Popular Jellyfish News and Current Events

Popular Jellyfish News and Current Events, Jellyfish News Articles.
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A question of time
Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens. (2019-05-03)

Saki monkeys get screen time for more control over their lives in captivity
Scientists have designed and built an on-demand video device for white-faced saki monkeys to activate as and when they like. It's up to the animals to decide whether they want to step inside the device - the equivalent of pressing play - to watch the video of the week, from sealife like fish and jellyfish to wiggly worms and other zoo animals to abstract art and lush forests. (2021-02-23)

Sleep tight! Researchers identify the beneficial role of sleep
Why do animals sleep? Why do humans 'waste' a third of their lives sleeping? Researchers now reveal a novel and unexpected function of sleep that they believe could explain how sleep and sleep disturbances affect brain performance, aging and various brain disorders. Using 3D time-lapse imaging techniques in live zebrafish, they were able to define sleep in a single chromosome resolution and show that single neurons require sleep in order to perform nuclear maintenance. (2019-03-05)

Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects
Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. An article on that was published in the Russian Journal of Marine Biology. (2019-02-14)

A leopard may not change its spots but venomous creatures change their venom recipe often
For a long time scientists believed that an animal's venom was consistent over time. However, through a close study of sea anemones, Dr. Yehu Moran of Hebrew University found that animals change their venom several times over the course of a lifetime, adapting the potency and makeup of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments. (2018-03-05)

Squid-inspired design could mean better handling of underwater vehicles
Inspired by the sleek and efficient propulsion of squid, jellyfish and other cephalopods, a University of Colorado at Boulder researcher has designed a new generation of compact vortex generators that could make it easier for scientists to maneuver and dock underwater vehicles at low speeds and with greater precision. (2006-12-12)

Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra
The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers at UC Davis have now traced the fate of hydra's cells, revealing how three lines of stem cells become nerves, muscles or other tissues. (2019-07-25)

Bright and stable: New acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimaging
Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for visualization of molecular and cellular processes; however, most FPs lose fluorescence at a pH lower than their neutral pKa (~6). A team of Osaka University researchers developed the acid-tolerant green FP -- termed Gamillus -- cloned from flower hat jellyfish. Gamillus exhibits excellent brightness, maturation speed, and photostablity, even in low pH environments, making it a feasible molecular tag for imaging in acidic organelles. (2018-01-04)

Monterey Bay Aquarium study finds sea turtles use flippers to manipulate food
Sea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion, a discovery by Monterey Bay Aquarium researchers published in PeerJ. Research by Jessica Fujii and Dr. Kyle Van Houtan and others reveals a behavior thought to be less likely in marine tetrapods is actually widespread and that this type of exaptation of flippers may have been occurring 70 million years earlier than previously thought. (2018-03-28)

Currents propel the spreading of invasive jellyfish
Twelve years ago, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi, originating from the North American East Coast, appeared in northern European waters. Based on the first comprehensive data collection on the occurrence of this invasive jellyfish in Europe, scientists from 19 countries led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Technical University of Denmark have now shown that ocean currents play a key role for this successful invasion. The study has been published in the international journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. (2018-05-25)

Half-a-billion-year-old fossils shed light animal evolution on earth
Scientists have discovered traces of life more than half-a-billion years old that could change the way we think about how all animals evolved on Earth. (2017-09-11)

Fancy a jellyfish chip?
Mathias Clausen, a Danish researcher, became intrigued by jellyfish when he bit into the marine delicacy and experienced an unexpected crunch; he decided he wanted to 'understand the transformation from soft gel to this crunchy thing.' Clausen and other scientists combined their expertise in biophysics and biochemistry to gain a better understanding of how food preparation affects jellyfish from the inside out. They will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society, held Feb. 17-21. (2018-02-20)

How animals glow (video)
Fireflies, frogs, jellyfish, mushrooms and even parrots have the ability to emit light from their bodies. These creatures use either bioluminescence or fluorescence to put on their light shows. Speaking of Chemistry explains the chemistry behind these natural light sources in this week's video: https://youtu.be/jp-jYVktx7s. (2017-08-14)

Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. Of 67 rare, warm-water species sightings observed, 37 had never been documented so far north before. (2019-03-12)

Capturing the balance of nature
Researchers capture dynamic changes in marine life over twelve years. (2018-03-02)

Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish
Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals. (2018-07-31)

Scientists uncover a centuries-old case of mistaken identity in the Chesapeake Bay
Scientists recently discovered that some jellyfish in the Bay are quite different from their ocean cousins. This led scientists from NOAA and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History to declare them as two different species. (2017-10-13)

Bioengineering team's 'circuit' work may benefit gene therapy
Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have designed genetic 'circuits' out of living cellular material in order to gain a better understanding of how proteins function, with the goal of making improvements. (2018-03-06)

Climate shifts shorten marine food chain off California
Environmental disturbances such as El NiƱo shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time. (2017-10-19)

Invasive Australian jellyfish sighted in Gulf of Mexico in summer 2007
The invasive Australian jellyfish, Phyllorhiza punctata, first reported in great quantities in the Gulf of Mexico in 2000, has made a vigorous reappearance this summer in waters from southwestern Louisiana to Morehead City, N.C. Beachgoers and boaters are encouraged to report their sightings of these exotic jellies to the Dauphin Island Sea Lab's jellyfish website, Dockwatch. (2007-08-17)

In living color: seeing cells from outside the body with synthetic bioluminescence
Glowing creatures like fireflies and jellyfish are captivating to look at but also a boon for science, as their bioluminescent molecules contribute to visualizing a host of biological processes. Now, scientists in Japan have supercharged these molecules, making them hundreds of times brighter in deep tissues and allowing for imaging of cells from outside the body. The bioengineered light source was used to track cancer cells in mice and brain-cell activity in monkeys, but its applications extend beyond the lab. (2018-02-22)

Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?
Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat. (2019-01-17)

Tracing the puzzling origins of clinging jellyfish
The first genetic study of the diversity of clinging jellyfish populations around the globe has discovered some surprising links among distant communities of jellies and also revealed there may be more than one species of the infamous stinger. The paper published April 18 in the journal Peer J. (2017-04-18)

Fossil orphans reunited with their parents after half a billion years
Everyone wants to be with their family for Christmas, but spare a thought for a group of orphan fossils that have been separated from their parents since the dawn of animal evolution, over half a billion years ago. (2017-12-12)

DNA tests on albatross poo reveal secret diet of top predator
A study that used DNA tests to analyse the scats of one of the world's most numerous albatrosses has revealed surprising results about the top predator's diet. DNA analysis of 1460 scats from breeding sites around the Southern Ocean has shown that the diet of black-browed albatrosses contains a much higher proportion of jellyfish than previously thought. (2017-10-18)

Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria
Trichoplax, one of the simplest animals on Earth, lives in a highly specific and intimate symbiosis with two types of bacteria. One, Grellia, is related to parasitic bacteria that cause typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. However, it does not appear to harm Trichoplax. The other, Ruthmannia, sits inside the cells Trichoplax uses to digest its food. This symbiosis provides a window into microbial dark matter. The study is published in Nature Microbiology. (2019-06-10)

How a 'jellyfish'-shaped structure relieves pressure in your cells
Scientists at Scripps Research have solved the structure of a key protein that senses when our cells swell. (2018-08-16)

Jellyfish's 'superpowers' gained through cellular mechanism
Jellyfish are animals that possess the unique ability to regenerate body parts. A team of Japanese scientists has now revealed the cellular mechanisms that give jellyfish these remarkable 'superpowers.' (2019-10-01)

Squid, jellyfish and wrinkled skin inspire materials for anti-glare screens and encryption
What do squid and jellyfish skin have in common with human skin? All three have inspired a team of chemists to create materials that change color or texture in response to variations in their surroundings. These materials could be used for encrypting secret messages, creating anti-glare surfaces, or detecting moisture or damage, they say. The researchers are presenting their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2016-08-21)

Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurt
Electronic-skin technologies for prosthetics and robots can detect the slightest touch or breeze. But oddly, the sensors that make this possible do not respond effectively to a harmful blow. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a jellyfish-inspired electronic skin that glows when the pressure against it is high enough to potentially cause an injury. (2017-11-01)

Structure of a protein complex related with cell survival revealed
A team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has determined for the first time the high-resolution structure of a complex (R2TP) involved in key processes for cell survival and in diseases such as cancer. This achievement has been made possible by using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy. (2018-04-16)

'Mysterious' ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? A new study by researchers at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, and the British Geological Survey provides strong proof that Dickinsonia was an animal. (2017-09-14)

Brazilian study compiles data on 958 types of South American jellyfish
Detailed information on 958 distinct morphological types of jellyfish that inhabit the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America has been compiled in a census published in Zootaxa, the leading zoological taxonomy journal. Coordinated by Brazilian scientists, the study involved scientists from Argentina, Chile, Peru, Colombia and Uruguay. (2017-01-06)

Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician
Marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal are filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period. (2019-06-04)

Revealing the evolutionary history of threatened sea turtles
New genetic research carried out at the American Museum of Natural History clarifies our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among all seven sea turtle species and shows that specialized diets arose independently. The refined phylogeny has important implications for conservation of these threatened, highly migratory animals. (2008-10-15)

Low level of oxygen in Earth's middle ages delayed evolution for 2 billion years
A low level of atmospheric oxygen in Earth's middle ages held back evolution for 2 billion years, raising fresh questions about the origins of life on this planet. New research by the University of Exeter explains how oxygen was trapped at such low levels. (2017-02-02)

Releasing our inner jellyfish in the fight against infection
How mucus genes dating back to our time as a jellyfish could be key in our quest for new antibiotics. (2018-07-09)

Wound healing or regeneration -- the environment decides?
For humans, the loss of limbs is almost always an irreversible catastrophe. Many animals, however, are not only able to heal wounds but even to replace whole body parts. Biologists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now been able to prove for the first time that comb jellyfish can switch between two completely different self-healing processes depending on the environmental conditions. The study has been published in the international journal Scientific Reports. (2017-11-29)

New study helps explain recent scarcity of Bay nettles
A new, long-term study of how environmental conditions affect the abundance and distribution of jellyfish in the nation's largest estuary helps explain the widely reported scarcity of sea nettles within Chesapeake Bay during the past few months and raises concerns about how a long-term continuation of this trend might harm Bay fisheries as climate continues to warm. (2018-10-10)

Popular science helps to discover the abundance of this jellyfish
When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that later, in the 20th century, it failed to turn up for six decades. A team of scientists, with the help of a citizen initiative, has now confirmed that it is not really as difficult to find as previously believed. (2018-11-13)

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