Popular Image Processing News and Current Events

Popular Image Processing News and Current Events, Image Processing News Articles.
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Automated technique for anime colorization using deep learning
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology, IMAGICA GROUP Inc. and OLM Digital, Inc. report the world's first technique for automatic colorization focused on Japanese anime production. The new technique is expected to promote efficiency and automation in anime production. (2018-11-27)

Easy on the eyes
New computer program uses artificial intelligence to determine what visual neurons like to see. Algorithm generates synthetic images that morph into 'super stimulus' for neurons, removing inherent bias of using natural images to gauge preferences. The approach could shed light on learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders and other neurologic conditions. (2019-05-02)

Machine learning method identifies precancerous colon polyps
A machine learning algorithm helps accurately differentiate benign and premalignant colorectal polyps on CT colonography scans, according to a new study. (2021-02-23)

Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing
An international team of scientists have developed a photonic processor that uses rays of light inside silicon chips to process information much faster than conventional electronic chips. Published in Nature, the breakthrough study was carried out by scientists from EPFL, the Universities of Oxford, M√ľnster, Exeter, Pittsburgh, and IBM Research - Zurich. (2021-01-06)

ORNL researchers design novel method for energy-efficient deep neural networks
Researchers at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed a novel method for more efficiently training large numbers of networks capable of solving complex science problems. Specifically, Mohammed Alawad, Hong-Jun Yoon, and Gina Tourassi of ORNL's Computer Science and Engineering Division, have demonstrated that by converting deep learning neural networks (DNNs) to 'deep spiking' neural networks (DSNNs) they can improve the efficiency of network design and training. (2018-03-14)

NASA spies wind shear still affecting Tropical Storm Nalgae
Tropical Storm Nalgae can't seem to get a break from vertical wind shear. The storm has been dealing with wind shear since it formed and NASA's Terra satellite observed that was still the case on Aug. 4. (2017-08-04)

Learning language
When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research from the University of Delaware shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language. (2019-05-07)

HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact
The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body. Using novel cell culture systems, quantitative image analysis, and computer simulations, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Heidelberg University has now explored how HIV spreads in three-dimensional tissue-like environments. (2019-07-25)

NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah by the tail
Tropical Storm Tapah has a huge 'tail' on NASA satellite imagery. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the northwestern Pacific Ocean storm that revealed a large band of thunderstorms that resemble a large tail. The NASA imagery also indicated that the storm is getting better organized. (2019-09-20)

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays
AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics -- but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. Now, U of T Engineering have designed a new approach: using machine learning to create computer generated X-rays to augment AI training sets. (2018-07-06)

Tropical Depression 11E 'born' with wind shear on satellite imagery
The eleventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season came together on August 4 even though it was being affected by vertical wind shear. (2017-08-04)

Writing away the body image blues
Body dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. Northwestern psychology professor Renee Engeln tested the effect of three specific writing exercises on college women's body satisfaction, along with co-author Natalie G. Stern. (2018-06-21)

NASA-NOAA satellite provides forecasters a view of tropical storm Jerry's structure
Tropical Storm Jerry is the latest in a line of tropical cyclones to develop in the North Atlantic Ocean this season. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and provided forecasters with a view of its structure that helped confirm it was organizing. (2019-09-18)

NASA eyes a comma-shaped Tropical Storm Rina
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Rina and found that the storm has taken on a tight comma-cloud appearance. (2017-11-08)

The brain watched during language learning
Researchers from Nijmegen, the Netherlands, have for the first time captured images of the brain during the initial hours and days of learning a new language. They use an artificial language with real structures to show how new linguistic information is integrated into the same brain areas used for your native language. (2016-06-29)

Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)

Appetizing imagery puts visual perception on fast forward
People rated images containing positive content as fading more smoothly compared with neutral and negative images, even when they faded at the same rate, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2017-10-05)

A world on fire
The world is on fire. Or so it appears in this image from NASA's Worldview. (2018-08-23)

Augmented-reality technology could help treat 'lazy eye'
When signals between the brain and one eye go awry, input from the other eye can become predominant, a condition called amblyopia or 'lazy eye.' New research suggests that people may be able to use wearable augmented-reality technology to reduce this visual discrepancy as they go about everyday activities. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2017-12-05)

Infants recognize foreign languages as a form of communication
Infants recognize that speech in a language not their own is used for communication, finds a new psychology study. The results offer new insights into how language is processed at a young age. (2018-01-24)

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fish
The University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically impossible to achieve without investing enormous resources. (2018-06-20)

Autism breakthrough
Using a visual test that is known to prompt different reactions in autistic and normal brains, Harvard researchers have shown that those differences were associated with a breakdown in the signaling pathway used by GABA, one of the brain's chief inhibitory neurotransmitters. (2015-12-17)

NASA confirms re-discovered IMAGE satellite
The identity of the satellite re-discovered on Jan. 20, 2018, has been confirmed as NASA's IMAGE satellite. (2018-01-31)

Understanding brain activity when you name what you see
Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it. (2019-06-24)

NASA gets 'eyed' by major Hurricane Jose
NASA's Aqua satellite captured clear view of the eye of Hurricane Jose at it moved toward the Leeward Islands and strengthened into a Category 4 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Aqua also analyzed the storm in infrared light showing powerful storms around the center, capable of heavy rainfall. (2017-09-08)

Cocoa bean roasting can preserve both chocolate health benefits, taste
Manipulating the temperature and the length of time under which cocoa beans are roasted can simultaneously preserve and even boost the potency of some bioactive and antioxidant compounds while protecting desired sensory aspects of chocolate, according to Penn State researchers. (2018-04-04)

Tropical Depression 1E dissipates
Tropical Depression 1E or TD1E didn't get far from the time it was born to the time it weakened to a remnant low pressure area along the southwestern coast of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of it remnant clouds. (2016-06-08)

NASA's look at the difference of a few days in the Thomas Fire
What a difference a few days can make in the life cycle of a fire. In this particular case, the Thomas Fire that is ongoing in the Ventura County around (and surrounding) in Southern California. (2017-12-20)

Satellite finds southerly wind shear affecting Tropical Depression Jelawat
Satellite imagery showed that Tropical Depression Jelawat was still dealing with southerly vertical wind shear that was pushing the bulk of its clouds north of its center. (2018-03-27)

Different neural strategies for junior high school male and female English learners
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the neural response of Japanese junior high school students learning English as a second language, while listening to English sentences. More proficient boys showed more activation in parts of the brain associated with grammatical rules (syntax); girls used a wider range of language information, including speech sounds (phonology) and meaning of words and sentences (semantics). These discoveries may help optimize how boys and girls are taught English. (2018-03-23)

A lonely beauty
Beauty, grace, mystery -- this magnificent spiral galaxy has all the qualities of a perfect galactic Valentine. Captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the galaxy NGC 3344 presents itself face-on, allowing astronomers a detailed look at its intricate and elegant structure. And Hubble's ability to observe objects over a wide range of different wavelengths reveals features that would otherwise remain invisible. (2018-02-14)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ava fizzling south of Madagascar
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ava as it continued to move away from southeastern Madagascar and weaken. (2018-01-09)

Unprecedented accuracy in locating brain electrical activity with new device
Researchers at Aalto University in Finland have developed the world's first device designed for mapping the human brain that combines whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. MEG measures the electrical function and MRI visualizes the structure of the brain. The merging of these two technologies will produce unprecedented accuracy in locating brain electrical activity non-invasively. (2012-07-26)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nora become a hurricane
NASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Nora developed an eye as it strengthened into a hurricane north of Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm, formerly named Tropical Cyclone 16P. (2018-03-23)

Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can track and map active neurons as accurately as a human can, but in a fraction of the time. This new technique, based on a deep learning algorithm, addresses a critical roadblock in neuron analysis, allowing researchers to rapidly gather and process neuronal signals for real-time behavioral studies. (2019-04-12)

The 3-D selfie has arrived
Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3-D facial reconstruction from a single 2-D image -- the 3-D selfie. People are queuing up to try it and so far, more than 400,000 users have had a go. (2017-09-26)

Bullies and their victims obsessed with weight-loss
School bullies and their victims are more obsessed with weight-loss than anyone else, according to new research by the University of Warwick. (2017-03-29)

New instrument lets doctors view the entire eye with unprecedented level of detail
Researchers have developed the first instrument that can provide a detailed image of the entire eye that can produce higher quality images than currently available. (2018-01-18)

Footprints of baby planets in a gas disk
A new analysis of the ALMA data for a young star HL Tauri provides yet more firm evidence of baby planets around the star. Researchers uncovered two gaps in the gas disk around HL Tauri. The locations of these gaps in the gas match the locations of gaps in the dust. This discovery supports the idea that planets form in much shorter timescales than previously thought and prompts a reconsideration of alternative planet formation scenarios. (2016-05-24)

People are willing to pay to curate their online social image
Social media provides a new environment that makes it possible to carefully edit the image you want to project of yourself. A study from Lund University in Sweden suggests that many people are prepared to pay to 'filter out' unfavorable information. (2018-03-15)

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