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Popular Insects News and Current Events, Insects News Articles.
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Big data for little creatures
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers at UC Riverside has received $3 million from the National Science Foundation Research Traineeship program to prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers who will learn how to exploit the power of big data to understand insects. (2016-10-10)
How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain
Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain. (2018-10-08)
Crunch time for food security
Insects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. (2017-11-10)
Putting animals in their best light -- USC researchers find some shades of LED lamps threaten wildlife
A USC research team identifies harmful effects to wildlife as LED lights proliferate. (2018-06-12)
Lack of water is key stressor for urban trees
A recent study finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well -- unless they are thirsty. (2018-03-13)
New study changes our view on flying insects
For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. (2017-09-29)
Novel body structure likely tied to mating in new extinct insect species
Based on 2-D and 3-D data of several morphological features, researchers scanned all specimens with different μ-Ct devices at Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). (2018-01-25)
Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators
A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. (2017-12-20)
Research shows how environment plays key role in changing movement behavior of animals
University of Leicester mathematicians develop theory which helps to unravel long-standing mysteries of animal movement. (2017-10-30)
Scientists investigate how different houses and lifestyles affect which bugs live with us
Humans have lived under the same roof with bugs since we first began building shelters 20,000 years ago. (2017-11-10)
Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk
A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. (2017-12-08)
Flies and bees act like plant cultivators
Pollinator insects accelerate plant evolution, but a plant changes in different ways depending on the pollinator. (2017-03-14)
Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying up
The larva of the sleeping chironomid, Polypedilum vanderplanki -- a mosquito-like insect that inhabits semi-arid areas of Africa -- is well known for being able to come back to life after being nearly completely desiccated, losing up to 97 percent of its body's water content. (2018-03-09)
What gives bees their sweet tooth?
Scientists have discovered bees linger on a flower, emptying it of nectar, because they have sugar-sensing taste neurons which work together to prolong the pleasure of the sweetness. (2018-05-10)
Digger wasps and their chemistry
Astonishing evolution: Because digger wasps switched prey, the chemical protective layer of their skin changed, too. (2017-11-03)
In bee decline, fungicides emerge as improbable villain
When a Cornell-led team of scientists analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range contractions, they expected to find stressors like changes in land use, geography or insecticides. (2017-11-14)
UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes
Biologists at UC look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges. (2018-01-11)
Freeloading orchid relies on mushrooms above and below ground
The orchid species Gastrodia pubilabiata mimics rotting mushrooms or fermented fruit, and is pollinated by fruit flies who mistakenly lay their eggs in its flowers. (2018-03-22)
Computer models allow farmers to diversify pest management methods
A technology developed by Brazilian researchers can help fighting highly resistant agricultural pests by analyzing the connections between the pests' patterns of dispersal in crops and different configurations in diversified intercropping systems. (2018-02-20)
Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. (2012-05-11)
Common bacterium may help control disease-bearing mosquitoes
Genes from a common bacterium can be harnessed to sterilize male insects, a tool that can potentially control populations of both disease-bearing mosquitoes and agricultural pests, researchers at Yale University and Vanderbilt University report in related studies published Feb. (2017-02-27)
Once declared extinct, Lord Howe Island stick insects really do live
Lord Howe Island stick insects were once numerous on the tiny crescent-shaped island off the coast of Australia for which they are named. (2017-10-05)
Eating insects might seem yucky, but they are nutritious and there is no reason you can't
Almost all living primates still have working versions of the gene needed to produce a stomach enzyme that breaks down exoskeletons. (2018-01-24)
What's the best way to accelerate: Muscles or springs?
A new study has pinpointed principles that are common in the mechanical systems that animals, plants, fungi and machines use to maximize kinetic energy delivery. (2018-04-26)
Fire ants are emerging nuisance for Virginians
Red imported fire ants, which have caused trouble in Florida and Texas for decades, are advancing in Virginia. (2007-05-24)
City lights setting traps for migrating birds
A University of Delaware study has examined how light pollution lures birds into urban areas during fall migration, a trend that poses risk for the fowl that often fly into buildings and has increased with the addition of brighter LED lights. (2018-01-19)
Biochemical networks mapped in midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
Scientists have mapped for the first time the midgut metabolites of the Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that can transmit viruses that cause dengue, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever to humans. (2018-02-15)
Nicotine enhances bees' activity
Nicotine-laced nectar can speed up a bumblebee's ability to learn flower colors, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). (2017-05-16)
Insects take a bigger bite out of plants in a higher CO2 world
Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are rising at an alarming rate, and new research indicates that soybean plant defenses go down as CO2 goes up. (2008-03-24)
Making mosquitoes self-destruct
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have developed transgenic mosquitoes that stably express the Cas9 enzyme in their germline. (2017-11-14)
Sowing strips of flowering plants has limited effect on pollination
Many pollinating insects benefit from a small-scale agricultural landscape with pastures, meadows and other unploughed environments. (2018-04-06)
Jumping water striders know how to avoid breaking of the water surface
When escaping from attacking predators, different water strider species adjust their jump performance to their mass and morphology in order to jump off the water as fast and soon as possible without breaking of the water surface. (2016-12-08)
How does agriculture affect vulnerable insect-eating birds?
Aerial insectivores -- birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing -- are declining across North America as agricultural intensification leads to diminishing insect abundance and diversity in many areas. (2018-08-29)
Moths with a nose for learning
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and NIST have discovered that when training insects, the process of building associations is not a simple matter of strengthening connections through reinforcement. (2008-10-02)
For global invasion, Argentine ants use chemical weapons
In a paper published today in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of California, Riverside show how Argentine ants use chemical secretions as weapons in their interactions with harvester ants, which are native to California. (2018-01-24)
Insect warning colors aid cancer and tropical disease drug discovery
Brightly colored beetles or butterfly larvae nibbling on a plant may signal the presence of chemical compounds active against cancer cell lines and tropical parasitic diseases, according to researchers at Smithsonian's Tropical Research Institute in Panama. (2008-07-08)
Recovery from acid rain 'much slower than expected'
Studies in Scotland and Wales show that streams still have high levels of acidity from pollution in the 1970s and 1980s, despite efforts to clean them. (2007-09-28)
Humans no longer have ancient defence mechanism against viruses
Insects and plants have an important ancient defense mechanism that helps them to fight viruses. (2017-09-15)
University of Houston study shows BP oil spill hurt marshes, but recovery possible
A study published in PLoS ONE by two researchers at the University of Houston shows that arthropods living in coastal salt marshes affected by BP oil spill were damaged but they were able to recover if their host plants remained healthy. (2012-03-07)
Insects and umami receptors
Insects, like mammals including humans, sort chemicals by taste into a few categories and use this information to decide whether to ingest or reject food. (2017-01-23)
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