rate of hypertension control by 1 percent was $22. Collaborative efforts to help manage blood pressure could be especially useful in low-income areas. (2015-11-02)

Arm cuff blood pressure measurements may fall short for predicting heart disease risk in some people with resistant high blood pressure
A measurement of central blood pressure in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure could help reduce risk of heart disease better than traditional arm cuff readings for some patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions. (2019-09-07)

Fatty liver linked to increased risk of diabetic kidney disease
For patients with type 2 diabetes, a condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease may be an important risk factor for diabetes-related chronic kidney disease, according to a study in the August Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2008-05-29)

New meta-analysis: Recreational football is broad-spectrum medicine
The most popular sport in the world is much more than entertainment: football is broad-spectrum medicine against lifestyle diseases. A new meta-analysis of 31 scientific studies provides strong evidence that short-term football training improves aerobic fitness, blood pressure, resting heart rate, fat percentage, LDL cholesterol and muscle strength for several patient groups. (2018-01-24)

ATS publishes new clinical guideline on home oxygen for children
The American Thoracic Society has developed a new clinical practice guideline for home oxygen therapy for children. The guideline appears in the Feb. 1 edition of the Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-02-01)

Uterine cancer survivors are more likely to have cardiovascular problems
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that survivors of uterine cancer are more likely to experience cardiovascular problems years after treatment. (2018-05-08)

Hormone imbalance causes treatment-resistant hypertension
British researchers have discovered a hormone imbalance that explains why it is very difficult to control blood pressure in around 10 per cent of hypertension patients. (2018-04-11)

Brain blood flow sensor discovery could aid treatments for high blood pressure & dementia
A study led by researchers at UCL has discovered the mechanism that allows the brain to monitor its own blood supply, a finding in rats which may help to find new treatments for human conditions including hypertension (high blood pressure) and dementia. (2020-01-14)

Novel diagnosis of preeclampsia with proteomic analysis
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that analyzing proteins in urine is a simple and objective method to diagnose and classify preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy causing high blood pressure after 20 weeks of gestation. (2006-02-03)

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