Popular Invertebrates News and Current Events

Popular Invertebrates News and Current Events, Invertebrates News Articles.
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For selenium in rivers, timing matters
Researchers have gained new insight into an ongoing environmental health problem. (2021-02-23)

DNA barcoding technology helping monitor health of all-important boreal forests
The Boreal forest is essential to Canada and the world, storing carbon, purifying water and air and regulating climate. But keeping tabs on the health of this vulnerable biome has proven to be a painstaking and time-consuming undertaking - until now. Cutting-edge DNA metabarcoding technology developed by the University of Guelph can help speed up and improve the monitoring process, according to a new study published today in Scientific Reports. (2017-10-06)

Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survival
Analysis of 13 years of demographic and genetic data from 1,006 sea otters to assess multiple effective population size estimators, as well as temporal trends in genetic diversity and population genetic structure, show a need for development of new delisting criteria for the southern sea otter. (2018-05-01)

In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil
In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts. (2018-01-05)

Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects
Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. An article on that was published in the Russian Journal of Marine Biology. (2019-02-14)

Decreased oxygen levels could present hidden threat to marine species
In research published in Nature Scientific Reports, scientists from the University of Plymouth have shown that creatures which develop in hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions in the marine environment could experience previously unseen hindered development, and become compromised as adults. (2018-03-14)

CT scans reveal new muscles in horseshoe crab appendages
Digital dissection shows that two horseshoe crab appendages -- the pushing leg and the male pedipalp -- each have one more muscle than had been thought, according to a study published Feb. 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Russell Bicknell from University of New England, Australia, and colleagues. (2018-02-14)

Unravelling the costs of rubber agriculture on biodiversity
A striking decline in ant biodiversity found on land converted to a rubber plantation in China. (2016-05-16)

More squid, less fish: North Pacific seabirds alter their prey preferences
Over the last 125 years, and particularly after an uptick in industrial fishing since 1950, North Pacific seabirds -- typically fish consumers -- have shifted their prey preferences, a new study reports; they are eating lower on the food chain, consuming more squid. (2018-02-14)

Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Nine years ago tomorrow -- April 20, 2010 -- crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast, and reveals the key role that marsh grasses play in the overall recovery of these important coastal wetlands. (2019-04-19)

Breeding trouble: Meta-analysis identifies fishy issues with captive stocks
A meta-analysis has found patterns that may be jeopardising the long-term success of worldwide animal breeding programs, which increasingly act as an insurance against extinction in conservation, and for food security. Captive-born animals had, on average, almost half the odds of reproductive success compared to their wild-born counterparts in captivity; in aquaculture, the effects were particularly pronounced. The Sydney-based scientists were surprised by how universal the patterns were across the animal kingdom. (2018-03-13)

Fish the primary source of nutrition in medieval Northern Ostrobothnia
Researchers investigated the diet of people buried in the Ii Hamina, Northern Finland, cemetery from the 15th to the 17th centuries by analysing isotopes in the bones of the deceased. Isotopes preserve information on the various nutrient sources used by humans during their lifetime. A study published in the Environmental Archaeology journal reveals that the dominant protein source was small fish, such as roach or Baltic herring. (2018-03-16)

Climate change study finds New Hampshire's warmer weather will bring warmer streams
Air temperature increases from climate change will make New Hampshire's streams warmer, according to Dartmouth-led research published in 'Freshwater Biology.' The study examined the extent to which stream waters are warming, which has implications for freshwater ecosystems across the nation given that many species depend on cold water to survive. (2018-04-30)

Microbiome study suggests marine nematodes are not picky eaters
UC Riverside researchers report in Molecular Ecology that the likelihood that nematode worms have similar microbial profiles does not correlate with how closely they are related. Holly Bik, an assistant professor in UCR's Department of Nematology, led the study. (2018-04-03)

Walking sharks discovered in the tropics
Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea. (2020-01-20)

Instability of wildlife trade does not encourage trappers to conserve natural habitats
The collection of wildlife for trade is unreliable and financially risky, thus limiting opportunities to incentivise biodiversity conservation at a local level, according to research by the University of Kent. (2018-03-07)

Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal mussel
In a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. Mussels, and other invertebrates, play an essential role in their ecosystem, and the ocean is the final sink for many pollutants like PFAS, so it is important to monitor regions that may have higher environmental concentrations due to unregulated discharges of these substances. (2018-02-05)

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspect
As ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propose a new, broad nomenclature in a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science. (2018-03-13)

Marine invertebrates have noisy human neighbors
Marine invertebrates are impacted by the rising levels of underwater noise produced by humans, but the production of underwater noise is not only difficult to control, but the direct effect on marine invertebrates can be challenging to observe or measure. Researchers will present results on the use of a standing wave tube to simulate and measure the effects of anthropogenic noise on marine invertebrates at the 174th ASA Meeting, Dec. 4-8, 2017, in New Orleans. (2017-12-06)

Bees can learn to use a tool by observing others
Simply by watching other bees, bumblebees can learn to use a novel tool to obtain a reward, a new study reveals. (2017-02-23)

Scientists find that rain may not always be a welcome thing to waterbirds
Scientists from the Smithsonian and colleagues have found that waterbird communities can be the (2012-06-07)

When natural disaster strikes, can insects and other invertebrates recover?
After a 100-year flood struck south central Oklahoma in 2015, a study of the insects, arthropods, and other invertebrates in the area revealed striking declines of most invertebrates in the local ecosystem, a result that researchers say illustrates the hidden impacts of natural disasters. (2018-03-15)

Digestive ability of ancient insects could boost biofuel development
A study of the unusual digestive system of an ancient group of insects has provided new insights into future biofuel production. (2018-02-22)

A lesson from Darwin
When British naturalist Charles Darwin traveled to the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he took notice of the giant kelp forests ringing the islands. He believed that if those forests were destroyed, a significant number of species would be lost. These underwater ecosystems, Darwin believed, could be even more important than forests on land. (2018-03-14)

'Aquatic osteoporosis' jellifying lakes
North American lakes are suffering from declining calcium levels, says new research from Queen's University. (2014-11-19)

New study predicts worldwide change in shallow reef ecosystems as waters warm
A new study based on the first global survey of marine life by scuba divers has provided fresh insights into how climate change is affecting the distribution of marine life. The research published in the journal Science Advances predicts that as the oceans warm fish -- which appear to be superior predators in warm water -- will extend their ranges away from the equator and cause a decline in the diversity of invertebrates such as crabs, lobsters, sea urchins and whelks. (2017-10-18)

MSU biliogists: Bryozoans, brachiopods, and phoronida originate from the common ancestor
An associate of the Faculty of Biology of Lomonosov Moscow State University studied the nervous system of adult phoronida using modern methods and presented new facts in the long-lasting discussion about the taxonomy of invertebrates proving that phoronids, barchiopods, and bryozoans are relatives despite earlier arguments. The results of the work were published in Scientific Reports. The study was carried out within the framework of the 'Noah's Ark' project supported with a grant of Russian Science Foundation (RSF). (2018-01-30)

Humans no longer have ancient defence mechanism against viruses
Insects and plants have an important ancient defense mechanism that helps them to fight viruses. This is encoded in their DNA. Scientists have long assumed that vertebrates -- including humans -- also had this same mechanism. But researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have found that vertebrates lost this particular asset in the course of their evolution. (2017-09-15)

Many species now going extinct may vanish without a fossil trace
Scientists struggle to compare the magnitude of Earth's ongoing sixth mass-extinction event with the five great die-offs of prehistory. A new study by three paleontologists shows that the species now perishing may vanish without a permanent trace -- and earlier extinctions may be underestimated as well. (2016-03-21)

Unusual new zoantharian species is the first described solitary species in over 100 years
A very unusual new species of zoantharian was discovered by two researchers in Okinawa. Although most zoantharians are colonial and many are known from coral reefs, the new species lives a solitary life in muddy habitats. This species, now published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, is the first of its genus described in over 100 years. (2016-07-25)

The origins of Cuban species
An international research team suggests the endangered Cuban solenodon evolved after the extinction of dinosaurs. (2016-08-24)

Invertebrates inspire first fully 3-D printed active materials for robots
To overcome the material rigidity and actuation limitations in current robotic systems, a joint US Army Research Laboratory and University of Minnesota research project sought inspiration from invertebrates. (2018-04-17)

How invasive species threaten bats
A new review is the first to describe the scope of threats to bats by invasive species. (2017-08-30)

Finnish researchers discover what is on the menu for dragonflies
Researchers from the Universities of Turku and Helsinki, Finland, are the first in the world to discover which species adult dragonflies and damselflies prey upon, as modern laboratory techniques enabled the study of the insects' diet. In the study, prey DNA was extracted from the tiny dragonfly droppings and the researchers managed to identify dozens of prey species from the samples. The results shed light on dragonflies' position in natural food webs with an unprecedented specificity. (2017-10-03)

Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'
New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde (Brasília, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents. (2018-04-17)

Acidification of the sea hampers reproduction of marine species
Within 100 years, it is reckoned that the world's seas will be three times as acidic as they are now. The lower pH may strike a severe blow to the ability of marine species to reproduce, according to research on sea urchins at the University of Gothenburg. (2008-07-29)

More 'losers' than 'winners' predicted for Southern Ocean seafloor animals
A new study of the marine invertebrates living in the seas around Antarctica reveals there will be more 'losers' than 'winners' over the next century as the Antarctic seafloor warms. The results are published in the journal Nature Climate Change this week. (2017-09-04)

Study: Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
A future with stormier seas may bring strong changes to the biodiversity of coastal sea life. (2018-10-30)

Giant killers
Giant kelp forests -- those ethereal, swaying columns of seaweed found in the intermediate to deep water zones of cooler coasts along the Pacific Ocean and Southern Hemisphere -- provide habitat for a variety of species that spend their lives in kelp's canopies or at the rocky bottoms. (2018-10-30)

Hunting squid slowed by rising carbon levels
James Cook University scientists in Australia have found high carbon dioxide levels cause squid to bungle attacks on their prey. (2018-03-21)

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