Popular Jobs News and Current Events

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WVU study reveals falsification issues in higher education hiring processes
When concerns are expressed about distrust in science, they often focus on whether the public trusts research findings. A new study from West Virginia University, however, explores a different dimension of trust. (2019-09-30)

Men place less value on care-oriented careers like nursing: UBC study
Men assign less importance to care-oriented careers than women do, possibly because men internalize different values than women, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2018-08-20)

Insecure workers less likely to have access to family friendly arrangements
New research shows that workers who fear they may lose their jobs are less likely to have access to family-friendly flexible working arrangements. (2018-02-06)

The impact of the 'war on drugs' for female 'mules'
University of Kent research on women working as drug 'mules' has found they aren't victims of their sex but of the trade, and its illegal status. Dr Nayeli Urquiza Haas of the University's Kent Law School compared different legal developments and strategies in Europe and Latin America (2017-11-06)

Age and education affect job changes, study finds
New research reveals that people are more likely to change jobs when they are younger and well educated, though not necessarily because they are more open to a new experience. Researchers found that both individual characteristics and the labor market are factors in career mobility. The results, published in the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, show that people were more likely to change their organizations, industries, and occupations when they were younger, with the age effect being strongest. (2018-07-05)

The Great Recession took a toll on public health, study finds
The Great Recession, spanning 2008 to 2010, was associated with heightened cardiovascular risk factors, including increased blood pressure and glucose levels, according to a new UCLA-led study. The connections were especially pronounced among older homeowners and people still in the work force, two groups that may have been especially vulnerable to the stresses the Recession brought about. (2018-03-12)

Workplace sexism's effects on women's mental health and job satisfaction
A new Journal of Applied Social Psychology study investigates the associations between workplace sexism, sense of belonging at work, mental health, and job satisfaction for women in male-dominated industries. (2019-02-06)

Bullying bosses negatively impact employee performance and behavior
Employees bullied by their bosses are more likely to report unfairness and work stress, and consequently become less committed to their jobs or even retaliate, according to a Portland State University study. (2019-03-07)

Pew Research Center: Women and men in stem often at odds over workplace equity
Half of women working in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs report having experienced gender discrimination at work, according to a new Pew Research Center survey examining people's experiences in the workplace and perceptions of fair treatment for women -- as well as racial and ethnic minorities -- in STEM occupations. (2018-01-09)

Research shows why we struggle to get good night's sleep as we get older
New research has identified the way age impairs the ability of the circadian clock in mammals to re-set itself when exposed to light, resulting in disruption to sleeping patterns and consequent threats to wellbeing. (2018-03-27)

Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

Conference on gender and social violence
An international conference entitled A gender prospective on social violence will be held in Rome, Italy on Tuesday 21 June. (2016-06-20)

New study finds $1 million-per-mile economic impact of TVA reservoirs
UTIA researchers conducted in-depth surveys of visitors and property owners along three of TVA's 49 reservoirs -- Norris, Watts Bar and Chickamauga -- during Summer 2016. The study determined that the combination of aquatic recreation and waterfront property along the Tennessee Valley Authority's managed river system creates $11.9 billion of annual economic impact to the region -- the equivalent of $1 million per shoreline mile. (2017-05-24)

Trauma support for welfare recipients helps them earn more
Research shows that addressing Welfare recipients' past and current trauma help them earn more at their jobs -- providing hope for an exit from the program. (2018-01-26)

Kent scientists find new cultivation system to battle parasite causing diarrhoea
Kent scientists find new cultivation system to battle parasite causing diarrhoea A research team at the University of Kent has established the first long-term cultivation system at a laboratory scale for the parasite Cryptosporidium, one of the world's worst and most common causes of diarrhoea and death from diarrhoea. (2017-12-04)

High GPA could work against young women job hunters
Stellar grades in college could hurt -- rather than help -- women new to the job market, according to a new study that suggests employers place more value on the perceived 'likability' of female applicants than on their academic success. (2018-03-22)

Analysis links US government global health R&D funding to jobs, economic benefits across states
The Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today by the Global Health Technologies Coalition. This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal funding to create vaccines and treatments to combat deadly global diseases also benefits American states. (2018-05-01)

Linking success in some fields to intellectual talent undermines women's interest in them
Due to the cultural stereotypes that portray 'brilliance' as a male trait, messages that tie success in a particular field, job opportunity, or college major to this trait undermine women's interest in it. (2018-01-09)

Why some of your old work commitments never seem to go away
You can quit work commitments if you want - but some of them never really leave you, new research suggests. In a study of 420 employees representing a wide variety of occupations and work settings at three organizations, researchers found that commitments that workers no longer had were still lingering in their minds. (2018-01-18)

Coalition seeks to increase transparency on life science career prospects
Nine US research universities and a major cancer institute today announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects. (2017-12-14)

Despite fewer looking for work, gains continue for Americans with disabilities
Job gains continued for Americans with disabilities in May, although fewer were looking for work, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment - Monthly Update (nTIDE). (2018-06-01)

Health staff 'too stressed' to deal with disasters
Increasing stress and a lack of motivation among healthcare staff could result in hospitals having to shut down in the wake of a major incident such as flooding or an earthquake, according to new research published in the journal Procedia Engineering. (2018-02-26)

Study shows investors lose, insiders win when IPOs involve analysts
When equity analysts are more involved in a firm's initial public offering, investors who purchase stock based on these analysts' reports lose more than 3 percent of their investment, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo School of Management. (2018-01-25)

New study finds that workplace anxiety isn't always a bad thing
Researchers have developed a new comprehensive model of workplace anxiety. It includes triggers for anxiety in the workplace and its effect on employee performance. (2018-04-17)

Working in female-dominated workplaces means worse access to flexible working arrangements
Workers in female-dominated workplaces have worse access to flexible working arrangements than those in gender-neutral and even male-dominated workplaces, new research from the University of Kent has found. (2018-01-24)

Job hunters drop ties with supportive colleagues
People considering quitting their jobs stop supporting current colleagues because they no longer feel they need to do favours for them, research shows. (2018-04-16)

Having two jobs is great for employers, but family life suffers
People who hold two jobs demonstrate as much engagement and performance in the workplace as their colleagues who have one job. However, dual job holders are likely to sacrifice family and personal time as a result. These are the findings of a new study in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology led by Brian Webster of Ball State University in the US. (2018-05-02)

For entomologists, a gender gap remains in academic, government employment
Despite a healthy pipeline of women graduating from entomology programs in the United States, insect science jobs in academia and government are disproportionately held by men, according to a new study in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America. The study indicates that men exceed women in university and federal entomology jobs by a 3-to-1 ratio, even though women have earned more than 40 percent of doctoral degrees in entomology for the past decade. (2018-09-05)

Recent trends of marriage in Iran
Data about marriages in Iran points to the declining number of formal (arranged) marriages in recent decades despite strong cultural and religious traditions favoring such marriages. (2018-05-16)

Jobs vs. death toll: Calculating corporate death penalties
What misdeeds warrant corporate death penalties? A new study explores two case studies focused on industries that kill more people than they employ. The study lays out the rationale for establishing an actionable threshold and offers insights into solutions. Using case studies in coal and tobacco, it calculates the number of deaths attributed to the coal and tobacco industries and finds surprising results. (2019-02-19)

Anxiety can impact people's walking direction
People experiencing anxiety and inhibition have more activity in the right side of the brain, causing them to walk in a leftward trajectory. New research led by Dr Mario Weick of the School of Psychology at the University of Kent has for the first time linked the activation of the brain's two hemispheres with lateral shifts in people's walking trajectories. (2016-01-19)

Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plants
A new synthetic hormone promises to tease apart the many different roles of the plant hormone auxin and could lead to a new way to ripen fruit. (2018-01-22)

One in 4 people leave work a year after a heart attack, Danish study finds
One in four people in Denmark who suffer a heart attack leave their jobs within a year of returning to work. Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (2017-10-04)

Poll: Younger women, college educated women more likely to say they have been harassed
This report is part of a series titled (2017-12-11)

Curiosity can predict employees' ability to creatively solve problems, research shows
Employers who are looking to hire creative problem-solvers should consider candidates with strong curiosity traits, and personality tests may be one way to tease out those traits in prospective employees, new research from Oregon State University shows. (2016-11-17)

Mentally tiring work may increase diabetes risk in women
Women who find their jobs mentally tiring are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings suggest that mentally draining work, such as teaching, may increase the risk of diabetes in women. This suggests that employers and women should be more aware of the potential health risks associated with mentally tiring work. (2019-03-13)

Increase in storms could have 'catastrophic impact' on fishing industry
Potential changes in the frequency and intensity of storms off the coast of the UK and around the world could have a 'catastrophic impact' on the livelihood of fishermen and sustainability of fishing industries, research led by the University of Exeter has shown. (2018-06-25)

Greater job satisfaction for transgender employees
Transgender individuals in the workplace can sometimes feel stigmatized, either through the actions and attitudes of their coworkers, or through their own fears of being treated as an 'other.' But recent research from Larry Martinez at Portland State University shows that the experiences of employees who transition genders is highly dependent on the interactions they have with their coworkers. (2016-11-23)

Do unmarried women face shortages of partners in the US marriage market?
One explanation for declines in marriage is a shortage of economically-attractive men for unmarried women to marry. Indeed, a new study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family reveals a significant scarcity of such potential male spouses. (2019-09-05)

New study shows gender pay gap is still issue for airline staff
The gender pay gap within airlines is often attributed to the fact that men frequently carry out high technically skilled jobs such as pilots and mechanics, whereas women commonly work in customer service roles like cabin crew. But a new paper by Swansea University researchers has revealed that the gap exists for cabin crew after controlling for contract type. (2019-06-17)

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