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Popular Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Current Events

Popular Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Current Events, Irritable Bowel Syndrome News Articles.
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Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. (2019-02-26)
Non-invasive first trimester blood test reliably detects Down's syndrome
Cell-free fetal DNA testing, which measures the relative amount of free fetal DNA in a pregnant woman's blood, is a new screening test that indicates the risk of Down syndrome (trisomy 21), (2015-02-02)
For patients with prostate cancer, dysfunction due to treatment side effects results in increased emotional distress -- and vice versa
A new study published in The Journal of Urology reports that men with prostate cancer who had worse urinary, bowel, and sexual function after surgery or radiotherapy than others experienced more emotional distress. (2018-05-31)
Obesity and health problems: New research on a safeguard mechanism
Obesity and health problems: Researchers at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital in Montreal shed light on a safeguard mechanism. (2018-03-16)
Smoking in patients with heart attack reduced with varenicline
In patients who have had a heart attack, the drug varenicline significantly reduced smoking during the following year, found a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-26)
Microbiome science may help doctors deliver more effective, personalized treatment to children with irritable bowel syndrome
To improve the treatment of children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), investigators have developed a sophisticated way to analyze the microbial and metabolic contents of the gut. (2019-04-17)
Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)
Texas A&M AgriLife study shows BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease
A recent study in a preclinical model of inflammatory bowel disease shows dietary exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA, found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can increase mortality and worsen its symptoms. (2018-07-05)
Family impact of congenital Zika syndrome likely to last a lifetime
The impact of congenital Zika syndrome on families will be substantial and will last a lifetime, given its severity and uncertainty about long-term outcomes for infants. (2018-02-01)
Study finds people with type 2 diabetes at higher risk of death from both obesity-related and non-obesity related cancers
Being overweight or obese may put adults with diabetes at greater risk of dying from cancer than their diabetes-free counterparts, particularly for obesity-related cancers such as those arising from the bowel, kidney, and pancreas in men and women, and from the breast and endometrium (lining of the uterus) in women. (2018-10-02)
Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness. (2019-11-05)
Researchers reverse heart failure in Marfan mice
In experiments with mice that have a rodent form of Marfan syndrome, Johns Hopkins researchers report that even modestly increasing stress on the animals' hearts -- at levels well-tolerated in normal mice -- can initiate heart failure. (2017-11-14)
Mutations in bone cells can drive leukemia in neighboring stem cells
DNA mutations in bone cells that support blood development can drive leukemia formation in nearby blood stem cells. (2016-10-26)
Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
Type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-01-13)
Weight loss surgery linked to an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
A new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis has found a link between the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a past history of weight loss surgery. (2018-03-07)
Links between eating red meat and distal colon cancer in women
A new study suggests that a diet free from red meat significantly reduces the risk of a type of colon cancer in women living in the United Kingdom. (2018-04-02)
Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. (2017-11-17)
Obese men may have higher chance of recurrence following radical prostatectomy
Among men with prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), those who were obese had a higher risk of biochemical recurrence, according to data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms Underlying Etiology and Outcomes, held Jan. (2018-01-26)
New coronavirus emerges from bats in China, devastates young swine
A newly identified coronavirus that killed nearly 25,000 piglets in 2016-17 in China emerged from horseshoe bats near the origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which emerged in 2002 in the same bat species. (2018-04-04)
The cost of opioid use during pregnancy
A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome -- often caused by mothers using opioids during pregnancy -- is increasing in the United States, and carries an enormous burden in terms of hospital days and costs. (2017-06-14)
Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations
Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. (2018-01-19)
Robotic surgery just got more autonomous
Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery. (2016-05-04)
The Down's syndrome 'super genome'
Only 20 percent of foetuses with trisomy 21 reach full term. (2018-01-19)
UPV/EHU researchers account for the complex symptoms of Angelman syndrome
A research group at the Faculty of Science and Technology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to reliably identify the changes in the proteins altered by the UBE3A enzyme, responsible for Angelman syndrome. (2018-04-19)
Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based training
Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire. (2018-01-31)
A new tool for forecasting the behavior of the microbiome
A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Massachusetts have developed a suite of computer algorithms that can accurately predict the behavior of the microbiome -- the vast collection of microbes living on and inside the human body. (2016-06-27)
Exploring 'clinical conundrum' of asthma-COPD overlap in nonsmokers with chronic asthma
Researchers may be closer to finding the mechanism responsible for loss of lung elastic recoil and airflow limitation in nonsmokers with chronic asthma. (2015-08-05)
Endocannabinoid system, a target to improve cognitive disorders in models of Down syndrome
A study by the Neuropharmacology Laboratory-NeuroPhar of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF reveals the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in cognitive disorders in mouse models of Down syndrome. (2019-02-06)
Could handheld electronic devices contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome?
In a study of 48 university students, intensive users of electronic devices reported more wrist/hand pain than non-intensive users. (2017-06-21)
Otago study first to report benefits and safety of FODMAP diet in children
The low FODMAP diet, a diet low in carbohydrates that trigger digestive symptoms like bloating and stomach pain, is a useful treatment in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal problems, new University of Otago research confirms. (2019-09-23)
Study finds childhood fitness reduces long-term cardiovascular risks of childhood obesity
Aerobic exercise might be a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity. (2016-05-24)
Researchers examine how opioids affect proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors
In a new study, researchers have characterized the effects of a series of opioids on proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors. (2017-12-06)
Chicken embryo illuminates role of thyroid hormone in brain development
A thyroid hormone transporter is essential for the earliest stages of brain development, according to a JNeurosci study of a region of the developing chicken brain with a layered structure similar to the human cerebral cortex. (2017-11-06)
Current screening test for prediabetes in children misses the diagnosis too often
Obese children, who are at increased risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, may not be getting the most appropriate test to screen for these conditions, a new Canadian study found. (2008-06-15)
Three in 4 don't know obesity causes cancer
Three out of four (75 percent) people in the UK are unaware of the link between obesity and cancer, according to a new Cancer Research UK report published today. (2016-09-08)
Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to stomach virus
Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as ME, is linked to a stomach virus, suggests research published ahead of print in Journal of Clinical Pathology. (2007-09-13)
Air pollution linked to irregular menstrual cycles
The air your teenage daughter breathes may be causing irregular menstrual cycles. (2018-01-25)
Anthracyclines improve survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients
Treatment with the class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines improves survival in women with HER2-positive breast cancer who have previously had surgery, but it may not offer any benefit for women with HER2-negative tumors, according to a study published online Dec. (2007-12-25)
Robotic implants spur tissue regeneration inside the body
An implanted, programmable medical robot can gradually lengthen tubular organs by applying traction forces -- stimulating tissue growth in stunted organs without interfering with organ function or causing apparent discomfort, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. (2018-01-10)
Zika-related nerve damage caused by immune response to the virus
The immune system's response to the Zika virus, rather than the virus itself, may be responsible for nerve-related complications of infection, according to a Yale study. (2017-11-20)
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