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Popular Ice Age News and Current Events, Ice Age News Articles.
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Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska's most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. (2017-01-18)
NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflake
NASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. (2018-03-29)
Suffocation risk from small hard sugar balls
The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) assessed the possible health risks of large hard sugar balls back in 2010. (2017-09-18)
New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)
Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakaway
Since an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month, scientists have continued to track its progress using satellites. (2017-08-02)
Small Ontario municipalities least prepared to support aging adults
Small municipalities in Ontario are less likely than larger centres to be able to accommodate the needs of their aging populations, according to a report from the University of Waterloo. (2017-12-21)
Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean
Quantitative analysis has evidenced the acceleration system of melting ice: dark water surfaces absorb more heat than white ice surfaces, thus melting ice and making more water surfaces in the Arctic Ocean. (2017-09-06)
Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on record
Sea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA. (2018-03-23)
In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil
In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts. (2018-01-05)
Sea floor uplift after last ice age causes methane release in the Arctic today
Present-day release of methane from an area of the Arctic Ocean is an effect of the uplift of the sea floor, rather than anthropogenic ocean warming, a new study in Nature Communications states. (2018-02-06)
Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)
How the brain might compensate stress during learning
When people have to assess a situation within seconds, it helps them to draw on learned categories. (2018-03-08)
Mars is emerging from an ice age
Radar measurements of Mars' polar ice caps reveal that the mostly dry, dusty planet is emerging from an ice age, following multiple rounds of climate change. (2016-05-26)
Antarctica: Return of the Weddell polynya supports Kiel climate model
After 40 years, a large ice-free area appears again in the Southern Ocean in mid-winter. (2017-09-29)
Melting of east Antarctic ice sheet could cripple major US cities
Instability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet signals increased risk of rising sea levels. (2017-12-13)
A series of fortunate events
Volcanism is sometimes like food poisoning, where the Earth spews forth unstable material. (2017-11-27)
Freeze and flee: The costly 'escape' response of narwhals
East Greenland narwhals exhibit both 'freeze' and 'flee' responses when escaping from threats, researchers report. (2017-12-07)
Shedding light on arctic zooplankton in the dark
We know that tiny marine creatures in the Arctic respond to weak light from the Moon or the Northern Lights during the polar night. (2018-02-01)
UofL offers vaccine trial for children with relapsed tumors at Kosair Children's Hospital
Children with relapsed tumors and their parents are finding hope in a Phase I research study led by Kenneth G. (2015-07-16)
Academic performance predicts risk of suicide attempt
In a recent Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica study, poor academic performance, measured as grade point average (GPA) at age 16, was a robust and strong predictor of suicide attempt up to middle age. (2017-11-08)
Kids born later in the year can still excel in sport
A child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney. (2018-01-31)
A thermometer for the oceans
The average sea temperature is an essential parameter of the global climate - but it is very difficult to measure. (2018-01-04)
Climate variability -- past and future
On the basis of a unique global comparison of data from core samples extracted from the ocean floor and the polar ice sheets, AWI researchers have now demonstrated that, though climate changes have indeed decreased around the globe from glacial to interglacial periods, the difference is by no means as pronounced as previously assumed (Nature advanced online publication). (2018-02-05)
Study shows polar bear metabolic rates are higher than previously predicted
A new study on polar bear metabolism, behavior, and foraging success sheds important light on their energy demands. (2018-02-01)
Genomic data suggest two main migrations into Scandinavia after the last ice age
In a new study published in PLOS Biology, an international research team suggests Scandinavia was populated by two main migrations after the last glacial maximum: an initial migration of groups from the south (modern day Denmark and Germany) and an additional migration from the north-east, following the ice-free Atlantic coast. (2018-01-09)
Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
New maps of a mountainous landscape under a key glacier in West Antarctica will be a valuable aid in forecasting sea level changes. (2017-11-20)
Wandering greenhouse gas
On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains. (2018-03-16)
Where and why humans made skates out of animal bones
Archaeological evidence shows that bone skates (skates made of animal bones) are the oldest human powered means of transport, dating back to 3000 B.C. (2007-12-23)
Seafloor creatures destroyed by ice action during ice ages
New research by marine scientists at National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOC) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) will mean that text books will have to be rewritten. (2005-10-17)
Hot spot on Enceladus causes plumes
Enceladus, the tiny satellite of Saturn, is colder than ice, but data gathered by the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan has detected a hot spot that could mean there is life in the old moon after all. (2007-12-17)
Human influences challenge penguin populations
Warming in Antarctica, as well as mining, commercial fishing, and oil and gas development at lower latitudes, threaten Penguin populations throughout the Southern Hemishere, according to an assessment published in the July/August 2008 issue of BioScience. (2008-07-01)
New study reveals strong El Niño events cause large changes in Antarctic ice shelves
A new study reveals that strong El Nino events can cause significant ice loss in some Antarctic ice shelves while the opposite may occur during strong La Nina events. (2018-01-08)
SwRI scientists discover evidence of ice age at martian north pole
Using radar data collected by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, a Southwest Research Institute-led team found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars. (2016-05-26)
Ocean floor mud reveals secrets of past European climate
Samples of sediment taken from the ocean floor of the North Atlantic Ocean have given researchers an unprecedented insight into the reasons why Europe's climate has changed over the past 3,000 years. (2017-11-23)
World's largest volcanic range may lurk beneath Antarctic ice
West Antarctica's vast ice sheet conceals what may be the largest volcanic region on earth, research has revealed. (2017-08-14)
Retreat of the ice followed by millennia of methane release
Methane was seeping from the seafloor for thousands of years following the retreat of the Barents Sea ice sheet, shows a groundbreaking new study in Nature Communications. (2016-05-13)
Team led by UCLA astrophysicist observes primitive comet 1.5 billion miles from the sun
Astronomers report a 'special comet' currently beyond Saturn's orbit -- the farthest active inbound comet ever seen, at an extraordinary 1.5 billion miles from the sun. (2017-10-05)
New study identifies thermometer for global ocean
There's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean thanks to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. (2018-01-03)
Research finds link between rainfall and ocean circulation in past and present
Research conducted at The University of Texas at Austin has found that changes in ocean currents in the Atlantic Ocean influence rainfall in the Western Hemisphere, and that these two systems have been linked for thousands of years. (2018-01-26)
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