Popular Leopard News and Current Events

Popular Leopard News and Current Events, Leopard News Articles.
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Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators
A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. (2017-12-20)

How tails help geckos and other vertebrates make great strides
A wagging tail is often associated with dogs' emotions, but the side-to-side motion may also help them take longer strides and move faster, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside. The research was done on leopard geckos, which are ideal animals for the study of tail function because they naturally lose their tails as a defense mechanism against predators in a process called autotomy. (2017-09-07)

Canine distemper confirmed in Far Eastern leopard, world's most endangered big cat
The Far Eastern or Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is already among the rarest of the world's big cats, but new research reveals that it faces yet another threat: infection with canine distemper virus (CDV). (2018-01-17)

Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic species
Scientists flying drones in Antarctica have demonstrated a cheaper, faster and simpler way to gauge the condition of leopard seals, which can weigh more than a half ton and reflect the health of the Antarctic ecosystem that they and a variety of commercial fisheries rely on. (2017-11-29)

Field Museum provides gold standard for mammal survey
Several mamalogists at Chicago's Field Museum participated in the IUCN survey of the world's mammals, using the Museum's extensive mammal collections for reference. (2008-10-06)

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock
Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows. (2019-02-26)

Common insecticide can decimate tadpole populations
The latest findings of a University of Pittsburgh-based project to determine the environmental impact of routine pesticide use suggests that malathion -- the most popular insecticide in the United States -- can decimate tadpole populations by altering their food chain, according to research published in the Oct. 1 edition of Ecological Applications. (2008-09-29)

Study finds 84 highly endangered Amur leopards remain in China and Russia
Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China. (2018-07-13)

Moroccan fossils show human ancestors' diet of game
New fossil finds from the Jebel Irhoud archaeological site in Morocco do more than push back the origins of our species by 100,000 years. They also reveal what was on the menu for our oldest-known Homo sapiens ancestors 300,000 years ago: Plenty of gazelle. (2017-06-07)

Leopard meals: Females go for diversity
Leopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Christian Voigt and his colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia. (2018-05-08)

New study provides information on the secret life of an enigmatic Antarctic apex predator
Scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have, for the first time, tracked the lives of leopard seals as they migrate around Antarctica. The team followed these formidable predators as they move from the frozen Antarctic sea-ice to the more northerly sub-Antarctic islands where they prey on penguins, seals and krill. The study is published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-06-05)

Medium-sized carnivores most at risk from environmental change
In a surprise ecological finding, researchers discover medium-sized carnivores spend the most time looking for food, making them vulnerable to change. (2017-12-04)

'Old-fashioned fieldwork' puts new frog species on the map
Months of old-fashioned fieldwork helped define the range and unique characteristics of the recently discovered Atlantic Coast leopard frog. A study published this month in the journal PLOS ONE pinpointed the frog's range along the Eastern Seaboard, its unusual call and a list of distinguishing traits. The lead author is a zoologist with the New York Natural Heritage Program based at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, N.Y. (2018-11-26)

Amur leopard still on the brink of extinction, scientists say
A new census of the world's most endangered cat, the Amur or Far Eastern leopard, shows that as few as 25 to 34 are left in the wild, renewing fears for the future of the species. The census was conducted by World Wildlife Fund, the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Russian Academy of Science. (2007-04-18)

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill. (2018-04-10)

Leopard coral grouper: Overexploited
Researchers measured the population stock in Saleh Bay, Indonesia of the commercially valuable leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus), a species subject to population collapse due to high fishing pressure. (2019-06-06)

Aerial drone photos can yield accurate measurements of leopard seals
Leopard seal measurements derived from aerial drone photographs are as accurate as those taken manually, according to a study published Nov. 29, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Douglas Krause from National Marine Fisheries Service, California, and colleagues. (2017-11-29)

Lung lavage as new test method improves tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros
An international team of scientists led by institutes in Berlin and Jena, Germany, performed repeated lung lavage as a new approach for tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros. Subsequent genetic tests reliably identified mycobacteria in the animals' respiratory fluids -- with minimal stress and risk for the rhinos. The study has been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-12-12)

Unsaddling old theory on origin of horses
Botai horses were tamed in Kazakhstan 5,500 years ago and thought to be the ancestors of today's domesticated horses . . . until a team led by researchers from the CNRS and Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier sequenced their genome. Their findings published on Feb. 22, 2018 in Science are startling: these equids are the progenitors not of the modern domesticated horse, but rather of Przewalski's horses--previously presumed wild! (2018-02-22)

Researcher warns China's program 'riskiest environmental project in history'
A global expert on infrastructure says that China's plan to crisscross half of the Earth with massive transportation and energy projects is environmentally the riskiest venture ever undertaken. (2018-05-15)

U of G study is first to find evidence that leopard geckos can make new brain cells
University of Guelph researchers have discovered the type of stem cell allowing geckos to create new brain cells. This finding provides evidence that lizards may also be able to regenerate parts of the brain after injury. (2018-07-27)

How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production
Green monkeys' alarm calls allow conclusions about the evolution of language. (2019-05-27)

Dynamic collaboration behind new research into best way of using biologging tags
Methods used to design F1 cars and spacecraft have played a crucial role in new research into the tags used to track animal movements. Ecologists teamed up with aerospace colleagues at Swansea University to find the best way to reduce the drag of biologging tags -- the recording devices used to track animal movements and behaviour. (2019-06-20)

Map of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation efforts
The first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore. The findings were reported in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 27, 2018 by Hariyo Tabah Wibisono of the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, USA, and colleagues. (2018-06-27)

Common pesticide inhibits brain development in frogs
New research published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry reveals that low doses of a commonly used pesticide potentially harm the Northern Leopard frog by inhibiting their brain development. (2018-09-06)

New theory linking brain activity to brain shape could throw light on human consciousness
UNSW Australia scientists have shown that complex human brain activity is governed by the same simple universal rule of nature that can explain other phenomena such as the beautiful sound of a finely crafted violin or the spots on a leopard. They have identified a link between the distinctive patterns of brain function that occur at rest and the physical structure of people's brains. (2016-01-26)

New study confirms Cambodia's last leopards on brink of extinction
A new study has confirmed that the world's last breeding population of leopards in Cambodia is at immediate risk of extinction, having declined an astonishing 72% during a five-year period. The population represents the last remaining leopards in all of eastern Indochina - a region incorporating Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. (2018-03-01)

Saving the snow leopard with stem cells
The survival of the endangered snow leopard is looking promising thanks to Monash University scientists who have, for the first time, produced embryonic stem-like cells from the tissue of an adult leopard. (2012-01-22)

FEFU scientists found persistent organic pollutants in animal fur
Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), working as part of an international toxicologists' team, studied fur samples of the wild terrestrial mammals in Primorye, Russian Far East. All samples contained persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are resistant to decomposition, tend to accumulate in body tissues and are potentially risky for human and animal health. Some of them are prohibited by the Stockholm Convention. The research outcome was published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research. (2019-02-13)

Snow leopard and Himalayan wolf diets are about one-quarter livestock
Around a quarter of Himalayan snow leopard and wolf diets are livestock, the rest being wild prey, according to a study published Feb. 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Madhu Chetri from Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway, and colleagues. (2017-02-08)

Wild cat brains: An evolutionary curveball
The brains of wild cats don't necessarily respond to the same evolutionary pressures as those of their fellow mammals, humans and primates, indicates a surprising new study led by a Michigan State University neuroscientist. (2016-10-31)

How dragonfly wings get their patterns
Researchers from Harvard University have developed a model that can recreate, with only a few parameters, the wing patterns of a large group of insects, shedding light on how these complex patterns form. (2018-09-17)

Scat sniffer dogs tell York U researchers a lot about endangered lizards
Dogs can be trained to find almost anything, but one York University researcher had them detect something a little unusual -- the scat of endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizards. The dogs helped find out how important shrubs are in preserving lizard populations in the face of climate change. 'The loss of these lizards would likely have a cascade effect on other species,' said Alex Filazzola, the study lead. (2017-01-31)

Study: High tolerance for wildlife exists around Indian reserves despite continued losses
A new study from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Duke University, and the Centre for Wildlife Studies in India finds that communities living near wildlife reserves in Rajasthan, India, show a high tolerance for wildlife. This is despite them having experienced losses in crops and livestock as a result of interaction with wildlife like nilgai, jackal and wild pig, as well as larger carnivores such as leopard and wolves. Understanding these attitudes towards wildlife is critical to informing park management policies and practices. (2018-01-16)

Prehistoric predators with supersized teeth had beefier arm bones
The toothiest prehistoric predators also had beefier arm bones, according to results of a study published today in the journal Paleobiology. (2012-01-04)

Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert
Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches of habitat. A new study looked at the conservation potential of marginal farmland in the San Joaquin Desert and found that restoration of fallowed farmland could play a crucial role in habitat protection and restoration strategies for the blunt-nosed leopard lizard and other endangered species. (2019-01-15)

Surprised researchers: Number of leopards in northern China on the rise
Most of the world's leopards are endangered and generally, the number of these shy and stunning cats is decreasing. However, according to a recent study by a researcher from University of Copenhagen and colleagues from China, leopard populations in northern China are on the mend. Discover why below. (2020-10-26)

Detection dogs and DNA on the trail of endangered lizards
Detection dogs trained to sniff out the scat of an endangered lizard in California's San Joaquin Valley, combined with genetic species identification, could represent a new noninvasive sampling technique for lizard conservation worldwide. (2019-10-30)

Invasive species in an ecosystem harm native organisms but aid other invasive species
The presence of an invasive species in an ecosystem makes native organisms more susceptible to pollutants and may encourage the spread of additional invasive species, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-10-23)

The benefits of being different
Six different color morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India -- with the findings being hailed as 'an evolutionary puzzle' -- as the world's greatest number of different colored wild cat species in one area are reported. (2019-06-12)

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