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Popular Infectious Diseases News and Current Events, Infectious Diseases News Articles.
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Advanced genetic screening method may speed vaccine development
Vaccines remain the best line of defense against deadly pathogens and now Kathryn Sykes and Stephen Johnston, researchers at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, along with co-author Michael McGuire from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are using clever functional screening methods to attempt to speed new vaccines into production that are both safer and more potent. (2012-05-09)

27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Media can register now for the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Vienna, Saturday 22 April to Tuesday 25 April 2017. Registration for bona fide journalists is free. The world's leading experts will come together to discuss the latest developments in infectious diseases, infection control and clinical microbiology at the largest, most comprehensive and most influential conference combining these topics (2017-03-01)

Parasite study paves way for therapies to tackle deadly infections
New understanding of a parasite that causes a million cases of disease each year could point towards effective drug treatments. (2017-10-10)

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species
Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows. (2018-04-12)

Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (2018-01-22)

Bacteria in urine doesn't always indicate infection
Doctors should think carefully before testing patients for a urinary tract infection (UTI) to avoid over-diagnosis and unnecessary antibiotic treatment, according to updated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2019-03-21)

Large racial and ethnic disparity in world's most common STI
In a new Johns Hopkins study, researchers have added to evidence that Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), the world's most common curable sexually transmitted infection (STI), disproportionately affects the black community. (2018-03-15)

To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers must fuse climate science and biology
To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers must fuse climate science and biology, according to a Princeton University review. (2017-09-18)

Broadly acting antibodies found in plasma of Ebola survivors
Recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreaks highlight the need for licensed treatments. ZMapp, an experimental therapy, has shown promise in a clinical trial, but targets only one of five known species of Ebola virus. Now NIAID-supported scientists have discovered powerful, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in the blood of EVD survivors. In animal studies, two of these antibodies provided substantial protection against disease caused by the three species known to cause fatal human illness. (2018-07-17)

Chronic pain common in people living with HIV
All people living with HIV should be screened for chronic pain, which affects 39 to 85 percent of people with the condition, recommend new HIVMA guidelines. Those who have chronic pain should be treated using a multidisciplinary approach focused on non-drug options ranging from yoga to physical therapy, note the guidelines. Opioids should never be a first-line treatment. (2017-09-14)

LSTM and Imperial College Researchers design new anti-influenza drugs
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. (2019-01-25)

Gut cells are gatekeepers of infectious brain diseases, study finds
Fresh insights into infectious brain conditions help to explain why some people -- and animals -- are more at risk than others. (2016-12-14)

Measles serious threat for babies, toddlers, unvaccinated youths, ECDC says
The vast majority of measles cases in Europe were reported in unvaccinated patients, and children younger than two years old were at a higher risk of dying from measles than older patients, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (2018-04-20)

Bacterial and host cell proteins interact to regulate Chlamydia's 'exit strategy'
Interactions between Chlamydia trachomatis proteins and host cell proteins help determine whether the bacterium leaves an infected cell via breakdown of the cellular membrane (lysis) or in a membrane-bound package, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens by Phu Hai Nguyen of the National Institutes of Health, US, and colleagues. (2018-03-15)

NIH scientists explore tick salivary glands as tool to study virus transmission, infection
The salivary glands of some tick species could become important research tools for studying how viruses are transmitted from ticks to mammals, and for developing preventive medical countermeasures. Tick salivary glands usually block transmission, but a new study conducted at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH focuses on the role of salivary glands in spreading flaviviruses from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) to mammals. The new study appears in the journal mBio. (2019-01-29)

Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. A report on the findings was published in August in EClinicalMedicine. (2019-09-16)

E. coli's internal bomb may provide novel target for treatment strategy
Bacteria's internal bomb, the so-called toxin-antitoxin (TA) system that is part of the normal bacterial makeup, may be triggered to make bacteria turn on themselves, providing a valuable target for novel antimicrobial approaches in drug design, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (2018-04-20)

New book on Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance from CSHLPress
'Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance' from CSHLPress examines the major classes of antibiotics, together with their modes of action and mechanisms of resistance. Well-established antibiotics (e.g., β-lactams) are covered, as are lesser-used drugs that have garnered recent interest (e.g., polymyxins) and new compounds in the development pipeline. Also examined is how bacteria evolve ways to resist disruptions by modifying the drug or drug target or by controlling access of the drug to the cell. (2016-08-17)

Simple classification can help define and predict limb-threatening diabetic infections
Research groups from Texas, Chicago, Washington State and the Netherlands partnered to publish a landmark study validating the Infectious Disease Society of America's guidelines for the clinical classification of diabetic foot infections. (2007-01-30)

Young doctors working in infectious diseases suffering burnout and bullying
One in five physicians working in medical microbiology and infectious diseases is suffering from burnout, bullying and poor work-life balance. (2017-02-23)

Researchers find mechanism involved in novel drug design with potential to treat tuberculosis
Portuguese researchers successfully used a pioneer method to chemically modify a protein's components with potential medical applications and an impact in the fight against tuberculosis. (2017-10-12)

New global migration mapping to help fight against infectious diseases
Geographers at the University of Southampton have completed a large scale data and mapping project to track the flow of internal human migration in low and middle income countries. (2016-08-22)

Multiple chronic diseases leave patients with adversely high costs
Current strategies for treating patients with several chronic diseases are putting an unnecessary financial burden on countries' health systems and individuals, a global study has found. Experts say that the current clinical practice of tackling each disease in isolation may lead to the prescription of unnecessary medicines, resulting in patient expenses that are disproportionate to the number of conditions they have. (2018-02-07)

Antibiotics still routinely prescribed in the ER for infants with viral lung infections
Despite recommendations first issued more than a decade ago, antibiotics are still routinely prescribed in US emergency rooms for infants with bronchiolitis, a common viral lung infection. Published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the findings highlight a concerning lag in translating evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice and underscore the need to continue educating health care providers and the public about appropriate antibiotic use. (2019-01-17)

Newly described human antibody prevents malaria in mice
Scientists have discovered a human antibody that protected mice from infection with the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The research findings provide the basis for future testing in humans to determine if the antibody can provide short-term protection against malaria, and also may aid in vaccine design. NIAID investigators led the research with colleagues at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Currently, there is no highly effective, long-lasting vaccine to prevent malaria. (2018-03-19)

Poultry consumption, handling are risk factors for antibiotic resistance in humans
Antibiotic use as a livestock growth promoter increases the risk of human antibiotic resistance, a Marshfield Clinic researcher and his colleagues have found. Results of the nearly $1.4 million three-year study, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga., are published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. (2006-10-10)

Discovery could lead to better asthma treatment
Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to improved treatment for asthma sufferers. They have found that blocking a certain signalling molecule can alleviate symptoms such as mucus production, swelling (edema), and constriction of the airways in the lungs. (2016-04-21)

Prions link cholesterol to neurodegeneration
Prion infection of neurons increases the free cholesterol content in cell membranes. A new study published in the online open access journal BMC Biology suggests that disturbances in membrane cholesterol may be the mechanism by which prions cause neurodegeneration and could point to a role for cholesterol in other neurodegenerative diseases. (2008-02-11)

Biofilm buster treats drug-resistant infections
Scientists have created a potent antibacterial agent that killed drug-resistant microbes and even eradicated stubborn pathogens growing in biofilms, which can be 10 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antibiotics than free-living bacteria. (2018-01-10)

Study explores new strategy to develop a malaria vaccine
A serum developed by Yale researchers reduces infection from malaria in mice, according to a new study. It works by attacking a protein in the saliva of the mosquitoes infected with the malaria parasite rather than the parasite itself. If the novel approach proves effective in further studies, it could potentially be used to enhance existing malaria vaccines, the researchers said. (2018-04-11)

New study finds extra bite of blood transforms invasive Asian tiger mosquito from poor to potent spreader of Zika virus
The invasive Asian tiger mosquito now rapidly spreading in parts of the United States and Europe may have been significantly underestimated as a potential source of Zika and dengue virus infections -- and for one simple reason: they were underfed, according to a new study presented today at the 66th American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. (2017-11-07)

Decline in deaths from most infectious diseases in US, large differences among counties
Deaths due to most infectious diseases decreased in the United States from 1980 to 2014, although there were large differences among counties. (2018-03-27)

Analysis links US government global health R&D funding to jobs, economic benefits across states
The Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today by the Global Health Technologies Coalition. This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal funding to create vaccines and treatments to combat deadly global diseases also benefits American states. (2018-05-01)

People with HIV who smoke are more likely to die from lung cancer than from HIV itself
People living with HIV who adhere to antiretroviral therapy but smoke cigarettes are around 10 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from HIV itself, according to a study led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. (2017-09-18)

Antibiotics for dental procedures linked to superbug infection, study shows
Dental procedures are an overlooked source of antibiotic prescribing, which is a concern as these medications increase the risk of developing C. difficile, according to an IDWeek study. (2017-10-06)

NIH study supports use of short-term HIV treatment interruption in clinical trials
A short-term pause in HIV treatment during a carefully monitored clinical trial does not lead to lasting expansion of the HIV reservoir nor cause irreversible damage to the immune system, new findings suggest. (2018-01-11)

Omalizumab improves efficacy of oral immunotherapy for multiple food allergies
Combining a 16-week initial course of the medication omalizumab with oral immunotherapy (OIT) greatly improves the efficacy of OIT for children with allergies to multiple foods, new clinical trial findings show. After 36 weeks, more than 80 percent of children who received omalizumab and OIT could safely consume two-gram portions of at least two foods to which they were allergic, compared with only a third of children who received placebo and OIT. (2017-12-11)

NIH scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. Infection with CCHF virus is fatal in nearly one of every three cases. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHF exist, primarily because a suitable animal model for studying the disease has not been available. Now, as reported in Nature Microbiology, researchers at NIAID have developed a new animal model to study the disease. (2018-04-09)

New HIV guideline outlines cost-effective prevention strategies for high-risk people
A new Canadian guideline outlines how new biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection can best be used in high-risk populations both before and after exposure to the virus. The guideline, published in CMAJ, applies to adults at risk of HIV infection through sexual activity or injection drug use. (2017-11-27)

More than 3 million children under 5 years old will die from infectious diseases next year
A new report outlines the alarming burden of pediatric infectious diseases across the world. (2016-11-03)

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