Popular Juvenile Offenders News and Current Events

Popular Juvenile Offenders News and Current Events, Juvenile Offenders News Articles.
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Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems
Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. (2018-01-04)

Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska's most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. (2017-01-18)

What your TV habits may say about your fear of crime
When it comes to prime-time crime shows, do you like dramas like (2011-02-07)

How to color a lizard: From biology to mathematics
Skin color patterns in animals arise from microscopic interactions among colored cells that obey equations discovered by Alan Turing. Researchers at UNIGE and SIB report that a lizard acquires its adult skin color by changing the color of individual skin scales using an esoteric computational system invented by John von Neumann. The researchers shows that the 3-D geometry of the lizard's skin scales causes the Turing mechanism to transform into the von Neumann computing system. (2017-04-12)

Program for offenders with mental health or addiction issues produces positive results
A review of a state program launched two years ago to improve recovery and reduce recidivism among felony offenders who have mental health or addiction issues shows the program is producing positive results. (2017-11-30)

Forensic experts compile guide on how to ID child abuse, starvation
Forensic science experts from North Carolina State University have just published a comprehensive overview of forensic research that can be used to identify child abuse and starvation. (2014-01-31)

Warming Arctic climate constrains life in cold-adapted mammals
A new study led by Joel Berger has uncovered previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow events, winter precipitation and ice tidal surges on the muskoxen. (2018-01-18)

Reducing severe violence among adolescents
A special section of the journal Child Development includes new research exploring severe youth violence. The articles discuss, for example, how male and female perpetrators of violence develop. Among other new research, the special section explores how early detection of violence can be improved in school settings. (2017-01-03)

Female criminals -- questioning popular perceptions
Is a female offender an anomaly? We tend to think of women as being less prone to violence than men. (2013-01-23)

Research reveals restorative justice reduces recidivism
Restorative justice programs, such victim-offender mediation and community impact panels, are more effective in reducing recidivism rates among juvenile offenders than traditional court processing, a study by researchers at Sam Houston State University found. (2016-07-28)

Mothers' lack of legal knowledge linked to juvenile re-offending
Youth who commit crimes for the first time are more likely to re-offend if their mothers don't participate in their legal process, but mothers are widely unfamiliar with the juvenile justice system, finds a new study by an Michigan State University criminologist. (2017-01-05)

Many victims of crime unhappy with criminal justice system
A new study into victim's satisfaction with the criminal justice system has found many victims feel their involvement in the justice system adds to their feelings of loss and trauma. (2011-09-27)

Prisoner HIV program leads to continuum of medical care after release
By linking HIV positive prisoners to community-based medical care prior to release through an innovative program called Project Bridge, 95 percent of ex-offenders were retained in health care for a year after being released from incarceration, according to researchers from the Miriam Hospital. (2008-05-07)

Juvenile stroke: Causes often not known
Strokes without a definitive identifiable cause account for up to 50 percent of juvenile strokes. In juvenile strokes, the range of causes is wider and their frequency distribution differs from that in older stroke patients, in whom the classic cardiovascular risk factors are primarily implicated. (2017-09-08)

Laws against juveniles are sweeping the country, says Temple University professor
Laws relating to juvenile crime, including treating young people as adults, have risen since the mid 1990s because of public outcry, fear, and concern over juvenile violence, according to Temple University criminal justice professor Joan McCord, Ph.D. (2001-03-12)

Female sex offenders often have mental problems
Women who commit sexual offenses are just as likely to have mental problems or drug addictions as other violent female criminals. This according to the largest study ever conducted of women convicted of sexual offenses in Sweden. (2008-05-14)

Tropical birds live longer than temperate counterparts
An international research team has found strong evidence that passerine birds near the equator live longer than their higher latitude counterparts. (2018-03-07)

Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbullies
Student bullying on the internet could be headed for a showdown with a 50-year-old U.S. Supreme Court case that granted expansive First Amendment rights to kids in public school. When it does, University of Illinois journalism professor Benjamin Holden, through a two-part legal study - part of which was published this week - is ready to make the case for challenging the offenders, arguing for new standards under which school officials can punish cyberbullying. (2018-04-03)

Collapse of mitochondria-associated membrane in ALS
Mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) is a contacting site of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and plays a key role in cellular homeostasis. Researchers at Nagoya University identified that disruption of the MAM is tightly involved in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (2016-11-08)

The minimum age of criminal responsibility
One of the most complex, contested and controversial questions confronting modern juvenile/youth justice systems concerns the minimum age of criminal responsibility: the age at which a child is deemed to be sufficiently 'mature' to be held responsible before the substantive criminal law. (2013-08-20)

West Coast waters returning to normal but salmon catches lagging
Ocean conditions off most of the US West Coast are returning roughly to average, after an extreme marine heat wave from about 2014 to 2016 disrupted the California Current Ecosystem and shifted many species beyond their traditional range, according to a new report from NOAA Fisheries' two marine laboratories on the West Coast. Some warm waters remain off the Pacific Northwest, however. (2018-03-09)

Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey, new UW Oshkosh research shows
New research from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator. In a study published last week in the peer-reviewed journal Peerj--the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, UWO scientists reported evidence that a juvenile T. rex fed on a large plant-eating dinosaur, even though it lacked the bone-crushing abilities it would develop as an adult. (2019-03-11)

These dinosaurs lost their teeth as they grew up
By comparing the fossilized remains of 13 ceratosaurian theropod dinosaurs known as Limusaurus inextricabilis collected from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of northwestern China, researchers have been able to reconstruct the dinosaur's growth and development from a young hatchling of less than a year to the age of 10. The findings, reported in Current Biology, uncovered something unexpected: the dinosaurs had teeth as young juveniles that were gradually lost as they grew up. (2016-12-22)

IUPUI study links juveniles' views of police with likelihood of aggressive behavior
A new Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of juvenile offenders finds that when youth perceive police injustice, it affects not only how they view the justice system, but also their rates of aggression. (2017-09-21)

Earth's first giant predators produced killer babies
A new fossil study, led by Jianni Liu from the Northwest University in China, shows young radiodontan arthropods could be voracious predators too. (2018-06-02)

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children. (2020-09-17)

Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)

Study: Most female child molesters were victims of sexual abuse
A University of Georgia study that is the first to systematically examine a large sample of female child molesters finds that many of them were themselves victims of sexual abuse as children. The finding, published in the April issue of the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, has the potential to help break the cycle of abuse by improving treatment for offenders and their young victims. (2008-05-13)

Youth cybercrime linked to friends' influence
Peer influence and low self-control appear to be the major factors fueling juvenile cybercrime such as computer hacking and online bullying, according to a new study led by a Michigan State University criminologist. (2011-06-23)

New research on family-based HIV prevention presented at annual NIH conference
Researchers from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center in Providence, R.I. presented exciting new research today at the National Institute of Mental Health Annual International Research Conference on the Role of Families in Preventing and Adapting to HIV/AIDS. (2008-10-07)

Australian Magpie 'dunks' its food before eating, researchers find
Scientists at the University of York, in collaboration with researchers at Western Sydney University, have shown that the Australian Magpie may 'dunk' its food in water before eating, a process that appears to be 'copied' by its offspring. (2017-09-07)

Experts seek to standardize treatments for childhood rheumatic diseases
Pediatric rheumatic diseases are a varied group of rare diseases including juvenile forms of arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, and other conditions. Currently, there is considerable variability in how patients with these diseases are treated in clinical practice, making it difficult to understand which therapies work best. (2018-01-15)

Educational success curbs effects of child abuse, neglect
The emotional and sexual abuse that some children endure can lead them to commit crimes later in life. (2018-03-14)

Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct, context-dependent calls
Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct calls in differing behavioral contexts, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sabrina Linn and Marina Scheumann from the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover and Serengeti-Park Hodenhagen, Germany, and colleagues. (2018-03-07)

The delicate balance of treating growing but brittle bones
Turning off a bone receptor protein could potentially treat osteoporosis in children without affecting bone growth. (2019-02-01)

New juvenile idiopathic arthritis guideline emphasizes disease-modifying treatments
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview the 2021 Guideline for the Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis at ACR Convergence, the ACR's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

New research shows Juvenile diversion programs work, also curb reoffending tendencies
Juveniles who complete diversion programs for their crimes are less likely to continue their criminal activity as adults, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University. (2018-08-02)

Rare fossil discovery raises questions
Adult and juvenile remains of a giant rodent species (Isostylomys laurdillardi) have been uncovered by researchers, in the Río de la Plata coastal region of southern Uruguay, raising questions about classification within dinomids. (2017-02-22)

Winter flounder on the fast track to recovery
Winter flounder -- sold in markets as flounder or lemon sole -- in the Gulf of Maine went into serious decline in the 1980s, taking with it a major commercial and recreational fishery. New research indicates that winter flounder is a good candidate for stock enhancement, in which juvenile fish hatched from wild brood stock are raised in captivity and released into the wild. (2007-04-16)

Developmental psychotherapy for antisocial adolescents
Working with young offenders is considered difficult activity and often ineffective. Most popular programs focus on behavior control, in the assumption that behavioral problems are a 'lack of something.' Whereas, a developmental approach understands antisocial behavior results from intentions, values and goals that need thorough consideration. A developmental understanding of delinquent youth combines with psychoanalytically informed perspective on treatment in a program carried out successfully in Italy for past 20 years. (2018-05-18)

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