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Popular Intensive Care News and Current Events

Popular Intensive Care News and Current Events, Intensive Care News Articles.
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Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care
Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers at the University of Warwick and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have found on computer simulated patients. (2019-02-20)
Black babies more likely to have nursing care missed in their NICU stay
Everybody wants a healthy life for their baby. Black babies are more likely to be born prematurely, which puts them at risk for death and developmental problems. (2017-09-18)
ICU care for COPD, heart failure and heart attack may not be better
Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit? (2017-02-17)
Motorcycle crashes cause 5 times as many deaths as car accidents, 6 times the health costs
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs. (2017-11-20)
Improving communication, education and parent satisfaction with NICU discharge
Parents whose children have lengthy stays in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) dream of one day taking their baby home. (2017-09-15)
'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. (2018-03-14)
45 percent of parents experience depression, anxiety and stress when newborns leave NICU
Almost half of parents whose children were admitted to Children's National Health System's neonatal intensive care unit experienced postpartum depressive symptoms, anxiety and stress when their newborns were discharged from the hospital. (2017-09-15)
Social, public health services crucial in fight against HIV/AIDS
Patients at risk for HIV need to be linked to services -- such as mental health and syringe exchange programs -- that will help them stay in care, adhere to medication and avoid reinfection, a new University of Michigan study suggests. (2018-03-19)
Could handheld electronic devices contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome?
In a study of 48 university students, intensive users of electronic devices reported more wrist/hand pain than non-intensive users. (2017-06-21)
For women with genetic risk, bi-annual MRI beats mammograms
Intensive surveillance including a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) exam every six months was far more effective in detecting breast cancer in younger women with a high-risk genetic profile than an annual mammogram. (2017-12-08)
Pushy or laid back? Economic factors influence parenting style
A new study co-authored by Yale economist Fabrizio Zilibotti argues that parenting styles are shaped by economic factors that incentivize one strategy over others. (2017-10-05)
Higher doses of rifampin appear more effective in fighting TB without increasing risk of adverse events
Higher daily doses of rifampin, a cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment, killed more TB bacteria in sputum cultures, and the higher doses did so without increasing the adverse effects of treatment, according to a randomized controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2018-06-29)
Test can identify patients in intensive care at risk of life-threatening infections
Patients in intensive care units are at significant risk of potentially life-threatening secondary infections, including from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile. (2018-06-13)
New research shows golf carts causing serious injuries to children
As golf carts become increasingly popular in communities beyond the fairway, new research shows, a significant number of children are being seriously injured while using them. (2017-09-15)
Early psychosis programs significantly reduce patient mortality, study finds
In a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute (Lawson), Western University and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) have found that specialized programs for early psychosis can substantially reduce patient mortality. (2018-03-02)
Critical Care Recovery Center concept could benefit adult ICU survivors of all ages
A new study shows that the Critical Care Recovery Center, a care model originally developed by Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research scientists for older adults with dementia, could benefit ICU survivors of all ages. (2017-11-14)
Researchers join forces to improve life for children with genetic disorder
The achievements of three girls who received intensive therapy through the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute's Neuromotor Research Clinic based on innovative pediatric neurorehabilitation research have been documented in a report published in BMC Research Notes. (2018-03-16)
New framework for multimorbidity care identifies changes and gaps
Researchers have developed a new framework for reporting and designing models of care for multimorbidity. (2017-11-20)
Eczema plus family history can mean a longer hospital stay for kids with asthma
Research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's Annual Scientific Meeting examines the relationship between medical history and allergic reactions in children, and how long they stayed in the hospital after an asthma attack. (2017-10-27)
Influence of technology acquisition on organizational performance studied in Iran
80 international companies from Iran were selected, and 320 respondents in key managerial positions were questioned. (2018-05-08)
Online intervention helps sustain weight loss
New research, led by the University of Southampton, has found that an online behavioural counselling tool is effective at helping people lose weight. (2016-07-26)
Primary care clinicians' willingness to care for transgender patients
A new survey finds that most family medicine and general internal medicine clinicians are willing to provide routine care for transgender patients. (2018-11-12)
Simple blood test identifies critically ill patients who misuse alcohol, study finds
A simple blood test for a compound called PEth can accurately identify critically ill hospital patients who misuse alcohol, a study has found. (2017-11-09)
Saline use on the decline at Vanderbilt following landmark studies
Vanderbilt University Medical Center is encouraging its medical providers to stop using saline as intravenous fluid therapy for most patients, a change provoked by two companion landmark studies released today that are anticipated to improve survival and decrease kidney complications. (2018-02-27)
Resiliency in NICU parents may be linked to lower depression and anxiety
Parents of vulnerable newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) who feel less resilient may experience more symptoms of psychological distress, including depression and anxiety. (2018-11-05)
UTA urban researcher shows impact of urban sprawl on life expectancy, innovation hubs
A recently published study by a University of Texas at Arlington urban researcher shows a correlation between urban sprawl and a decreased life expectancy in the United States. (2018-07-03)
SCAI examines strengths and weaknesses of sham PCI trial
This year, SCAI celebrated the forty-year anniversary of a groundbreaking procedure, now known as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), that has saved millions of lives and enhanced the lives of millions more. (2017-11-02)
Novel intensive care improves treatment for heart patients -- and cuts costs
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine find that a new, collaborative treatment model for seriously ill heart patients with breathing difficulties results in better care and lower costs. (2017-09-11)
Equine Medical Center records successful year for neonatal foals
Premature delivery is as big a problem with baby horses as it is with baby humans. (2006-07-13)
Align funding with innovations in health care to improve patient outcomes
To encourage innovation in health care, governments need to move away from current siloed funding to funding that encourages collaboration among providers in managing patients who need care in a variety of settings, argue the authors of an analysis in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)
Massage could be used to aid recovery of damaged limbs
Massage could increase the regrowth of muscle after muscle loss, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. (2017-10-31)
Gastric bypass surgery can give better control for diabetes and obesity than lifestyle modification
Patients treated with a form of bariatric surgery did significantly better than patients provided with an intensive diabetes and weight management program. (2018-03-02)
Joint damage in healthy military recruits may mimic spondyloarthropathies
The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of healthy military recruits showed sacroiliac joint damage similar to that found in axial spondyloarthritis after just six weeks of intensive physical training, reinforcing the importance of exercising caution when interpreting MRI results, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in San Diego. (2017-11-04)
Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year. (2018-01-19)
In hypertensive patients, greater blood pressure drops may harm the kidneys
In patients treated for hypertension, greater reductions in mean blood pressure were linked with reduced kidney function. (2017-11-03)
Patients in primary care networks had fewer visits to ED, shorter stays
Patients receiving care from physicians in primary care networks were less likely to visit emergency departments, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-12)
New study by Ben-Gurion Univerisity researchers shows female physician bias in ICU admissions
According to the findings, female physicians admitted approximately 20 percent fewer of their female patients to the ICU than did male physicians, and 12 percent fewer female patients than male patients to the intensive cardiac care unit. (2018-02-07)
Team approach to support families improves ICU patient-centered care
Families of critically ill hospital patients report higher satisfaction with clinician communication and a better perception of patient-centered care when the care team uses a low-cost strategy involving intensive emotional support and frequent meetings. (2018-05-23)
Research reveals restorative justice reduces recidivism
Restorative justice programs, such victim-offender mediation and community impact panels, are more effective in reducing recidivism rates among juvenile offenders than traditional court processing, a study by researchers at Sam Houston State University found. (2016-07-28)
Younger patients constitute half of hospital-acquired pneumonia cases, most of which originate outside of the ICU, study finds
Hospital-acquired pneumonia has long been associated with the elderly and intensive care units (ICU). (2018-01-09)
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