Popular Landscape News and Current Events

Popular Landscape News and Current Events, Landscape News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 999 Results
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)

Satellite images reveal global poverty
How far have we come in achieving the UN's sustainable development goals that we are committed to nationally and internationally? Yes, it can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to give us a very good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries. (2019-01-07)

New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

Special journal issue brings focus to importance of studying landscape pattern
A new special issue of the journal Landscape Ecology organized by scientists at the USDA Forest Service and North Carolina State University assesses the state of the science of landscape pattern analysis. Appearing three decades after the first scientific papers on landscape patterns were published, the special issue includes 14 articles by scientists tackling current problems in the field, introducing new approaches, and suggesting promising research directions and applications. (2019-09-17)

Forest fragmentation disrupts parasite infection in Australian lizards
In a study with implications for biodiversity and the spread of infectious diseases, CU Boulder ecologists have demonstrated that deforestation and habitat fragmentation can decrease transmission of a parasitic nematode in a particular species of Australian lizard, the pale-flecked garden sunskink. (2018-11-29)

Living at the edges
The clustering of protected habitats in the Americas near international borders makes many iconic, wide-ranging animals physically dependent on good relations between neighboring countries and wildlife-friendly borders. (2019-12-04)

Yale study offers new paradigm on ecosystem ecology
Predators have considerably more influence than plants over how an ecosystem functions, according to a Yale study published today in Science. (2008-02-14)

Maintaining tiger connectivity and minimising extinction into the next century
Tigers have lost 95% of their historical range, and what remains is highly fragmented. According to this study, high traffic roads and densely populated urban areas are a severe impediment to tiger movement between fragments. Unplanned development in the future will result in loss of connectivity and an increased possibility of extinction for several tiger populations. To ensure future persistence, tiger populations need to be managed as a network of protected areas connected by corridors. (2018-01-11)

University of Montana ecology professor helps map climate corridors
The corridors of land vital for many wildlife species in the face of climate change often are unprotected. Now, a recently published study from a University of Montana ecology professor and other researchers has tracked these shifting North American habitats. (2018-07-11)

Hiding from a warmer climate in the forest
Global warming threatens forest plants adapted to cooler temperatures. An international team of scientists from the universities of Stockholm, Marseille and Helsinki have unraveled where these species could survive within colder spots in the same forest. The findings can help to understand the effect of climate change on forest biodiversity and what we can do to protect it. (2018-01-11)

New method for tissue regeneration, inspired by nature, described by scientists
Scientists have found a way of mimicking our body's natural healing process, using cell derived nano-sized particles called vesicles, to repair damaged tissue. (2017-10-03)

Weathering rates for mined lands exponentially higher than unmined sites
A new study found a dramatic increase in the chemical weathering rates of mined landscapes, which are melting away bedrock up to 45 times faster than unmined areas. The weathering has global consequences for the cycling of sulfur, a key nutrient for all life forms. (2018-09-25)

For lemurs, size of forest fragments may be more important than degree of isolation
Occurrence probability of three lemur species in tropical dry forest increases with fragment size but can increase or decrease with fragment isolation depending on the species, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Travis Steffens and Shawn Lehman from University of Toronto, Canada. (2018-05-09)

Fires in Australia pop up in places already burned
Fires that span across the Northern Territory and Western Australia appear to have broken out in areas that have already been burned in previous fires. (2017-09-22)

River shaping from floods happens in moderation
An assessment of rivers in the US suggests that although there is a relationship between increased flood size and erosion, the effect is most pronounced for moderate floods. (2016-05-05)

2016 Brexit/Trump election results driven by fear and loathing
In 2016 voters in the US and the UK defied expert predictions with the Vote Leave campaign winning for the UK to leave the European Union (Brexit) and the election of President Donald Trump. A world-first QUT-led study reveals why and how fear may now be driving the global political landscape. (2018-03-09)

Archaeologists identify ancient North American mounds using new image analysis technique
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have used a new image-based analysis technique to identify once-hidden North American mounds, which could reveal valuable information about pre-contact Native Americans. (2018-07-23)

NASA satellite highlights burn scars in British Columbia
This past summer Canada has been plagued with huge forest fires that have spanned most of the provinces. British Columbia has been particularly hard hit with large portions of the landscape being decimated by fire. In these satellite images taken by the NASA'S Aqua satellite, both the natural color and false color burn scars of left by fires can be seen. (2017-09-29)

The benefits and pitfalls of urban green spaces
With the rapid expansion of the urban landscape, successfully managing ecosystems in built areas has never been more important. (2017-09-13)

Impacts of windfarm construction on harbor porpoises
Scientists from Germany, Denmark and the UK have built a model tool to predict what happens to marine animals when exposed to noise from the construction and operation of wind farms at sea. (2018-05-07)

More woodland management needed to help save dormice
Managing woodlands to a greater extent could help stop the decline of Britain's dormice, new research suggests. (2018-06-26)

Land restoration in Ethiopia pays off but climate change necessitates many strategies
In the last decade, Ethiopia has invested more than US$1.2 billion annually in restoring landscapes in several regions of the country. Research led by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) takes stock of Ethiopia's major restoration projects and investigates their impact on ecosystem services. Researchers say their work can help policymakers tailor future restoration actions to specific ecosystem needs. (2019-10-30)

Chemical weathering controls erosion rates in rivers
Chemical weathering can control how susceptible bedrock in river beds is to erosion, according to new research. In addition to explaining how climate can influence landscape erosion rates, the results also may improve scientists' ability to interpret and predict feedbacks between erosion, plate tectonics and Earth's climate. The research, led by The University of Texas at Austin, was published in Nature on April 14, 2016. (2016-04-13)

Lake water recharged by atmospheric precipitation in the Badain Jaran Desert
The water sources for the many of the lakes in the Badain Jaran Desert have been the focus of controversy in recent years. Now researchers have shown several lines of evidence, such as the physical and chemical deposits resulting from shallow subsurface runoff, spring streams, infiltration-excess runoff, and gravity capillary water with a moisture content of 3%-6%, demonstrating that precipitation reaches the base of the megadunes through infiltration and subsequently becomes lake water. (2017-05-04)

Hospital ownership of practice may reduce physician burnout
Among staff in small- to medium-sized primary care practices, hospital ownership is associated with positive perceptions of work environment and lower burnout. (2018-04-09)

Sowing strips of flowering plants has limited effect on pollination
Many pollinating insects benefit from a small-scale agricultural landscape with pastures, meadows and other unploughed environments. In landscapes dominated by arable land, they lack both food and nesting places. Sown flower strips can increase the availability of food for pollinating insects, and are therefore assumed to benefit pollination. However, new research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the effect of the sown flower strips on pollination is limited and cannot compensate for the advantages of a varied landscape. (2018-04-06)

Butterflies thrive in grasslands surrounded by forest
For pollinating butterflies, it is more important to be close to forests than to agricultural fields, according to a study of 32,000 butterflies by researchers at Linköping University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala. The results provide important knowledge about how to plan and manage the landscape to ensure the survival of butterflies. (2019-02-01)

Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
New maps of a mountainous landscape under a key glacier in West Antarctica will be a valuable aid in forecasting sea level changes. (2017-11-20)

Scientist's work may provide answer to martian mountain mystery
By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. Dr. William Anderson, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, co-authored a paper published in the journal Physical Review E that explains the common Martian phenomenon of a mountain positioned downwind from the center of an ancient meteorite impact zone. (2018-01-11)

In bee decline, fungicides emerge as improbable villain
When a Cornell-led team of scientists analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range contractions, they expected to find stressors like changes in land use, geography or insecticides. Instead, they found a shocker: fungicides, commonly thought to have no impact. (2017-11-14)

UC Davis hosts the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference
The University of California, Davis, will host the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference on March 20-22, 2013. Co-organized by UC Davis and the World Bank, the conference will focus on science-based actions that can provide resilience for food systems despite the future uncertainty of climate change and extreme events. (2013-02-19)

A map of the cell's power station
Researchers from the University of Freiburg are mapping the distribution of all proteins in mitochondria for the first time. (2017-08-18)

Corn better used as food than biofuel, study finds
Corn is grown not only for food, it is also an important renewable energy source. Renewable biofuels can come with hidden economic and environmental issues, and the question of whether corn is better utilized as food or as a biofuel has persisted since ethanol came into use. For the first time, researchers at the University of Illinois have quantified and compared these issues in terms of economics of the entire production system to determine if the benefits of biofuel corn outweigh the costs. (2017-06-20)

Coyotes and red foxes may coexist within urban landscapes
Coyotes and red foxes may select different types of habitats for their home ranges, helping them to coexist in urban environments, according to a study published Jan. 24, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marcus A. Mueller from the University of Wisconsin, USA, and colleagues. (2018-01-24)

People can see beauty in complex mathematics, study shows
Ordinary people see beauty in complex mathematical arguments in the same way they can appreciate a beautiful landscape painting or a piano sonata. (2019-09-05)

Antarctic meltwater streams shed light on longstanding hydrological mystery
In one of the coldest, driest places on Earth, CU Boulder scientists have developed a possible answer to a longstanding mystery about the chemistry of streamflow, which may have broad implications for watersheds and water quality around the world. (2019-02-01)

Sea-level rise will have complex consequences
Rising sea levels will affect coasts and human societies in complex and unpredictable ways, according to a new study that examined 12,000 years in which a large island became a cluster of smaller ones. (2020-11-04)

Public willing to pay to improve water quality
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found in a nationwide survey that members of the public are more willing to pay for improved water quality than other ecosystem services such as flood control or protecting wildlife habitats. (2018-03-28)

Parts of the Amazon thought uninhabited were actually home to up to a million people
Parts of the Amazon previously thought to have been almost uninhabited were really home to thriving populations of up to a million people, new research shows. (2018-03-27)

Trees with grassy areas soften summer heat
Trees cool their environment and 'heat islands' like Munich benefit from it. However, the degree of cooling depends greatly on the tree species and the local conditions. In a recent study, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) compared two species of urban trees. (2018-04-23)

Page 1 of 25 | 999 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.