Popular Interventional Radiology News and Current Events

Popular Interventional Radiology News and Current Events, Interventional Radiology News Articles.
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Machine learning method identifies precancerous colon polyps
A machine learning algorithm helps accurately differentiate benign and premalignant colorectal polyps on CT colonography scans, according to a new study. (2021-02-23)

Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days. Chest X-rays are routinely performed to diagnose and monitor a wide range of conditions affecting the lungs, heart, bones, and soft tissues. (2019-01-22)

MRI findings shed light on multiple sclerosis
New magnetic resonance imaging research shows that changes in brain blood flow associated with vein abnormalities are not specific for multiple sclerosis and do not contribute to its severity, despite what some researchers have speculated. (2012-08-21)

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage. (2020-10-30)

Measurements from 3-D augmented reality holographic models shown to be highly accurate
Measurements taken on projected augmented reality 3-D holographic models were shown to be essentially as accurate as 'gold standard' measurements and nearly approaching that of PACS measurements, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C. (2018-02-09)

Abnormal brain connections seen in preschoolers with autism
Preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, have abnormal connections between certain networks of their brains that can be seen using a special MRI technique, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings may one day help guide treatments for ASD. (2018-03-27)

International medical graduates care for Medicare patients with greater health care needs
A study by a Massachusetts General Hospital research team indicates that internal medicine physicians who are graduates of medical schools outside the US care for Medicare patients with more complex medical needs than those cared for by graduates of American medical schools. (2019-02-19)

Artificial intelligence used in clinical practice to measure breast density
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm measures breast density at the level of an experienced mammographer, according to a new study. The researchers said the study, the result of a collaboration between breast imagers and AI experts, represents a groundbreaking implementation of AI into routine clinical practice. (2018-10-16)

New treatment option for ruptured brain aneurysms
Researchers in Finland have identified an effective new treatment option using stent-assisted coil embolization on patients who have suffered a ruptured brain aneurysm, a potentially life-threatening event, according to a new study. (2009-08-25)

Safety of bioabsorbable polymer against durable polymer DES in high-risk PCI patients
A novel study sought to reveal whether drug-eluting stents (DES) coated with bioabsorbable polymer (BP) presented a safety advantage without compromising efficacy compared to durable polymer (DP) formulations. Subgroup findings from the TWILIGHT trial were presented today during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference. (2020-05-14)

UA scientist identifies cellular gene signatures for heart muscle regeneration
A research team led by Jared Churko, PhD, director of the University of Arizona iPSC Core in the UA Sarver Heart Center, used a transcriptomic approach -- studying what genes are expressed -- to identify gene signatures of cell subpopulations identified as atrial-like or ventricular-like. This understanding could lead to regenerative therapy discoveries for the millions of people living with damaged heart muscle caused by heart attacks or other chronic heart conditions. (2018-11-30)

Bevacizumab dramatically improves severe hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) associated bleeding
Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) with severe bleeding, who were treated with intravenous bevacizumab, reported a marked reduction in nose bleeds and gastrointestinal bleeding and were able to stop or considerably reduce blood transfusions, resulting in significantly improved quality of life. A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings provides good quality evidence for the excellent safety profile and efficacy of intravenous bevacizumab in the management of these patients. (2018-01-29)

St. Michael's Hospital cardiology team reports a world first
Interventional cardiologist Dr. Neil Fam of St. Michael's Hospital has performed a world-first procedure, which he described in the Feb, 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions. (2018-03-02)

Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue more likely to develop contralateral disease
Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue have almost a two-fold increased risk of developing disease in the contralateral breast, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer. (2017-02-07)

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomy
A new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together. (2018-05-08)

Radiologists can help identify victims of domestic violence
Radiologists may play a crucial role in identifying signs of intimate partner violence, a type of domestic violence, according to a new study. Radiologists can identify potential violence-related patterns of injury and work closely with referring providers to provide care for the victims. (2019-02-05)

MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study shows
A test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C. (2018-04-05)

Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas
Researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study. (2017-04-25)

Re-interventions are common in long-term survivors of childhood heart operation
Among patients who undergo childhood heart surgery for the severe birth defect single-ventricle disease, two-thirds of survivors require a surgical or catheter-based procedure within 20 years. Pediatric cardiology researchers note that doctors should counsel families about the likelihood of re-interventions. (2017-09-18)

Personalized treatment benefits kidney cancer patients
Personalized treatment plans may extend life expectancy for early-stage kidney cancer patients who have risk factors for worsening kidney disease, according to a new study. (2019-01-15)

University of Leicester announces world first forensic technique
A team led by a University of Leicester forensic pathologist is believed to be the first in the world to use a new radiological approach for mass fatality investigation. (2006-02-24)

Imaging plays key role in evaluating injuries at Olympics
The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. When injuries occur, it is critical that they be evaluated quickly. Onsite imaging services play an important role in the management of Olympic athletes with sports-related injuries and disorders, according to a new study. (2018-02-26)

Study suggests molecular imaging strategy for determining molecular classifications of NSCLC
Recent findings suggest a novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach determining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status for improved lung cancer patient management. The findings are published in the March 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine. (2018-03-07)

Screening mammography for women 40-49 detects more cancers compared with older age groups
When compared to the screening population ages 50 and over, screening mammography in women ages 40-49 detects 19.3 percent additional cancers at the expense of an overall 1.5 percent increase in callbacks and 0.1 percent in increased biopsies, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC. (2018-03-13)

Interactive virtual reality enhances physicians' treatment planning of complex conditions
Interactive virtual reality (VR) brings medical images to life on screen, showing interventional radiologists a patient's unique internal anatomy to help physicians effectively prepare and tailor their approach to complex treatments, such as splenic artery aneurysm repair, according to new research being presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2018-03-18)

What's next for nuclear medicine training?
The 'Hot Topic' article in the October issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, titled Nuclear Medicine Training: What Now?, examines the role of nuclear medicine in the era of precision medicine and the need for training to evolve with the practice. An associated editorial presents an alternative view, questioning whether 16 months of specialized nuclear medicine training is enough. The two perspectives kick off a discussion that will unfold in coming JNM issues. (2017-10-04)

CT angiography highly accurate, multicenter trials show
Computed tomography angiography is as accurate as an invasive angiogram in detecting coronary artery disease, according to findings from the first two prospective multicenter 64-slice scanner trials. (2007-11-26)

New study finds healthy children of Alzheimer patients show early brain changes
Medical College of Wisconsin researchers in Milwaukee have reported that children of Alzheimer's patients who are carriers of a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease have neurological changes that are detectable long before clinical symptoms may appear. (2008-07-29)

New method effective in detecting dangerous coronary plaque
A new noninvasive method has shown success in detecting and measuring noncalcified plaque, a buildup of soft deposits embedded deep within the walls of the heart's arteries, undetectable by angiography or cardiac stress tests -- and prone to rupture without warning. (2008-05-29)

Opioid controlled substance agreements safely reduce health care visits, Mayo study finds
The medical community has long known that patients on long-term opioid therapy often have significantly more health care visits. But adhering to a standardized care process model for opioid prescriptions appears to reduce the overall number of health care visits for these patients while maintaining safety, shows new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-09-20)

New nuclear medicine technique could help tackle brain disease
A new molecular imaging method can monitor the success of gene therapy in all areas of the brain, potentially allowing physicians to more effectively tackle brain conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. The research was presented today at the SNMMI 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26 in Philadelphia. (2018-06-25)

Women more likely to use other preventive health services after mammography
Medicare beneficiaries who undergo breast cancer screening with mammography are more likely than unscreened women to undergo other preventive health services like screening for cervical cancer and osteoporosis, according to a major new study. (2018-06-05)

Unusual case of a woman who suffered stroke during sex
Minutes after having sexual intercourse with her boyfriend, a 35-year-old woman suddenly felt her left arm go weak. Her speech became slurred and she lost feeling on the left side of her face. She was having a stroke. Doctors later concluded the stroke probably was due to several related factors, including birth control pills, a venous blood clot, sexual intercourse and a heart defect. (2008-09-15)

3D breast imaging could revolutionize cancer screening
The largest report to date shows that 3D DBT (versus 2D DM) increases the detection rate for cancer overall by 28.6 percent and by 43.8 percent in detecting invasive cancers. (2014-06-17)

First ever risk tool predicts readmission rates for patients after undergoing TAVR
A new study looked at the effectiveness of novel risk tool to predict 30-day readmission rates in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) presented today at SCAI 2018 Scientific Sessions. (2018-04-27)

CRF research to be presented at ACC.19
Research from the Cardiovascular Research Foundation and the CRF Clinical Trials Center will be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session taking place March 16-18, 2019 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana. They will be presenting the latest data on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), imaging technologies, renal denervation, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement. (2019-03-14)

Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care
Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2017-03-08)

What is the cost of interrupting a radiologist?
A first of its kind study shows typical interruptions experienced by on-call radiologists do not reduce diagnostic accuracy but do change what they look at and increase the amount of time spent on a case. (2018-03-19)

High-strength MRI tracks MS progression
The development of scars, or lesions, in the brain's cortical gray matter is a powerful predictor of neurological disability for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new study. Researchers said that the findings suggest a role for ultra-high-field-strength MRI in evaluating the progression of MS. (2019-04-09)

Sedentary behavior associated with diabetic retinopathy
In a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology, Paul D. Loprinzi, Ph.D., of the University of Mississippi, University, Miss., evaluated the association of sedentary behavior with diabetic retinopathy using data from the 2005 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. (2016-08-04)

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