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Why conservation fails
The only way for northern countries to halt deforestation in the South is to make sure land owners are paid more than it costs them to conserve the forest. However, there is a fundamental contradiction in this policy, according to new research published in the Journal of Economic Theory. (2016-11-28)

New process enables easier isolation of carbon nanotubes
Using this new method, long carbon nanotubes with high structural integrity, and without contaminants, can be obtained. The improved characteristics of these high-quality nanotubes can then be utilized in fields such as materials science, and in electrical and biomedical applications. (2016-01-20)

Cooking with wood or coal is linked to increased risk of respiratory illness and death
Burning wood or coal to cook food is associated with increased risk of hospitalization or dying from respiratory diseases, according to new research conducted in China and published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2018-09-21)

Scientists discovered where black carbon comes from in the Arctic in winter and summer
Scientists from seven countries published an article on the study of the sources of black carbon (BC) emissions in the Arctic. BC aerosols are formed under incomplete fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Soot which is the main component of BC amplifies the melting of snow and ice cover, accelerating global warming. Based on the complex elemental and isotopic analysis the scientists revealed the seasonal contribution of various Arctic areas to BC emissions. (2019-02-15)

New type of fuel found in Patagonia fungus
A team led by a Montana State University professor has found a fungus that produces a new type of diesel fuel. Gary Strobel calls it (2008-11-03)

Thorium reactors may dispose of enormous amounts of weapons-grade plutonium
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a new technology for multipurpose application of large amounts of weapons-grade plutonium accumulated in Russia and across the world. Instead of expensive storage of this nuclear material, TPU physicists propose to burn weapons-grade plutonium in reactors with thorium fuel, converting it into power and thermal energy. The units are capable of operating at low capacity (from 60 MW) at least 10-20 years. (2018-01-19)

Study boosts hope for cheaper fuel cells
Simulations by Rice University scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells. (2018-01-05)

Is Arctic warming influencing the UK's extreme weather?
Severe snowy weather in winter or extreme rains in summer in the UK might be influenced by warming trends in the Arctic, according to climate scientists in the US and the UK. (2018-01-04)

Conversation quickly spreads droplets inside buildings
With implications for the transmission of diseases like COVID-19, researchers have found that ordinary conversation creates a conical 'jet-like' airflow that quickly carries a spray of tiny droplets from a speaker's mouth across meters of an interior space. (2020-09-29)

Ulysses mission coming to a natural end
Ulysses, the mission to study the Sun's poles and the influence of our star on surrounding space is coming to an end. After more than 17 years in space -- almost four times its expected lifetime -- the mission is finally succumbing to its harsh environment and is likely to finish sometime in the next month or two. (2008-02-22)

The new bioenergy research center: building on ten years of success
The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently embarked on a new mission: to develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum. (2018-02-18)

New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines
Researchers have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines. (2017-12-14)

Scientists propose method to improve microgrid stability and reliability
The power grid has a large reserve of energy to continue in an active state, while a microgrid quickly spends its reserve. The microgrid's renewable reserve, however, makes the microgrid system an attractive power prospect worth pursuing, and a collaborative team of researchers have proposed a way to better control the easily spent microgrids. (2017-08-31)

New process produces hydrogen at much lower temperature
Waseda University researchers have developed a new method for producing hydrogen, which is fast, irreversible, and takes place at much lower temperature using less energy. This innovation is expected to contribute to the spread of fuel cell systems for automobiles and homes. (2016-12-01)

Hydrogen vehicles might soon become the global norm
Roughly one billion cars and trucks zoom about the world's roadways. Only a few run on hydrogen. This could change after a breakthrough achieved by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The breakthrough? A new catalyst that can be used to produce cheaper and far more sustainable hydrogen powered vehicles. (2020-08-24)

Soot transported from elsewhere in world contributes little to melting of some Antarctic glaciers
Airborne soot produced by wildfires and fossil-fuel combustion and transported to the remote McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contains levels of black carbon too low to contribute significantly to the melting of local glaciers, according to a new study by researchers supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). (2018-03-16)

Renewable energy needed to drive uptake of electric vehicles
Plugging into renewable energy sources outweighs the cost and short driving ranges for consumers intending to buy electric vehicles, according to a new study. Queensland University of Technology Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dr. Kenan Degirmenci, from QUT Business School, said environmental performance -- or being green -- was more important than price or range confidence for electric vehicle consumers. (2017-04-03)

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education
A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues. These revenues could finance expenses towards sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. India could cover more than 90 percent of its needs to finance progress towards these sustainability goals. This could also be an attractive option for countries like Nigeria, Burundi and Senegal. (2018-07-16)

Resilient red blood cells need fuel to adapt their shape to the environment
An international research team led by Osaka University built a novel 'Catch-Load-Launch' microfluidic device to monitor the resilience of red blood cells after being held in a narrow channel for various periods of time. They found that the time for the red blood cell to spring back into shape was shorter for when starved of adenosine triphosphate or exposed to endotoxins. These findings may help improve treatments for patients with sepsis or malaria. (2017-03-29)

Siberian scientists learned how to reduce harmful emissions from HPPs
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and their colleagues from Novosibirsk and the Netherlands modeled the process of coal burning in HPP boilers and found out which type of fuel produced less harmful emissions. The study was published in Fuel journal. (2018-01-22)

Army researchers conduct first-ever combustion experiment with X-rays
The US Army Research Laboratory's Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Propulsion made an historic first with its experiment in a gas turbine combustor using X-rays. The data will help advance gas turbine engine designs for higher power density and efficiency, scientists said. (2018-04-13)

US nuclear regulators greatly underestimate potential for nuclear disaster
The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission relied on faulty analysis to justify its refusal to adopt a critical measure for protecting Americans from nuclear-waste fires at dozens of reactor sites around the country, according to an article in the May 26 issue of Science magazine. Radioactivity from such a fire could force approximately 8 million people to relocate and result in $2 trillion in damages. (2017-05-25)

Nature has more than one way to make methane, say Utah State University biochemists
Utah State University biochemists, with collaborators from the University of Washington and Montana State University, report a bacterial, iron-only nitrogenase pathway for methane formation. (2018-01-15)

The trouble with hybrids
Hybrid electric vehicles are no more than a stop-gap until more sustainable technology is developed, according to a report published recently in the Inderscience publication International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management. (2008-02-07)

New technologies to eliminate fossil fuel use in the sugar industry
QUT researchers are developing and testing new technologies as part of a $5.7 million three-year project with the potential to eliminate the use of fossil fuels in the sugar industry. The project, which aims to turn sugarcane trash into renewable fuels, has just received funding of $2.1 million from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency. (2016-04-27)

Researchers produce biofuel for conventional diesel engines
In accordance with an EU directive, conventional automotive diesel is supplemented with seven percent biodiesel. This proportion is set to rise to ten percent by 2020. However, this presents a significant technical challenge: biodiesel vaporises at higher temperatures, which can lead to problems with electronic fuel injection systems and particulate filters. Researchers from Kaiserslautern, Bochum, and Rostock have developed a method for producing a petroleum diesel-like fuel from conventional biodiesel at low temperatures. (2017-06-19)

Excess fat disrupts heart cell's energy system
A University of Iowa study finds that lipid overload in heart cells, a common feature in diabetes and obesity, leads to misshapen mitochondria that don't produce energy efficiently. This structural disruption may contribute to the two- to five-fold increased risk of heart failure in people with diabetes. (2018-01-05)

Improved water splitting advances renewable energy conversion
Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently create hydrogen from water -- an important key in making renewable energy production and storage viable. (2016-10-25)

WSU researchers see health effects across generations from popular weed killer
Washington State University researchers have found a variety of diseases and other health problems in the second- and third-generation offspring of rats exposed to glyphosate, the world's most popular weed killer. In the first study of its kind, the researchers saw descendants of exposed rats developing prostate, kidney and ovarian diseases, obesity and birth abnormalities. (2019-04-23)

New core-shell catalyst for ethanol fuel cells
Scientists at Brookhaven Lab and the University of Arkansas have developed a highly efficient catalyst for extracting electrical energy from ethanol, an easy-to-store liquid fuel that can be generated from renewable resources. The catalyst steers the electro-oxidation of ethanol down an ideal chemical pathway that releases the liquid fuel's full potential of stored energy. (2019-06-07)

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener engines
Technology developed at the University of Waterloo reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent. (2018-03-21)

Physicists see similarities in stream of sand grains, exotic plasma at birth of universe
Streams of granular particles bouncing off a target in a simple tabletop experiment produce liquid-like behavior also witnessed in a massive research apparatus that simulates the birth of the universe. A team led by the University of Chicago's Sidney Nagel and Heinrich Jaeger report this surprising finding in the Oct. 27-Nov. 2 issue of Physical Review Letters. (2007-11-06)

New findings from NYU Abu Dhabi and JPL about how 'giant' planets impact neighbors' habitability
In a new study published today in The Astrophysical Journal, researchers from New York University Abu Dhabi and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, share new findings about how the presence of 'giant' planets (between 10 and 1000 times as large as the Earth) affects potentially habitable neighbors that would be discovered with the next generation of ground-based and space-borne telescopes. (2018-04-04)

Biofuels not as 'green' as many think
Statements about biofuels being carbon neutral should be taken with a grain of salt. This is according to researchers at the University of Michigan Energy Institute after completing a retrospective, national-scale evaluation of the environmental effect of substituting petroleum fuels with biofuels in the US. America's biofuel use to date has in fact led to a net increase in carbon dioxide emissions, says lead author John DeCicco in Springer's journal Climatic Change. (2016-08-25)

Scientists detect radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a star
An MIT scientist has detected radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a star, suggesting black hole emits a jet of energy proportional to the stellar material it gobbles up. (2018-03-19)

Nanoalloys 10 times as effective as pure platinum in fuel cells
A new type of nanocatalyst can result in the long-awaited commercial breakthrough for fuel cell cars. Research results from Chalmers University of Technology and Technical University of Denmark show that it is possible to significantly reduce the need for platinum, a precious and rare metal, by creating a nanoalloy using a new production technique. The technology is also well suited for mass production. (2017-05-24)

A model for autoignition in turbulent jets
Jets are rapid streams of liquids or gases that forcefully shoot into a surrounding medium. When ignitable substances are involved, combustion--rapid chemical reactions that result in heat and light--can occur. Autoignition ensues when this spontaneous combustion results in a visible flame. In a newly-published paper, authors provide a mathematical model for autoignition in free round turbulent jets. (2018-03-09)

The tropics may be expanding
Atmospheric temperature measurements by U.S. weather satellites indicate Earth's hot, tropical zone has expanded farther from the equator since 1979, says a study by scientists from the University of Utah and University of Washington. But they do not know yet if the tropical expansion was triggered by natural climate variation or by human-caused phenomena such as depletion of the atmosphere's ozone layer or global warming due to the greenhouse effect. (2006-05-25)

Bristol scientists turn beer into fuel
Chemists at the University of Bristol have made the first steps towards making sustainable petrol using beer as a key ingredient. (2017-12-06)

High-performance multimetallic AuPd@Pd@Pt core-interlayer-shell icosahedral electrocatalysts for ORR
Pt-based core-shell electrocatalysts have received abundant research interests over the past decade. Recently, a research team led by Professor Deren Yang from Zhejiang University has successfully synthesized the AuPd@Pd@Pt core-interlayer-shell nanoicosahedra catalysts for oxygen reduction. Such catalysts exhibited not only an excellent ORR activity but also a good durability compared with commercial Pt/C, arising from the incorporation of Pd ultrathin interlayer. (2018-05-04)

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