Popular Ice Cores News and Current Events

Popular Ice Cores News and Current Events, Ice Cores News Articles.
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Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. But Earth has been ice-free for about 75 percent of the time since complex life first appeared. This variation in background climate, between partly glaciated and ice-free, has puzzled geologists for decades. (2019-03-14)

Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers in West Antarctica are moving more quickly from land into the ocean, contributing to rising global sea levels. A 25-year record of satellite observations has been used to show widespread increases in ice speed across the Getz sector for the first time, with some ice accelerating into the ocean by nearly 50%. (2021-02-23)

'Problem of missing ice' finally solved by movement of the earth's crust
An international team of scientists published a study in Nature Communications today. This new reconstruction revolutionizes what is thought about the global continental ice mass during the Last Ice Age. (2021-02-23)

'Missing ice problem' finally solved
During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers. (2021-02-23)

Alaska thunderstorms may triple with climate change
Warming temperatures will potentially alter the climate in Alaska so profoundly later this century that the number of thunderstorms will triple, increasing the risks of widespread flash flooding, landslides, and lightning-induced wildfires, new research finds. (2021-02-23)

Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska's most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. (2017-01-18)

NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflake
NASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. Developed by scientist Jussi Leinonen of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow -- the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs -- and could be a step toward improving predictions of this hazard. (2018-03-29)

First evidence of under-ice volcanic eruption in Antarctica
The first evidence of a volcanic eruption from beneath Antarctica's most rapidly changing ice sheet is reported this week in the journal Nature Geosciences. The volcano on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet erupted 2,000 years ago and remains active. Using airborne ice-sounding radar, scientists from British Antarctic Survey discovered a layer of ash produced by a (2008-01-20)

Scientists core into California's Clear Lake to explore past climate change
One of the oldest lakes in the world, Clear Lake in northern California has deep sediments that contain a record of the climate and local plants and animals going back perhaps 500,000 years. UC Berkeley scientists are drilling cores from the sediments to explore 130,000 years of this history and fine-tune models for predicting the fate of today's flora and fauna in the face of global warming and pressure from a growing human population. (2012-05-03)

The long memory of the Pacific Ocean
Cold waters that sank in polar regions hundreds of years ago during the Little Ice Age are still impacting deep Pacific Ocean temperature trends. While the deep Pacific temperature trends are small, they represent a large amount of energy in the Earth system. (2019-01-04)

Arctic sea ice thinning at record rate
The thickness of sea ice in large parts of the Arctic declined by as much as 19 percent last winter compared to the previous five winters, according to data from ESA's Envisat satellite. (2008-10-28)

Mysterious climate change
New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past. An international team with the participation of the University of Bonn has shown that the seasonal growth and destruction of sea ice in a warming world increases the biological productivity of the seas around Antarctica by extracting carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in the deep ocean. (2020-06-22)

New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)

Mars is emerging from an ice age
Radar measurements of Mars' polar ice caps reveal that the mostly dry, dusty planet is emerging from an ice age, following multiple rounds of climate change. (2016-05-26)

In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil
In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts. (2018-01-05)

Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)

Sea floor uplift after last ice age causes methane release in the Arctic today
Present-day release of methane from an area of the Arctic Ocean is an effect of the uplift of the sea floor, rather than anthropogenic ocean warming, a new study in Nature Communications states. (2018-02-06)

Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean
Quantitative analysis has evidenced the acceleration system of melting ice: dark water surfaces absorb more heat than white ice surfaces, thus melting ice and making more water surfaces in the Arctic Ocean. (2017-09-06)

Tidewater glaciers: Melting underwater far faster than previously estimated?
A tidewater glacier in Alaska is melting underwater at rates upwards of two orders of magnitude greater than what is currently estimated, sonar surveys reveal. (2019-07-25)

How the brain might compensate stress during learning
When people have to assess a situation within seconds, it helps them to draw on learned categories. Psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum examined with the help of electroencephalography (EEG) how well category-learning works in a stressful episode. They published their research on a mechanism, the brain may compensate stress with, in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. (2018-03-08)

Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakaway
Since an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month, scientists have continued to track its progress using satellites. Their observations show the Larsen-C story might not be over yet. (2017-08-02)

Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on record
Sea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA. (2018-03-23)

World's largest volcanic range may lurk beneath Antarctic ice
West Antarctica's vast ice sheet conceals what may be the largest volcanic region on earth, research has revealed. (2017-08-14)

The drought that collapsed classic Maya society
A period of severe drought near the end of the 1st millennium C.E. likely sealed the fate of Lowland Classic Maya society, and a new study shows just how dry it was as the populations of the Maya Lowlands began to evaporate. (2018-08-02)

Why are there different 'flavors' of iron around the Solar System?
New work from Carnegie's Stephen Elardo and Anat Shahar shows that interactions between iron and nickel under the extreme pressures and temperatures similar to a planetary interior can help scientists understand the period in our Solar System's youth when planets were forming and their cores were created. (2017-02-20)

Melting of east Antarctic ice sheet could cripple major US cities
Instability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet signals increased risk of rising sea levels. (2017-12-13)

Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland
Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides. (2019-05-08)

The World-record 53.3 Tb/s optical switching capacity for data-center networks
NICT has successfully demonstrated a world-record for switching capacity of 53.3 Tb/s for short-reach data-center networks. This demonstration makes use of spatial division multiplexing (SDM) over multi-core optical fibers (MCFs) and a newly developed high-speed spatial optical switch system, enabling full packet-granularity. (2017-10-06)

Climate variability -- past and future
On the basis of a unique global comparison of data from core samples extracted from the ocean floor and the polar ice sheets, AWI researchers have now demonstrated that, though climate changes have indeed decreased around the globe from glacial to interglacial periods, the difference is by no means as pronounced as previously assumed (Nature advanced online publication). Until now, it was believed that glacial periods were characterised by extreme temperature variability, while interglacial periods were relatively stable. (2018-02-05)

The Transpolar Drift is faltering -- sea ice is now melting before it can leave the nursery
The dramatic loss of ice in the Arctic is influencing sea-ice transport across the Arctic Ocean. As experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research report in a new study, today only 20 percent of the sea ice that forms in the shallow Russian marginal seas of the Arctic Ocean actually reaches the Central Arctic, where it joins the Transpolar Drift; the remaining 80 percent of the young ice melts before it has a chance to leave its 'nursery.' (2019-04-02)

Antarctica: Return of the Weddell polynya supports Kiel climate model
After 40 years, a large ice-free area appears again in the Southern Ocean in mid-winter. (2017-09-29)

Novel hypothesis goes underground to predict future of Greenland ice sheet
The Greenland ice sheet melted a little more easily in the past than it does today because of geological changes, and most of Greenland's ice can be saved from melting if warming is controlled, says a team of Penn State researchers. (2019-02-01)

Antarctic ice loss
Professor Jonathan Bamber at the University of Bristol and colleagues estimated the flux of ice from the ice sheet into the ocean from satellite data that cover 85 percent of Antarctica's coastline. They arrived at a best estimate of a loss of 132 billion tons of ice in 2006 from West Antarctica -- up from about 83 billion tons in 1996 -- and a loss of about 60 billion tons in 2006 from the Antarctic Peninsula. (2008-01-13)

Wandering greenhouse gas
On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains. If this greenhouse gas finds its way into the water, it can also become trapped in the sea ice that forms in these coastal waters. (2018-03-16)

Shedding light on arctic zooplankton in the dark
We know that tiny marine creatures in the Arctic respond to weak light from the Moon or the Northern Lights during the polar night. Now researchers have learned that artificial light from research vessels can also have a negative effect. (2018-02-01)

Antarctica's biodiversity is under threat
A unique international study has debunked the popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in much better ecological shape than the rest of the world. (2017-04-20)

Study shows polar bear metabolic rates are higher than previously predicted
A new study on polar bear metabolism, behavior, and foraging success sheds important light on their energy demands. The study, published in the journal Science, found that polar bears have metabolic rates greater than previously predicted and greater than other terrestrial mammals of similar size. The study reinforces the understanding that polar bears are reliant on a diet of fat-rich seals to survive in the energetically-demanding Arctic. (2018-02-01)

How the Atlantic Ocean became part of the global circulation at a climatic tipping point
A team of scientists, led by Dr Sietske Batenburg at the University of Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences, in close collaboration with German and UK institutions, have discovered that the exchange of water between the North and South Atlantic became significantly larger fifty-nine million years ago. (2018-11-26)

Arctic sea ice annual freeze-up underway
After reaching the second-lowest extent ever recorded last month, sea ice in the Arctic has begun to refreeze in the face of autumn temperatures, closing both the Northern Sea Route and the direct route through the Northwest Passage. (2008-10-03)

New study reveals strong El Niño events cause large changes in Antarctic ice shelves
A new study reveals that strong El Nino events can cause significant ice loss in some Antarctic ice shelves while the opposite may occur during strong La Nina events. (2018-01-08)

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